Apparently the Bruins Bieber-proofed their locker room (Update: No, they didn’t)


Earlier this month, Justin Bieber caused a stir when he posed with the Stanley Cup in the Chicago Blackhawks locker room. Surprisingly, it wasn’t because he was wearing this:


Instead, the Blackhawks were upset that the pop star stood on the Blackhawks logo, as you can see from Andrew Shaw’s reaction:

That set the table for Saturday, as ESPN Boston reports that the Bruins went as far as to rope off the spoked-B logo in their locker room in fear that Bieber might tarnish their sacred logo while preparing for a concert.

TSN Radio 1050 shares a photo of the “No Bieber zone.”


Hey, the Bruins didn’t win their series against the Blackhawks, but at least they won the protecting their logo battle, right?

In related news,’s Sarah Baicker reveals that Bieber doesn’t have to worry about that Blackhawks logo incident tarnishing his name among his fanatics:

That’s a relief.

Update: It’s an old picture. (Probably the rope is there to keep the media off the logo, as the Bruins’ dressing room is one of the smallest in the NHL.)

Bruins re-sign Caron: one year, $640,000

Jordan Caron #38 of the Boston Bruins is challenged by Marc Staal #18 of the New York Rangers at Madison Square Garden on April 1, 2012 in New York City.
(March 31, 2012 - Source: Chris Trotman/Getty Images North America)

The Boston Bruins have re-upped with restricted free agent Jordan Caron on a one-year, $640,000 deal, according to CSNNE’s Joe Haggerty.

Caron, 22, was Boston’s first-round pick (25th overall) at the 2009 Entry Draft, but has yet to emerge as a full-time contributor at the NHL level.

His best season came in 2011-12, when he posted career highs across the board — games (48), goals (seven), points (15) — making his postseason debut in the process.

This year, though, Caron appeared to take a step back.

He dressed for just 17 regular-season contests, scoring once, and didn’t play a single game for the Bruins in the playoffs.

As such, Caron took a sizable pay cut — he was making $1.1 million annually on his entry-level contract — and it looks as though GM Peter Chiarelli engineer a “prove-it” deal with Caron, much like he did with Tuukka Rask.

Rask, you’ll recall, was signed last summer to a one-year, $3.5 million extension, designed for him to show the Bruins he was capable of being the club’s full-time No. 1 netminder.

The Finn did that and more, backstopping the Bruins to the Stanley Cup Final. His reward? An eight-year, $56 million contract signed last week.

Bruins fire scouting head Wayne Smith

Tyler Seguin

The Boston Bruins decided to fire director of amateur scouting Wayne Smith sometime following the 2013 NHL Draft, reports.

GM Peter Chiarelli provided the Hockey News’ Ken Campbell with a vague explanation for why he was canned.

“We wanted to freshen up our amateur scouting and shift things a little bit and we felt this was the way to do it,” Chiarelli said. “Wayne has done a good job and I’ll give him a good reference, but we wanted to inject some new life.”

Campbell finds the change a little strange.

It seems rather odd, given that Chiarelli admits that Smith is his good friend and is a very good scout. Their prospect list was solid, ranking them 12th among NHL organizations in THN’s Future Watch edition in 2013.

Then again, when you look at the list of players the Bruins have drafted since Smith took over the scouting department in 2007, it’s clear that the Bruins’ impressive work has mainly come from trades and free agent moves.

As Hockey Prospectus’ Corey Pronman points out, Tyler Seguin is the only NHL regular the team drafted from 2007-2010. It’s possible that more recent drafts could produce better results with the likes of Dougie Hamilton and Malcolm Subban in the mix, but first-rounders like Jordan Caron and Zach Hamill haven’t exactly worked out.

Either way, parting with Smith is another example of a Bruins franchise that is adapting on the fly, even amid substantial bigger picture success.

There’s competition for Bruins’ backup goalie gig

Chad Johnson #31 of the Phoenix Coyotes makes a save against the St. Louis Blues in the third period at the Scottrade Center on April 18, 2013 in St. Louis, Missouri. The Blues beat the Coyotes 2-1 in a shootout.
(April 17, 2013 - Source: Dilip Vishwanat/Getty Images North America)

There’s no question that Tuukka Rask will enter the 2013-14 campaign as the Boston Bruins’ undisputed starting goaltender. He was superb in the lockout-shortened season after spending years as the overqualified backup of Tim Thomas.

The fact that the Bruins signed him to an eight-year, $56 million contract speaks volumes about their level of confidence in him and it’s warranted. But Rask’s understudy will still have relevancy next season.

After all, while the Bruins will lean on Rask, the 26-year-old has never played in more than 45 NHL games in a single season. If you expand those numbers to include the minors and professional European leagues, Rask’s regular season career-high was in 2008-09 when he played in 57 contests with the AHL Providence Bruins.

So the Bruins might be cautious about overworking him and with Anton Khudobin gone, they don’t have a clear backup netminder. Chad Johnson, who is 27 years old and has 10 games worth of NHL experience, signed a one-way contract, so he would seem to have the inside track going into training camp, but he’s not the only candidate.

23-year-old goaltender Niklas Svedberg is coming off a great season where he recorded a 2.17 GAA and .925 save percentage in 48 games with Providence. Bruins GM Peter Chiarelli has confirmed that Svedberg will get a shot to win the number two spot, according to the team’s Twitter account.

Malcolm Subban, 19, would be an exciting candidate, but the Bruins aren’t looking to rush him to the NHL. He will start the 2013-14 season in the AHL after a superb campaign with the OHL Belleville Bulls.

Chiarelli says Bruins won’t bring back Jagr

Jaromir Jagr

Jaromir Jagr’s time as a Boston Bruin is officially at an end.

Bruins GM Peter Chiarelli spoke with reporters today and confirmed the team is done with Jagr and looking to go with younger players to fill the roster on the wing.’s Joe Haggerty has the update.

“I was asked a couple of times about [Jagr], and we’re done for now,” said Chiarelli. “Obviously you want to develop your talent and bring them in and let them play. Sometimes there’s not room for them and sometimes you use them as chips in deals, but you always have to develop. To be in a position where they’re ready to play breathes new life into everybody.”

One thing the Bruins don’t have to worry about is bringing in new people. Tyler Seguin, Rich Peverley, Andrew Ference, Nathan Horton, Anton Khudobin, and Jagr are all off to new locations for next season.

With so many openings and not much going on via free agency (sorry Jarome Iginla), competition figures to be fierce in training camp amongst the youngsters.