Author: Ryan Dadoun


Boudreau doesn’t feel Game 7 record is reflective of anything


After losing the Western Conference Final to the Chicago Blackhawks, Ducks coach Bruce Boudreau’s record in Game 7s has dropped to 1-6. He’s the only head coach in NHL history with six Game 7 losses to his name and he has the unwanted distinction of leading the only two teams that have ever been eliminated at home in Game 7 for three consecutive years: the Washington Capitals and now Anaheim Ducks.

As previously mentioned, at best, Boudreau has been unlucky to the point of being a significant statistical anomaly. At worst, he’s the link the correlation suggests he is. As far as he’s concerned, he’s not the cause of those defeats.

“I got to believe that it isn’t (reflective of anything),” Boudreau said when the topic of his record in Game 7s was brought up during an interview with Sportsnet’s Fan 590. “People love to relay bad stats to people, but seven games have gone to a Game 7. I don’t win them and I don’t think I’m losing them.”

He also noted that he’s won Game 7s in the ECHL and AHL. “So it’s not a question of me, I think.”

He remains optimistic about the Ducks’ future. He likes the nucleus they already have and noted that the team is young with plenty of players that should be able to build off of this lengthy playoff run. This has been an important experience for 25-year-old goaltender Frederik Andersen in particular.

After having lost to Chicago, he feels that the Blackhawks’ experience was a big asset for them in this series. Going into 2015-16, Anaheim will be in a better position in that regard.


The Ducks shouldn’t hit the panic button

PHT Morning Skate: Cooper’s journey from Legal Eagles to Stanley Cup Final

Jon Cooper

PHT’s Morning Skate takes a look around the world of hockey to see what’s happening and what we’ll be talking about around the NHL world and beyond.

The story of Jon Cooper before he was the head coach of the Tampa Bay Lightning. (Tampa Bay Times)

As you might imagine, Puck Daddy has been among those previewing the Stanley Cup Final. They’ve comparing all the categories you would expect like goaltending and forwards, but they also have a section on aesthetics, which includes the anthem singers. (Puck Daddy)

The argument for trading Rick Nash. (New York Post)

Patrick Kane feels Chicago hasn’t “done anything yet” except take “a great step” by winning Game 7 against the Anaheim Ducks. (CSN Chicago)

Tampa Bay might not be a traditional hockey market, but that doesn’t mean that the Lightning aren’t a popular team. (Raw Charge)

Shane Doan threw out the first pitch at the Arizona Diamondbacks’ game. (

He also talked about social media and the Coyotes’ upcoming jerseys during an in-game interview. (

Battered defense: Rangers’ Staal, McDonagh, Girardi, Yandle all played injured

Dan Girardi

The New York Rangers defense was anything but healthy by the time Game 7 of the Eastern Conference Final rolled around. While injury information is a closely guarded secret during the playoffs, now that the Rangers’ run is over, the team is willing to open up about what they were battling through.

Marc Staal played in all 19 postseason games despite suffering a hairline fracture in his ankle near the end of the regular season. He logged 20:40 minutes per game in the playoffs, but finished with just one assist and a team-worst minus-eight rating, per the Bergen Record.

Ryan McDonagh also played with a fractured bone as he injured his right foot during Game 4 of the Eastern Conference Final. He logged 17:33 minutes in the final contest of that series.

Blueliners Dan Girardi and Keith Yandle suffered a grade 1 MCL and a shoulder sprain respectively. Girardi was injured in Game 4 versus the Lightning, but Yandle’s been hurt since Game 2 of the first round.

Yandle led all Rangers defensemen with 11 points in 19 contests. He also posted a plus-seven rating and averaged 18:00 minutes. Girardi finished second on the team in ice time with an average of 21:37 minutes per game.