Jason Brough

Peters won’t face charges in youth hockey brawl

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BUFFALO, N.Y. (AP) Former Buffalo Sabres player Andrew Peters won’t face charges following an on-ice brawl involving the youth hockey team he coaches.

The Erie County district attorney’s office and Buffalo police began looking into the Saturday fight after video appeared to show Peters reaching across the Buffalo Junior Sabres’ bench and shoving to the ice a player from the Hamilton, Ontario, team.

District Attorney John Flynn said Tuesday the parents of the teenage player don’t want to pursue criminal charges against Peters, so his office won’t take legal action.

Read more: Peters admits he did ‘not do a good job this weekend’

The 36-year-old Peters was suspended from coaching Buffalo’s 15-and-under team. Neither the Buffalo Junior Sabres nor Peters has responded to requests for comment.

Rangers get Brendan Smith from Detroit

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With Kevin Klein still dealing with back spasms and Dan Girardi expected to miss a couple of weeks with an ankle injury, the New York Rangers are reportedly in the process of acquiring defenseman Brendan Smith in a trade with the Detroit Red Wings.

TSN’s Bob McKenzie says the return to the Wings will be a second-round draft pick in 2018 and a third-round pick in 2017.

Update: The deal is official.

Smith, 28, is a pending unrestricted free agent. A left shot who can play the right side, he has two goals and three assists in 33 games this season while averaging 18:44 of ice time.

He had hoped to re-sign with the Wings.

“Do I want to go to free agency? I would rather have a contract, to be honest,” Smith said Monday, per NHL.com. “I would like to know where I am because I think becoming a free agent is the unknown and that can kind of be scary at the same time.

“All I know is that I would like to have a good contract with the Wings and be around. We’re kind of starting to go through that process. If that works out, or whether [GM Ken Holland] is maybe looking to move myself or somebody else, we’ll just have to wait and see.”

The Rangers recalled defenseman Steven Kampfer from the AHL this morning. Kampfer will play tonight against Washington, slotting in behind Nick Holden and Adam Clendening on the right side.

With Blues in ‘precarious playoff spot,’ it was time for Shattenkirk to go

If the St. Louis Blues were enjoying another season like they enjoyed last year, they wouldn’t have traded Kevin Shattenkirk.

But in the words of GM Doug Armstrong, the Blues are currently “in a precarious playoff spot,” so yesterday Shattenkirk was dealt to Washington for a haul that included a first-round draft pick in 2017 and 22-year-old forward Zach Sanford.

“It just felt that where we are and where we need to go, it was time to make a move,” Armstrong said.

“I think when we got through last year’s playoffs, knowing that we were going to be entering unrestricted free agency with a number of players over a two- or three-year span, we wanted to turn the tide over to a different core group of players, and this just continues down that path.”

Armstrong listed Alex Pietrangelo, Vladimir Tarasenko, Jaden Schwartz, Colton Parayko, and Robby Fabbri as parts of the new core.

“There’s change in this game,” said Armstrong. “All organizations go through it.”

The Blues enter tonight’s game against the Oilers just two points clear of the Kings for the second wild-card spot in the West.

Sens are ‘ecstatic’ to add Burrows

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The Ottawa Senators made Alex Burrows‘ contract extension official this morning.

The day after acquiring the 35-year-old forward from Vancouver, the Sens announced that Burrows had signed a two-year, $5 million extension with a 10-team no-trade clause.

Ottawa gave up 19-year-old prospect Jonathan Dahlen to get Burrows from the Canucks.

“I think we’ve become a tougher team to play against and with the acquisition of Alex Burrows we’ve become an even tougher team to play against,” said GM Pierre Dorion, per the Ottawa Sun. “We all know how games are at this time of the year and, hopefully, when our team gets in the playoffs, how they’re grinding, difficult games.

“Getting someone of Alex’s character is something we couldn’t turn (away from). Our players have done exactly what we’ve asked of them. They’ve played hard, they’ve played a system and we just felt it was time to add another piece. In Alex Burrows, we’re ecstatic to have that piece.”

After last night’s 5-1 loss in Tampa Bay, the Sens only have a four-point playoff cushion, so there’s still work to be done down the stretch.

Ottawa hosts Colorado Thursday.

Related: Canucks GM says he isn’t done after trading ‘heart and soul’ guy Burrows

Conditional trades ‘in vogue’ in the NHL

AP

The NHL trade deadline can make for some conflicting interests come playoff time.

No one outside Minnesota is cheering harder for the Wild than the Arizona Coyotes because they get a second-round pick if Martin Hanzal helps Minnesota reach the third round. The Tampa Bay Lightning would love nothing more than Ben Bishop leading the Los Angeles Kings to the Stanley Cup Final.

Conditional trades based on a team’s playoff success, and a player’s part in it, are all the rage right now in the NHL.

Already, four pre-deadline deals include draft picks contingent on how far a team goes in the playoffs. There were 13 such trades combined at the past four deadlines.

“It’s in vogue,” Florida Panthers president of hockey operations Dale Tallon said. “It’s a creative way of doing things. If you have success, you don’t mind paying more. If you’re successful and go deeper, you don’t mind giving up an extra asset or more of an asset.”

Trades conditional on playoff success sometimes happen in the NFL, like when the Minnesota Vikings acquired quarterback Sam Bradford from the Philadelphia Eagles last year, but they’re virtually nonexistent in other North American professional sports leagues outside of protected picks in the NBA. They’ve become commonplace in the NHL, in part because they’ve worked out swimmingly a few times.

When the Chicago Blackhawks won it all in 2015, they didn’t mind sending an extra second-round pick to the Flyers for Kimmo Timonen for reaching the Cup Final and the defenseman playing in at least half their games. A year earlier, the Kings gave the Columbus Blue Jackets an extra third-round pick to complete a trade for Marian Gaborik after the winger helped them win their second title in three seasons.

The Kings could give up as high as a second-round pick if Bishop wins them the Cup this season but wouldn’t surrender much of anything if they miss the playoffs. GM Dean Lombardi, who also made the 2014 Gaborik trade, called it a “common sense” way of getting a deal done.

“If I was making a deal here or something and (someone) says, `I’m giving five first-rounders and you’ll win the Cup,’ you’ll do it,” Lombardi said. “You don’t mind paying if your team has success.”

The same is true of the Anaheim Ducks, who would give the Dallas Stars a first-round pick instead of a second for Patrick Eaves if they reach the Western Conference final and the winger plays 50 percent or more of their games. After some haggling, Dallas GM Jim Nill said that was the final piece of getting the trade done.

The idea of contenders gambling on themselves makes all the sense in the world. But trade deadline sellers also like the concept.

The Coyotes were looking to get the best deal for Hanzal , so they bet on him contributing to the Wild’s success.

“We believe strongly that with Martin, Minnesota has a chance to do some things that could be pretty special, and we want to share in some of that upside,” Arizona GM John Chayka said. “We share in the risk, we share in the upside. It’s just a creative way to try and bridge the gap and get a deal done.”

Lombardi would love to make salaries and salary-cap hits contingent on playoff success because if a team goes further it’s also making more money along the way. But the league doesn’t allow that.

Maybe that’s for the best because these kinds of trades make things complicated. Vegas Golden Knights GM George McPhee, who sent a conditional pick to Florida in 1998 for Esa Tikkanen the year his Washington Capitals made the Cup Final, pointed out that those trades freeze a lot of potential draft picks that could be pieces of other trades.

“The difficulty in doing that is it ties up a lot of picks,” McPhee said. “If they’re encumbered you can’t use them.”

That hasn’t stopped the trend, though, with teams hedging their bets and playing it safe.

“You give yourself a little bit of a protection, too, if you don’t quite go as far as you think you will,” Tallon said.