Boston Bruins v Montreal Canadiens

Hal Gill says ‘Big Bad Bruins mantra’ can be ‘tough’ for big players


Boston hockey fans can be hard on big players who don’t play with an edge, according to former Bruins defenseman Hal Gill.

“I had my share of fights, but it was never good enough,” Gill, now retiredtold “[It was,] ‘You should have beaten up Tie Domi.’ It was unrealistic, but that’s what the Bruins fans want. That’s the Big Bad Bruins mantra. It can be tough at times.”

Gill made that remark while speaking about new Bruins winger Jimmy Hayes, the towering 25-year-old who had 147 hits, but just 20 PIM, in 72 games last season with Florida.

Hayes has only fought twice in 168 career NHL games.

While Gill believes Hayes will be fine if he stays “true to his game” and “doesn’t get caught up trying to please everyone,” he insists there’s a big difference between playing for Boston, which Gill did for over 600 games, and Montreal, which he did for almost 200 games.

“In Montreal, I was amazed,” he said. “When I was there, they would cheer because I made a nice poke check. They would say, ‘Wow, that was a great poke check.’ With the Bruins, you could play a great game defensively, but if you didn’t kill someone or you didn’t get a big goal, they can pile on you.”

Related: Sweeney vows to return ‘aggressiveness’ to Bruins

Bruins sign three — Hayes, Connolly, and DeFazio

Boston Bruins v Tampa Bay Lightning

A trio of young forwards have signed with the Boston Bruins.

The B’s announced today that Jimmy Hayes has inked a three-year deal with a cap hit of $2.3 million, while Brett Connolly has agreed to a one-year deal with a cap hit of $1.025 million and Brandon DeFazio has signed a one-year, two-way deal with a cap hit of $575,000 at the NHL level.

Hayes, 25, was acquired last week in a trade with the Florida Panthers. He had 19 goals and 16 assists in 72 games last season.

Connolly, 23, was acquired in March in a trade with Tampa Bay, soon after which he suffered a fractured finger and missed most of the remainder of the season.

Hayes will be an unrestricted free agent when his contract expires, while Connolly will remain an RFA. The latter’s $1.025 million cap hit could be a good bargain for the Bruins next season.

DeFazio was an unrestricted free agent. The 26-year-old spent the last two seasons in the Canucks organization, mostly with AHL Utica.

Related: Chiarelli believes Connolly can ‘help us right away’

Bruins sign Beleskey for five years, despite some warning signs


The Boston Bruins want to get back to playing Bruins hockey.

They also want to score more goals.

For those two reasons, the signing of Matt Beleskey makes sense. The 27-year-old winger was among Anaheim’s leaders in hits last season, plus he chipped in 22 goals, then eight more in the playoffs.

But here’s why the Bruins are taking a risk in reportedly giving the unrestricted free agent a five-year commitment, with a cap hit of $3.8 million:

Beleskey scored on 15.2 percent of his shots in 2014-15. Which was a good thing. But his career rate is 9.9, suggesting he may have picked a really profitable season to have some shooting luck.

It’s also possible that skating mostly with Ryan Kesler, plus a fair bit with Ryan Getzlaf, helped Beleskey’s numbers. In 329 career NHL games, Beleskey only has 57 goals.

Look, let’s just say people were saying similar things about UFA David Clarkson, right before Clarkson signed that disastrous contract with the Leafs.

Maybe the Beleskey signing works out a lot better for the Bruins. At the very least, the cap hit and term are considerably less onerous than Clarkson’s. Plus, the Bruins aren’t the Leafs. And if Beleskey gets time with Patrice Bergeron or David Krejci, he’ll be in a position to succeed.

As always on July 1, only time will tell.

Related: Beleskey rejects Ducks’ offer, headed to free agency

Neely was ‘surprised’ that Hamilton didn’t want to sign with Bruins


Yesterday, Dougie Hamilton didn’t want to talk about his reasons for wanting out of Boston.

“For me, I’m just going to keep on saying how excited I am to be a Flame and looking forward to the future and everything,” he said. “What’s in the past is in the past and I think I’m just looking forward to being a Flame to moving to Calgary and seeing the city and the fans.”

But it’s clear he no longer wanted to be a Bruin.

It’s been speculated that the 22-year-old defenseman didn’t get along with coach Claude Julien. There was also talk at the draft in Florida that he felt bullied by Boston’s veteran players. And that may mesh with the report that Hamilton wasn’t the most popular figure in the Bruins’ room.

The whole thing is somewhat reminiscent of Evander Kane’s departure from Winnipeg, minus the clothes in the shower.

Whatever led to Hamilton’s unwillingness to sign long-term with the Bruins, it took club president Cam Neely by surprise.

“I really didn’t get any indications of anything negative in exit meetings,” Neely told the Boston Globe. “So I was surprised.”

Neely told the newspaper that the Bruins made three separate offers — one for four years, another for five, and a third for six. The salary, according to Neely, was not far off what Hamilton agreed to be paid in Calgary.

“We wanted Dougie,” Neely said.

But he didn’t want them.

Related: Sweeney explains Hamilton trade: ‘We extended Dougie a very significant contract offer’

Sharks get Jones from Bruins for first-round pick and unsigned prospect

Toronto Maple Leafs v Los Angeles Kings

Martin Jones is headed back to the Pacific Division.

Less than a week after he was acquired by the Boston Bruins in the Milan Lucic trade, the 25-year-old goalie has been flipped to San Jose, where he’ll form a netminding tandem with Alex Stalock.

As first reported by ESPN’s Pierre LeBrun, the return to Boston is a first-round draft pick in 2016 plus unsigned prospect Sean Kuraly, a forward at Miami University.

“Martin was at the top of our list of players that we had targeted,” said Sharks GM Doug Wilson, per CSN Bay Area. “We’re extremely excited to have him on board.”

The undrafted Jones has a .923 career save percentage in the NHL, which is good. However, he’s only started 29 games total, and his save percentage was just .906 last season for the Kings.

In other words, the Sharks — a team that professes to have a “win right now” mentality — are rolling the dice on a pretty inexperienced goalie. Actually, make that two inexperienced goalies, given Stalock only has 37 career starts to his name.

The Bruins are now without a backup goalie.