Mike Miller

I am the Senior Director for editorial for NBCSports.com.

Canada rallies, stuns U.S. in OT to win women’s hockey gold

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In women’s hockey, there is no bigger prize than Olympic gold medals.

On Thursday, the U.S. was fewer than five minutes from achieving the ultimate prize, before Canada stormed back with two late goals to send the contest to sudden death overtime, where Marie-Philip Poulin scored the goal that brought gold medals to Canada.

For Canada, it’s their fourth consecutive gold medals in women’s Olympic hockey.

VIDEO: Watch the shot that hit the post

For the U.S., it is their second straight silver medals.

The Canadians pulled within 2-1 when Brianne Jenner scored with less than four minutes to go in regulation. A short time later, they opted to pull goalie Shannon Szabados from the net – only to have an American shot fired from deep within their zone toward the open goal.

The puck hit the left post. Canada was still alive.

And with 55 seconds remaining in regulation, they pulled even as Poulin – who scored both goals in the Canadians’ 2-0 gold medal win over the U.S. four years ago in Vancouver – lit the lamp.

The game then went to overtime, which featured a series of penalties that left the Canadians with an eventual 5-on-3 advantage. At the 8:10 mark, Poulin struck again and zipped a quick shot into the net.

The heroine of Vancouver became the heroine of Sochi.

MORE: Watch the FULL REPLAY of today’s U.S.-Canada women’s hockey gold medal game

source:
Team USA’s Anna Schleper (15) skates off the ice after Canada’s gold-medal winning goal in OT. Photo: AP.

WOMEN’S HOCKEY – GOLD MEDAL GAME
CANADA 3, UNITED STATES 2 (OT)

Scoring Summary
Second Period
USA – Meghan Duggan (Jocelyne Lamoureux), 11:57 – USA 1-0

Third Period
USA – Alex Carpenter (Hilary Knight, Kelli Stack), 2:01 – USA 2-0
CAN – Brianne Jenner (Meaghan Mikkelson, Jocelyne Larocque), 16:34 – USA 2-1
CAN – Marie-Philip Poulin (Rebecca Johnston, Haley Irwin), 19:05 – TIE 2-2

Overtime
CAN – Poulin (Laura Fortino), 8:10 – CAN 3-2

Goaltenders
CAN – Shannon Szabados, 27 saves on 29 shots
USA – Jessie Vetter, 28 saves on 31 shots

Blues’ trip to Yale to support Schwartz all ‘about family’

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NEW HAVEN, Conn. – In the dressing room of the Yale women’s hockey team, No. 17 still hangs in its proper stall. One day a year, the jersey is brought out rinkside and hung behind the home bench at Ingalls Rink, a reminder that Mandi Schwartz is always present at her team’s hockey games.

Friday night in New Haven, the Schwartz family presence was never greater. For the first time, Mandi’s brother Jaden was there in the rink his sister loved – and the kid brother brought a posse. Every one of Jaden’s St. Louis Blues teammates, along with coach Ken Hitchcock and GM Doug Armstrong, took a timeout from their four-game road trip to attend the “White Out for Mandi,” the annual Yale game that honors Jaden’s late sister, a Bulldog hockey player who died in 2011 following a 28-month fight with a rare form of leukemia.

Call it an unconventional way for St. Louis to celebrate an important bounceback win at Madison Square Garden on Thursday night, or to prepare for a road-trip finale at Nassau Coliseum on Saturday afternoon. All that seemed almost trivial to the Blues players who perched in a corner section of Ingalls, wearing their road white jerseys for the White Out and chatting up awestruck youth hockey players – many of whom had been at the rink for hours after watching the Blues practice there in the afternoon.

Whether those youth players or the Blues were more pleased to be there, it was sometimes hard to tell.

“It’s fun to have these little breaks in the season, break the routine a little bit,” said defenseman Kevin Shattenkirk, the New Rochelle, N.Y., native who scored the tiebreaking goal to beat the Rangers on Thursday, and who played youth hockey himself at Ingalls Rink. “But more than anything, to be here for [Jaden] and help him out and help his family out – really, we’re not doing much, we’re just trying to be a great supporting cast for Jaden.”

Jaden Schwartz was drafted by St. Louis in June 2010, some 10 months before his sister succumbed to acute myeloid leukemia, a cancer of the white blood cells for which Mandi needed, but never could find, a donor match for a bone marrow or stem cell transplant.

This season, Jaden, a 5-foot-10, 190-pound winger, has 16 goals and 35 points as a 21-year-old – Thursday’s was his 100th NHL game – for a Blues team that is by all indications a Stanley Cup contender. So when the NHL schedule came out last summer, his parents, Rick and Carol, set out to plan the fourth annual White Out – which raised funds for the Mandi Schwartz Foundation – around the Blues’ visit to the three New York-area teams. (New Haven is about 70 miles from New York City.)

“We expected maybe two or three buddies to come and join us for a game,” Rick Schwartz said. “But when Doug Armstrong said the whole team’s coming, and they’re going to be supporting Jaden … I see them here together, I’m glad they’re here by Jaden’s side today. This is a tough day for him.”

Jaden, meanwhile, was “shocked” by his teammates’ gesture. “I didn’t know what to expect,” he said. “I knew I was going to come, and maybe I’d bring some teammates, but it just kind of escalated, and one day, the whole team is coming. Yeah, shocked. And it means a lot.”

In between the Blues’ practice and the Yale game (a 2-2 tie with Brown), Jaden spent his first trip to Mandi’s campus on a Rick-and-Carol-guided tour of his sister’s dorm, and some of her classrooms. While the attention drawn to Mandi’s foundation, as well as the marrow donor drives she inspired, in conjunction with the “Be The Match” registry, is welcome, Jaden said he was looking forward to a bit of quiet reflection, to sit by Mandi’s locker that the team still keeps intact, “to get away and walk around.”

The Blues’ own getaway takes them to Long Island on Saturday, where a victory would give them a 3-1-0 road trip and help wash away the taste of Tuesday’s 7-1 thumping in New Jersey. Or maybe that sour taste is already gone.

“I think all of us, we get used to the [NHL] lifestyle, and at times you lose sight of other factors that are important in life,” Armstrong said while his Blues practiced before about 300 fans. “To get to come here, you realize what this is for, what this means.”

“You know, we first started looking at [Jaden] when he was 17 years old,” Hitchcock said. “We watched him play at Colorado College, we’ve watched him grow up in the organization. He’s a teammate, he’s a friend. This is about family.”

(Photo credit: Sam Rubin, Yale Sports Publicity)

Blues’ road trip taking a personal detour to Yale

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The St. Louis Blues are in the midst of a four-game road trip, four stops in the East that constitute their longest trip of the season. They’ve decided to add a fifth stop, which becomes the most important one of all.

On Friday, the night before their trip-closing matinee on Long Island, the Blues will trek up to New Haven, Conn., and take in a hockey game, the Yale-Brown women’s match (7 p.m. ET) that will be better known as the “White Out for Mandi.” It is a night to honor the late Yale hockey player Mandi Schwartz, who died in 2011 at age 23 following a 28-month battle with acute myeloid leukemia – and whose fight inspired a drive to enlarge North America’s registry of potential bone marrow donors that began with Mandi’s teammates and spread well beyond the Yale community.

Friday’s game – which will follow an afternoon practice that the Blues have moved to Yale’s Ingalls Rink – will have the entire Blues team in attendance. They’ll also throw their support behind a young teammate. Jaden Schwartz is a 21-year-old St. Louis forward, and Mandi’s kid brother. The Blues drafted Jaden with the 14th pick in 2010, 10 months before Mandi died; he is enjoying a breakout season this year, with 16 goals and 35 points for a Blues team that stands in second place in the Western Conference and is widely expected to contend for the franchise’s first Stanley Cup.

In the meantime, Friday will be Jaden’s first visit to the campus where Mandi entered school in 2006, his first chance to skate on the rink where she played and to see her locker – which the Yale women’s team has kept intact ever since she took leave to fight her illness.

Jaden was able to attend the annual game dedicated to his sister because the Blues were serendipitously scheduled to be in the area; when his teammates heard of his plan, they decided they would all join him.

“A no-brainer,” Blues GM Doug Armstrong called it.

Friday’s game will raise funds for the Mandi Schwartz Foundation, and the Blues’ practice will be open to the public. In April, Yale will hold the sixth annual Mandi Schwartz Marrow Donor Registration Drive, which has been held each spring since Mandi’s diagnosis.

More details on the event can be found here.

(Photo courtesy Yale Athletics)

News and notes: Do-or-die time for Bruins

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Game 6: Chicago Blackhawks at Boston Bruins, 8 p.m. ET (watch on NBC and live online) – Blackhawks lead series, 3-2

Tonight in Game 6 at TD Garden, the Blackhawks will try to win their fifth Stanley Cup title in their 87th NHL season, while the Bruins will try to avoid elimination and force a Game 7 in Chicago on Wednesday evening.

Patrice Bergeron, who leads the Bruins with four goals this series and is tied for the team lead with David Krejci with nine goals this postseason, will likely be a game-time decision after suffering an undisclosed “body” injury in Game 5. Bergeron left the game after playing only 49 seconds in the second period and was taken to a local hospital for observation. He was released Saturday night and traveled home with the team Sunday morning. If Bergeron is unable to play in Game 6, head coach Claude Julien may have a difficult challenge putting together his forward lines. Carl Soderberg, who made his NHL postseason debut on the fourth line with Rich Peverley and Shawn Thornton in Game 5, could be slotted on the second line alongside Brad Marchand and Jaromir Jagr. Another leading candidate would be Tyler Seguin, who centered the line with Marchand and Jagr when Bergeron missed six games with a concussion in early April.

The Hawks also face a possible injury dilemma. Jonathan Toews, who edged Bergeron for the Selke Trophy as the top defensive forward this season, missed the entire third period after absorbing a hard hit to the shoulder region – one of 53 hits registered by the Bruins in Game 5 – by defenseman Johnny Boychuk in the attacking zone. The team is optimistic that Toews’ “upper-body injury” will not force him out of Game 6, but if he is unable to play, former Junior Bruin and Boston College Eagle Ben Smith may be reinserted into the lineup. Smith replaced the injured Marian Hossa in Game 3, but had zero points in 10:23 of ice time.

The Blackhawks, who are 18-4 overall (8-2 on the road) in Games 5-7 under Joel Quenneville since he took over as the head coach during the 2007-08 season, clinched their two most-recent Stanley Cup titles – 1961 and 2010 – on the road. The Bruins, however, have recently been in this situation before in the Cup Final. The B’s were down three-games-to-two to the Canucks in 2011, won Game 6 at home (5-2), then captured the Cup in Vancouver two nights later.

SOMETHING HAS TO GIVE

  • The Blackhawks have won five straight postseason Game 6s on the road, including a 4-3 defeat of the Red Wings in the Western Conference Semifinal series on May 27 (last loss: May 1995 at TOR).
  • The Bruins have won four straight postseason Game 6s at home (last loss: May 1998 vs. WSH).

DID YOU KNOW?

On Jan. 19, the Chicago Blackhawks opened their regular season with a 5-2 defeat of the Los Angeles Kings. With a win tonight or in Game 7, the Hawks could become only the second team since the NHL gained control of the Cup in 1927 to open their season against the reigning Stanley Cup champions, and finish it by raising the Cup themselves. The Detroit Red Wings began their 2007-08 season by defeating the reigning Cup champs, the Anaheim Ducks, 3-2 in a shootout. (It was the Ducks’ third game of the season.)

Note: The 2005-06 Carolina Hurricanes began their winning campaign by knocking off the most recent (2004) Cup champions, the Tampa Bay Lightning, 5-2. However, the title was considered vacant due to the cancellation of the 2004-05 season.

LINKS

  • Injury to Patrice Bergeron hurts all of hockey [Boston Herald]
  • Bruins radar having trouble locating Blackhawks [National Post]
  • Blackhawks finding an answer for Zdeno Chara [New York Times]
  • Hawks know final victory will be toughest one to get [Chicago Sun-Times]
  • With or without Toews or Bergeron, it’s been an epic series [Globe & Mail]
  • Words take on special meaning at Stanley Cup Final [ESPN]

The Morning Skate: What’s next in wild series?

News and notes entering tonight’s Stanley Cup Final showdown in Chicago.

Game 5: Boston Bruins at Chicago Blackhawks, 8 p.m. ET (watch on NBC or live online) – Series tied, 2-2

For the fourth time in the last five years – and 23rd time since the best-of-seven playoff format was introduced in 1939 – the Stanley Cup Final is knotted at two games apiece after four games. (It is also the 10th time that each team has won at home and away in the first four games of a Cup Final series.) The team winning Game 5 has gone on to win the Cup 15 of the 22 previous times, adding weight to tonight’s Game 5 at the United Center.

There were as many goals scored in regulation (10) of Game 4 as the first three games of the series combined, before Blackhawks defenseman Brent Seabrook ended it 9:51 into overtime, his second OT-winner of the postseason. Tuukka Rask’s home shutout streak reached a franchise-record 193:16, but then the Bruins goaltender proceeded to allow six goals for only the second time in his career. His league-leading goals-against average rose from 1.64 to 1.83 in the game. After giving up five goals, Blackhawks goalie Corey Crawford’s GAA climbed from 1.74 to 1.86.

After combining for one assist in the first three games playing on separate lines, the Blackhawks’ reconstructed top line of Bryan Bickell – Jonathan Toews – Patrick Kane broke out in Game 4, combining for two goals and three assists. The Hawks improved to 3-0 all-time in the playoffs when Toews and Kane each scored a goal. On the flip side, the Bruins’ third line of Daniel Paille – Chris Kelly – Tyler Seguin, which lay behind three of four Boston goals in Games 2 and 3, were held off the scoresheet. Patrice Bergeron had two goals, his third and fourth of the series, which leads all skaters.

No major lineup changes are expected on either side for Game 5. Marian Hossa, who played 19:07 in Game 4 after being scratched the game before with an undisclosed injury, missed Friday’s practice, but will play. Nick Leddy, who had career-lows of four shifts and 2:37 ice time in Game 4, should also see an increase in ice time. Judging by Friday’s practice at TD Garden, the Bruins are expected to insert Carl Soderberg on the fourth line with Rich Peverley and Shawn Thornton, in place of Kaspars Daugavins. The Swedish first-year winger, who had two assists in six regular-season games, would be making his NHL postseason debut. You might recall that earlier this postseason, B’s defensemen Matt Bartkowski and Torey Krug scored their first-career NHL playoff goals without having tallied a regular-season goal. Krug did so in his playoff debut.

DID YOU KNOW?

The cumulative overtime played in three games this series is 75:47. That is already the second-most overtime played in a Stanley Cup Final series, after the 1931 Final (Chicago vs. Montreal, 78:40), and the most played in any postseason series since 2008 (Dallas vs. San Jose, Western Conference Quarterfinals, 78:19).

DID YOU KNOW?

Jaromir Jagr, who became the 21st player (and 19th skater) to appear in 200 playoff games, assisted on both on Patrice Bergeron’s goals in Game 4 and now has 199 career postseason points. Jagr has waited 21 years and 21 days since his last goal in the Stanley Cup Final, but with ten assists, he reached double digits in points for the tenth time in postseason play. That is tied for the fourth-most in NHL history.

Player

# of seasons w/ 10+ points

Seasons

Career single-season high

Wayne Gretzky

14

1980-1997

47 (1985)

Mark Messier

14

1980-1997

34 (1988)

Jean Beliveau

11

1954-1971

22 (1971)

Jaromir Jagr

10

1991-2013

24 (1992)

Glenn Anderson

10

1981-1996

27 (1987)

Paul Coffey

10

1981-1999

37 (1985)

LINKS

·         Corey Crawford not worried about his ‘weak’ glove side [Yahoo]

·         Tuukka Rask the ultimate straight shooter [Boston Herald]

·         Jaromir Jagr’s career coming full circle in Boston [ESPN]

·         No letter on sweater, Brent Seabrook emerging as Blackhawks’ natural leader [CBC]

·         Patrick Sharp flying under the radar as goals leader [Chicago Sun-Times]

·         Blackhawks trying to treat Zdeno Chara as invisible man [SportsNet]

·         VIDEO: Bruins fans gather to wish team luck in sendoff [NESN]

·         Jaromir Jagr’s Cup pursuit keeps fans in Prague awake [New York Times]