Jason Brough

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Gostisbehere will be healthy scratch for third time this season

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Plus-minus can be a misleading statistic, with the “worst” ratings often belonging to the best players on bad teams.

Still, Shayne Gostisbehere can’t be liking the fact he’s minus-19 on the season. It was an especially frustrating January for the Flyers’ second-year defenseman, who went minus-11 in 12 games with no goals and four assists.

“I really don’t care about points or scoring goals. My first job is to play defense,” Gostisbehere said, per the Courier-Post. “Sometimes the way the pucks are going in the net I feel like I have bad luck, but again I can’t just use that as an excuse. I just look at that and say I can do a lot better myself.”

Gostisbehere has already been a healthy scratch twice this season, and it’s expected he’ll sit tonight at home to Montreal after Tuesday’s 5-1 loss in Carolina.

The 23-year-old was on the ice for the Hurricanes’ first goal. As you can see below, his teammates turned it over on the breakout, and he got caught trying to join a rush that never developed.

It was an ugly game for the Flyers, and there was plenty of blame to go around. But expect to see the more defensive-minded Nick Schultz enter the lineup to take Gostisbehere’s spot versus the Canadiens.

Another youngster, 19-year-old Travis Konecny, is also expected to sit tonight. He’ll be replaced by veteran winger Dale Weise.

Worst +/- in the NHL

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Pre-game reading: What does the future hold for Hitch?

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— Up top, it was a very emotional Doug Armstrong who announced the firing of his “best friend” today in St. Louis. It’s up to Mike Yeo now to turn the Blues around.

— As far as the future of Ken Hitchcock is concerned, there’s little question he’d draw interest if he wants to keep coaching. Writes TSN’s Gary Lawless: “I think he might be the perfect associate coach, the same role he held with Mike Babcock’s Team Canada staffs in Vancouver and Sochi. Let someone else deliver the daily message while still having access to all of Hitchcock’s knowledge, which has resulted in over 700 NHL wins, a Stanley Cup and a mantle full of international honors.” (TSN)

— More on the Blues from Sportsnet’s Elliotte Friedman, who writes in his latest 30 Thoughts column: “A few executives were surprised the Blues did not ‘invent’ an injury to Jake Allen rather than say he needed time off in the last couple of weeks to repair his confidence. I’m not in the business of ripping people for honesty. But a couple guys admitted they would have lied: ‘Harder to rebuild his confidence when you’re telling everyone he has to sit out because he’s lost it.'” (Sportsnet)

Opinions are varied when it comes to the new pants that NHL goalies will be forced to wear come Saturday, but Chicago’s Scott Darling is no fan of the change to a slimmer fit: “I think it’s a waste of time and money. But whatever the league feels they need to do.” The Blackhawks’ other netminder, Corey Crawford, has said the best way to increase scoring is to have better ice, not smaller goalie equipment. (Chicago Tribune)

— A Q&A with Carolina Hurricanes head coach Bill Peters, who played for Mike Babcock at Red Deer College when the two were in their 20s. “I was 23. He was 25. It was his first coaching job in North America. It was my third year in the league, called the Alberta Colleges Athletic Conference. If you can imagine, the coaches at the time were [current Canucks assistant] Perry Pearn, Mike Babcock and [former Penguins head coach] Mike Johnston. Three of those guys went on to coach in the NHL, out of five or six teams in the league. That was an opportunity to be around high-level thinkers of the game and learn from them, ask them questions and grow your passion for the game.” (Sports Illustrated)

— Speaking of Carolina, the Philadelphia Flyers were pretty bad there last night in a 5-1 loss. Said d-man Mark Streit: “If you have six shots on net after two periods, that’s just a devastating performance. It’s tough for me to explain it.” The Flyers finished with just 16 shots to the Hurricanes’ 28. Philly’s next game is tomorrow at home to Montreal, and the Canadiens will have Alex Galchenyuk back in their lineup. (CSN Philly)

Enjoy the games!

Getting healthier, Panthers send McIlrath and McCann to AHL

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Panthers defenseman Dylan McIlrath has cleared waivers and been assigned to Florida’s AHL affiliate in Springfield.

Forward Paul Thompson also cleared waivers, but he remains on the NHL roster for now. Instead, 20-year-old forward Jared McCann has been sent down.

The Panthers beat the Senators, 6-5, last night to move to within two points of a wild-card spot. It was the second game back for d-man Alex Petrovic, whose return knocked McIlrath even further down the depth chart.

Florida is still without key forwards Jonathan Huberdeau and Aleksander Barkov, though both have been skating and the latter’s return sounds imminent.

“I feel better every day,” Barkov said Monday, per the Sun-Sentinel. “I’m skating with the team and feel happy for that. It’s a lot more fun than skating by my own. I hope I could play soon.”

Florida’s next game is Friday at home to Anaheim.

The challenge for Yeo? Make better use of Blues’ speed

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Let’s face it, no matter what Mike Yeo does as head coach of the St. Louis Blues, no matter what changes he makes after today’s firing of Ken Hitchcock, no matter how well he motivates his players, the team isn’t going anywhere without better goaltending.

More than halfway through the season, Jake Allen and Carter Hutton both have save percentages below .900. Those two are the prime reason the Blues are barely clinging to a playoff spot. They are the epitome of the Harry Neale quote: “Goaltending is 75 percent of your hockey team. Unless you don’t have it, then it’s 100 percent.”

Now, you could certainly blame the general manager, Doug Armstrong, for not finding Allen a suitable backup after Brian Elliott was traded to Calgary. Hutton, 31, has never put up particularly good NHL numbers. He was decent last season in Nashville, but in a very limited role behind Pekka Rinne.

Allen is the starter, though, and he has to be better, plain and simple. That’s why the Blues also fired goalie coach Jim Corsi today, replacing him with Martin Brodeur and Ty Conklin. The hope is that Brodeur and Conklin can connect with Allen and somehow help him rediscover his form.

At the same time, Yeo will try to get the Blues to play faster and more aggressively — first, in their own end, and then on the attack.

“We want to be a team that’s structured,” Yeo said today, “but we want to defend quickly, we want to defend aggressively, and with that, I think what we’ll see is us having the ability to showcase our speed and our ability to get to the offensive zone and on the attack a bit quicker.”

If we can forget the goaltending for a moment, let’s focus on the phrase “showcase our speed.” Because the past few years, the Blues have been more big and heavy than fast. That was their identity. They were hard to play against. When they hit you, it hurt.

And then David Backes and Troy Brouwer left.

Looking back, there’s no doubt that the departures of those two veteran forwards changed the Blues’ identity.

Just ask Armstrong.

“I think what we’ve seen in the NHL this season is that it’s still a man’s league, and you still have to get to the hard areas to score,” he told the Post-Dispatch a couple of weeks ago. “But I think you have to play to how your roster is built. You don’t replace a Backes and a Brouwer with another Backes and Brouwer at a younger age, or if you do, we didn’t have those guys in our group.

“I don’t think you can ask Robby Fabbri to play the way David Backes did. I just think it’s unrealistic. So our coaches’ responsibility is to use their expertise to find different ways to play. We have to find different ways to get the same results. I think you need a good balance and we’re trying to find that balance.”

That responsibility now falls to Yeo. Perhaps he’ll be a better fit with the current roster than Hitchcock, who had success with the big-and-heavy Blues but didn’t get the same results with a speedier, more skilled group.

Again, though, the Blues first and foremost need better goaltending. They cannot be losing games, 7-3, when they only surrender 18 shots, which is exactly what they did a couple of weeks ago to Washington.

Yeo made clear today that Allen is the Blues’ goalie of the present, and also the future.

So expect Allen to get the start tomorrow against the high-scoring visitors from Toronto.

It won’t get any easier after that. On Saturday, the Blues host the Pittsburgh Penguins, and then it’s on the road for five games.

Related: Armstrong rips into Blues after firing his ‘best friend’

Wild trade minor-league forward to Senators

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The Minnesota Wild announced a minor trade today. They’ve sent forward Marc Hagel to the Ottawa Senators in exchange for future considerations.

Hagel was in his fourth season with the Iowa Wild. The undrafted 28-year-old has never played an NHL game. In 26 AHL contests this season, he has just two goals and five assists.

“Marc was an excellent competitor for us in Des Moines over the last four years,” said Iowa Wild GM Brent Flahr.  “He was a good teammate and an engaged ambassador to the game of hockey in central Iowa. He wanted a chance for a bigger role and we are currently a little crowded upfront to make that happen. He wants to play every night and we did the best we could to accommodate that for him.”

Hagel is a pending unrestricted free agent on a two-way contract. He’ll join a Binghamton team that sits last place in the AHL’s North Division with a record of 18-22-3.