Ryan Dadoun

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Canucks hand Weisbrod assistant GM job, make further front office changes

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John Weisbrod joined the Vancouver Canucks to serve as a vice president of player personnel early on in the franchise’s front office shakeup. That process continued today, impacting several members of the organization and resulting in him getting the title of assistant general manager.

It’s a job he’s familiar with as he spent three years in that role with the Calgary Flames. Before that he served as the Boston Bruins’ director of professional and collegiate scouting from 2006 to 2011.

This move comes after Vancouver fired assistant general managers Laurence Gilman and Lorne Henning last month.

“We have made some difficult decisions to our roster and staff recently after a thorough review of the team,” said Linden at the time. “These are not easy decisions, nor were they taken lightly. But they’re important as we transition this team and build for the future.”

Speaking of transitioning, Vancouver also announced a number of other changes:

The Hockey Operations department also named Chris Gear Vice President and General Counsel, Vancouver Canucks and Canucks Sports & Entertainment (CS&E). Judd Brackett was named Director of Amateur Scouting, Ryan Johnson was named Assistant Director Player Development and Mike Addesa joins the club as an Amateur Scout. The Human Performance department named Rick Celebrini Director, Rehabilitation and Jon Sanderson as Head Athletic Therapist.

Sens want to see if Hoffman ‘can do it again’

Mike Hoffman
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The Ottawa Senators got almost exactly what they wanted from Mike Hoffman’s arbitration ruling — and it could cost them.

Hoffman will earn $2 million next season, which is significantly less than what you would expect a player to make after scoring 27 goals and 48 points. But there’s a difference between Hoffman and Marcus Johansson, who had 47 points last season and was awarded nearly twice as much in arbitration: The sample size.

Hoffman only had 29 games worth of NHL experience going into the 2014-15 campaign so whether or not he can maintain or build upon his 48-point campaign is in question. Of course, the same could be said for Stone, who had 64 points in his first full NHL campaign and received a three-year, $10.5 million deal from Ottawa, but Senators assistant GM Pierre Dorion feels there are some noteworthy differences between the two young forwards.

“Mike’s road to the NHL has been a bit longer than Mark Stone,” Dorion told the Ottawa Citizen. “Stone was one of our best players in the second half last year and his play never tailed off. Mike’s play tailed off a bit in the second half (two goals in the last 16 games) and we want to see if Mike can do it again … we have a lot of confidence and faith Mike can do that next year.”

If Hoffman does do it again though, then the sample size arguments will weaken. At that point he’ll be in line for a considerable raise and a mid or long-term deal would likely come with a higher price tag than it would have been this summer.

Canucks ink Brandon Sutter to five-year, $21.875 million extension

Brandon Sutter
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The Canucks believe recently acquired Brandon Sutter is a “foundation piece” and now they’ve ensured that he’ll be spending his prime years with the team.

Vancouver announced that Sutter has agreed to a five-year, $21.875 million contract extension. He still has a season remaining on his two-year, $6.6 million deal, so Sutter is now under Vancouver’s control through 2020-21.

Sutter, 26, is a two-way center that scored 21 goals and 33 points in 80 contests with Pittsburgh last season while playing primarily on the Penguins’ third line. He has 98 goals and 185 points in 495 career games.

The Canucks acquired him on July 28 along with a third-round draft pick in exchange for forward Nick Bonino, defenseman Adam Clendening and a second-round pick.

In Vancouver, Sutter is projected to play on the second line so that 20-year-old Bo Horvat is facing less pressure.

Poker star Daniel Negreanu plans to buy slice of Vegas franchise

Daniel Negreanu
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Daniel Negreanu has made a fortune playing Poker and he plans to put some of that money towards buying a portion of Bill Foley’s Las Vegas NHL franchise.

Of course, that franchise doesn’t exist yet and while the league plans to focus exclusively on bids from Foley and Quebecor (Quebec City), there’s no guarantee that the NHL will expand at all in the near future. Still, Negreanu would put the odds of Las Vegas being granted a team — which he thinks should be called the Rat Pack — at 99.9%.

“I just don’t see it not happening,” he told the Toronto Sun. “We have a solid owner, an arena (nearing completion on the Strip with 17,500 seats for hockey) and we sold 13,000 season tickets.

“Vegas has 2.2 million people. It’s a sports town. We’ve been starving for a professional franchise of any kind for many years.”

Negreanu added that in addition to owning a stake in the franchise, he has interest in having a hockey talk show.

If Las Vegas gets a team, it’s possible that will begin play as early as 2016-17.

Related: Quebecor seeks partners in Quebec City bid

Seguin on 2014-15: ‘We felt we could outscore every team’

Tyler Seguin
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The Dallas Stars already had a dynamic one-two punch in Jamie Benn and Tyler Seguin when they added Jason Spezza last summer. Having that trio leading the charge offensively created a lot of hype about the team going into the 2014-15 campaign and listening to Seguin, it sounds like they bought into it to their detriment.

“We felt we had all these top players, all this firepower that could score a ton of goals. Automatically in training camp we were scoring a ton, but we weren’t focusing on defense,” Seguin told Sportsnet.

“That’s not the on the coaches or GMs at all. That was all on us. We felt we could outscore every team.”

In their first eight games, the Stars had scored a remarkable 28 goals and yet they were still a so-so 4-2-2 because they had surrendered as many markers. Then their offense trailed off briefly and it became apparent they weren’t ready to win low scoring games. Through Dec. 31, the Stars had a 17-14-5 record, but had only won three times when scoring two or fewer goals. By that point they were ninth in goals scored (106) and the fourth worst team in goals allowed (117).

“We were scoring a lot but not winning games because we can’t play defense,” Seguin said. “Last year, our start was terrible. I don’t think we had the right attitude in training camp, and I think that’s going to be a huge stressing point [this] September.”

Dallas has once again had an active summer, adding forward Patrick Sharp, defensemen Johnny Oduya and Stephen Johns, and goaltender Antti Niemi. This is a team with plenty of potential, but they also have a lot to prove.