Pittsburgh Penguins v Boston Bruins - Game Three

Video: Bruins’ Campbell should be ready for start of training camp


With one play, Gregory Campbell epitomized what players will do to win in the Stanley Cup playoffs.

The Boston Bruins forward suffered a broken leg blocking an Evgeni Malkin slap shot in Game 3 of the Eastern Conference final against the Pittsburgh Penguins. Campbell, in extreme pain, somehow struggled to his feet and finished his penalty-killing shift before hobbling off the ice.

The Bruins’ fans, in appreciation, began chanting ‘Camp-bell! Camp-bell!‘ Courageous as it was, the injury forced him out of the playoffs.

However, as Joe Haggerty of CSNNE.com reports, Campbell is “…on track to be ready for the start of training camp next month.”

“He was in town a couple of weeks ago, and he borrowed my car because he’s too cheap to go out and rent one,” Bruins enforcer Shawn Thornton CSNNE.com.

“He looks pretty good. He’s up walking around, and he said that he’s working out. He looks good, so I’m hoping he’s ready to go at the start of camp.”

Poll: Where does Julien rank among Bruins’ coaching greats?

Claude Julien

On paper, few Boston coaches have achieved more than Claude Julien.

He ranks second all-time in wins and made the playoffs every season since taking the gig in 2008. He won the Stanley Cup in 2011, advanced to the Final last year, became the third coach in franchise history to win the Jack Adams and was recently named to Team Canada’s staff for the 2014 Olympics in Sochi.

But remember, this is Boston.

It’s not easy to be considered among the greats.

There are 11 Hockey Hall of Famers that have served as head coach (Art Ross, Cy Denneny, Frank Patrick, Lynn Patrick, Cooney Weiland, Dit Clapper, Georges Boucher, Milt Schmidt, Harry Sinden, Tom Johnson and Gerry Cheevers.)

Those not in the Hall — Don Cherry, Pat Burns, Terry O’Reilly — hold a special place in the organization as well.

Then there’s Julien himself. He lacks the flamboyance/personality of some of his predecessors and comes across as extremely humble. Consider what he said back in March upon passing Schmidt for No. 2 all-time in Bruins’ wins.

“I certainly don’t perceive myself to be in the same category as Milt Schmidt. You’ve got to understand, it’s a different era. Ties were ties and that’s the way it ended.

“We play 82 games and they played somewhere around the 60 mark, if not less, but it’s a lot different era.

“It’s a number, a number of wins, but I’m certainly not ready to compare myself to him and I have a tremendous amount of respect for Milt, and even for Grapes [Cherry, third on list with 231 wins]. Those guys have done a lot for the game.

“It’s nice to know that you’re with them in regards to the number of wins, but certainly not willing to say I’m in the same category as them, yet.”

Let’s turn the discussion over to you, the readers. Where do you put Julien among the greatest Boston coaches of all time?

It’s Boston Bruins day on PHT

2013 NHL Stanley Cup Final - Game Five

Throughout the month of August, PHT will be dedicating a day to all 30 NHL clubs. Today’s team?  The Eastern Conference champion Boston Bruins.

The Boston Bruins came as close as you can to winning the Stanley Cup without doing so. They were moments away from winning Game 6 against Chicago but gave up two goals 17 seconds apart with about a minute to go and saw their dreams dashed on their own ice.

Now they’re heading into next season with a drastically different team and the same lofty level of expectations of winning another Stanley Cup. It’s never not boring in Boston.

Offseason recap

What didn’t happen to the Bruins this summer? They sent apparent party boy Tyler Seguin and Rich Peverley to Dallas for Loui Eriksson. They watched Nathan Horton (Columbus), Jaromir Jagr (New Jersey), Andrew Ference (Edmonton), and Anton Khudobin (Carolina) all walk away in free agency.

Their lone signing in free agency didn’t come without drama as they signed the guy who turned down a trade to go there last season in Jarome Iginla. That makes for an awkward return to Boston, especially after the Bruins knocked out the team he did opt to go to (Pittsburgh) in the Eastern Conference finals.

Two areas they didn’t tweak were ones they’re all set at. Losing Ference may hurt them on defense, but guys like Dougie Hamilton, Matt Bartkowski, and Torey Krug are ready to tackle big minutes regularly.  Tuukka Rask was snubbed for a Vezina Trophy finalist spot but proved he’s the man in goal. They’ll have healthy competition to see who backs him up between Niklas Svedberg and Chad Johnson.

Next season will hinge on how the virtual new set of forwards works out. Coach Claude Julien’s ability to get his team on the same page will be more than tested.


Introducing: PHT’s ‘Team of the Day’ summer series

Bruins’ Iginla making sure ‘rust doesn’t build up’

Pittsburgh Penguins v Boston Bruins - Game Three

Jarome Iginla has hit the ice, as part of his summer training regimen leading into training camp in September.

The Boston Bruins, after losing out on the Iginla sweepstakes in a chaotic turn of events prior to the NHL trade deadline, signed the veteran forward to a one-year deal worth $6 million on the first day of free agency on July 5.

The 36-year-old Iginla, who scored five goals and 11 points in 13 regular season games with the Pittsburgh Penguins, the team he was traded to in April, was recently in British Columbia, Canada, working on the ice in order to sharpen up prior to camp with his new team.

“During the summer, I like to get on the ice definitely starting in July and make sure the rust doesn’t build up, and also work on things to improve,” Iginla told the Bruins Blog recently.

“You always want to keep trying to get better, and try to make sure rust doesn’t get on there…You’ve got to work hard, it’s fun. You want to be prepared going into the season.”

If you’ll recall, Iginla chose the Penguins over the Bruins – although Boston’s GM Peter Chiarelli thought a deal was in place Flames GM Jay Feaster – as the team he wanted to be traded to in what turned out to be the big blockbuster leading up to the deadline.

But in a strange twist in the already thickened plot, the seemingly powerhouse Penguins wilted in the Eastern Conference final, as the Bruins swept them and advanced to the Stanley Cup Final.

Apparently the Bruins Bieber-proofed their locker room (Update: No, they didn’t)


Earlier this month, Justin Bieber caused a stir when he posed with the Stanley Cup in the Chicago Blackhawks locker room. Surprisingly, it wasn’t because he was wearing this:


Instead, the Blackhawks were upset that the pop star stood on the Blackhawks logo, as you can see from Andrew Shaw’s reaction:

That set the table for Saturday, as ESPN Boston reports that the Bruins went as far as to rope off the spoked-B logo in their locker room in fear that Bieber might tarnish their sacred logo while preparing for a concert.

TSN Radio 1050 shares a photo of the “No Bieber zone.”


Hey, the Bruins didn’t win their series against the Blackhawks, but at least they won the protecting their logo battle, right?

In related news, CSNPhilly.com’s Sarah Baicker reveals that Bieber doesn’t have to worry about that Blackhawks logo incident tarnishing his name among his fanatics:

That’s a relief.

Update: It’s an old picture. (Probably the rope is there to keep the media off the logo, as the Bruins’ dressing room is one of the smallest in the NHL.)