Jason Brough

AP

Oshie’s contract status underscores urgency in Washington

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The way he keeps scoring, T.J. Oshie‘s next contract isn’t getting any smaller.

The 30-year-old winger was today named the NHL’s third star of the week, after racking up six points (3G, 3A) in three games for the red-hot Washington Capitals.

Oshie now has 31 points (17G, 14A) in 38 games. A pending unrestricted free agent, he’ll no doubt be looking for a raise beyond his current cap hit of $4.175 million.

One comparable contract is Andrew Ladd‘s seven-year, $38.5 million deal with the Islanders.

Loui Eriksson‘s six-year, $36 million deal with the Canucks is another.

And one more for good measure: David Backes‘ five-year, $30 million deal with the Bruins.

All three of those contracts have a cap hit of around, or exactly, $6 million. Ladd and Eriksson are a year older than Oshie, while Backes is two years older. They’re all reliable veteran wingers, just like Oshie.

Now, the Caps could always try and convince Oshie to take a home-town discount. They may even be able to keep him without a discount.

That being said, their No. 1 priority has to be getting Evgeny Kuznetsov, a pending restricted free agent, locked up. And they also need to keep in mind John Carlson, their No. 1 defenseman who can become unrestricted in the summer of 2018.

“We’re going to have some decisions to make as far as veteran players, and our young guys are going to be due for some pay raises,” Caps GM Brian MacLellan said last season.

When he said it, MacLellan saw his team in a “two-year window.”

Alas, only one year of that window remains. Hence, the urgency to finally win the Stanley Cup this spring.

Like Oshie, Justin Williams and Karl Alzner are pending UFAs.

And like Kuznetsov, Andre Burakovsky, Brett ConnollyDmitry Orlov, Nate Schmidt, and Philipp Grubauer are pending RFAs.

The Caps host Carolina tonight.

Related: Kuznetsov sets table for Jakub Vrana’s first NHL goal

A really bad day for NHL ice

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In two different NHL arenas, there were two emphatic complaints about the ice on Sunday.

The first complaint was launched by Rangers coach Alain Vigneault, after his team defeated Detroit, 1-0, in overtime at Joe Louis Arena.

“I know the ice was the same for both teams, but the quality of the ice today was just horrendous,” Vigneault said, per the New York Post. “When you can’t put two passes together because the puck is bouncing all over the place, makes it very hard on both players, who have some skill. It makes it hard to put that skill on display.”

The second complaint came from Canucks goalie Ryan Miller, following a 3-2 loss to Chicago at United Center.

“This ice is the worst ice I’ve seen in my career,” said the 36-year-old netminder, a guy who’s been in the NHL since 2002.

Perhaps Miller was upset about the loss, but the winning goalie at United Center was Corey Crawford, and Crawford himself is no fan of the ice in many NHL buildings.

“I’ve always thought the real issue (with the lack of scoring) isn’t goalie equipment,” he said recently, per the Chicago Sun-Times. “The issue is ice. If you can make ice like the way it is in Colorado, the way it is in Washington, Edmonton — you make the conditions like that for every game in every rink, guys are going to score. … Massive difference between battling with the puck and making sure it’s going to be on the ice, and just playing. … You watch a game where the ice is just horse[bleep], it makes a huge difference.”

We wonder if Crawford has heard that the ice in Edmonton isn’t actually that good anymore.

Outspoken agent Allan Walsh weighed in on the topic Sunday.

“Hearing from players that generally the quality of ice league-wide is getting worse,” Walsh tweeted. “Over time, can lead to groin, back and hip issues.”

Now, to be fair, it’s not an easy task, making good ice in buildings that also host basketball and concerts and whatever else.

But if the quality of the playing surface is, indeed, getting worse, then it’s a problem that the NHL needs to address. Whether it’s sending more experts to help, or even cracking down on teams whose buildings don’t meet the standard, something needs to be done, because the entertainment product is at stake.

P.S. — Sunday in Pittsburgh, there weren’t any emphatic complaints about the playing surface at PPG Paints Arena, but there was a lengthy ice-related delay that sent the Penguins and Bruins to the dressing rooms with 6:26 remaining in the first period.

Pens d-man Ian Cole called it “a pretty good hole” in the ice.

“They got it slush-filled, and then the ref came over and checked it and it was just slush,” Cole said, per the Post-Gazette. “It wasn’t even close to ice, so they were like, ‘OK, we need to do a little more work on it.'”

Related:

Barclays Center ice was ‘unplayable’

The Sharks are going to try and fix their ‘garbage’ ice

Injured Silfverberg skips trip with Ducks

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ANAHEIM, Calif. (AP) Forward Jakob Silfverberg will not travel on the Anaheim Ducks’ upcoming two-game road trip to Minnesota and Winnipeg while recovering from an upper-body injury.

The Ducks are leaving for Minnesota on Friday without Silfverberg, who was injured late in their 2-1 victory over Colorado on Thursday.

From the Los Angeles Times:

Silfverberg left Thursday’s game in the third period, shortly after a hit from Colorado’s Nikita Zadorov, and is considered day-to-day. Silfverberg’s head is believed to have hit the ice but it is not known if he suffered a head injury.

Anaheim recalled right wing Corey Tropp and defenseman Shea Theodore from its AHL affiliate in San Diego.

Silfverberg has 13 goals and 16 assists in a strong season with the Pacific Division-leading Ducks. The Swede is on pace to surpass his career highs in goals and assists.

Silfverberg has teamed up with All-Star center Ryan Kesler and Andrew Cogliano on the Ducks’ most effective line this season.

Pre-game reading: Is better ice the key to more scoring?

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— Up top, the resurrection of Alexander Radulov has been quite the story in Montreal.

Corey Crawford has an interesting theory on how to increase scoring in the NHL. It’s not smaller goalie equipment; it’s better ice. “I’ve always thought the real issue isn’t goalie equipment. The issue is ice. If you can make ice like the way it is in Colorado, the way it is in Washington, Edmonton — you make the conditions like that for every game in every rink, guys are going to score. … You watch a game where the ice is just horse[bleep] — it makes a huge difference. ” (Chicago Sun-Times)

— Speaking of horse[bleep] ice…the New York Islanders! Ryan Kennedy of The Hockey News think the Isles need to see what they’ve got in youngsters like Michael Dal Colle and Josh Ho-Sang. Kennedy writes: “Admittedly, I’ve only watched Bridgeport once this season, but I don’t think that giving them a couple of games in The Show would foment a sense of entitlement – think of it as motivation. A call-up in 2016-17 is no guarantee of a roster spot in 2017-18.” The Isles could certainly be an interesting team to watch as the trade deadline approaches. Veteran forwards like Nikolay Kulemin and Jason Chimera aren’t going to be part of the future. If Garth Snow can move their salary, or even part of their salary, it might be wise to do it. (The Hockey News)

Marian Hossa is the 10th-oldest player in the NHL. How has the 38-year-old winger maintained such a high level of play? The answer: Hard work. “He’s one of the best professionals, the way he carries himself, prepares every day,” teammate Ryan Hartman told Sports Illustrated. “He’s always here early, even after games he’s in the gym doing some type of stuff to keep his body in shape. The way he presents himself, it helps us young guys, for sure, to learn from him.” (SI)

— A profile of Nolan Patrick, the likely first overall pick in the 2017 NHL draft. Writes Postmedia’s Michal Traikos: “Some have called him the second coming of Anze Kopitar, because he has off-the-charts hockey IQ and already plays a mature, two-way game. With a dad (Steve) and an uncle (James) who both played in the NHL, Patrick understands the subtleties of the game. When he was 16, the Wheat Kings matched him up against Leon Draisaitl, who was two years older and already drafted, in the WHL final.” (National Post)

— Patrick was, indeed, the first overall pick in Adam Kimelman’s mock draft over at NHL.com. The second pick was another center, Gabriel Vilardi. The third was also a center, Nico Hischier. In fact, of Kimelman’s top 10 picks, six were listed as centers. While there may be no obvious, future superstar like Connor McDavid or Auston Matthews in this summer’s draft, there’s still plenty of talent to be had — especially down the middle, apparently. (NHL.com)

Enjoy the games!

P.K. Subban expected to play Friday

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P.K. Subban is ready to play again. The Nashville Predators announced today that he’s been activated off injured reserve and will be in the lineup tonight in Edmonton.

Subban has missed the last 16 games with what the club would only call an upper-body injury (reportedly a herniated disc). The Preds had hoped he’d be back sooner, but “sometimes this is what happens with injuries,” said GM David Poile.

Nashville has won four of its last five games and has moved back into a playoff spot. The Preds have also been without defenseman Roman Josi the last three games. Rosi is still on injured reserve with what he’s said is a concussion.

Subban had 17 points (7G, 10A) in 29 games before he went on IR. The Preds play tonight in Edmonton and Sunday in Minnesota before returning home to face the Sabres on Tuesday.