Jason Brough

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Team USA takes issue with Kessel’s tweet

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Not surprisingly, Phil Kessel‘s tweet did not sit well with members of Team USA.

“Didn’t Phil have surgery?” Zach Parise said today, per Stephen Whyno of the Associated Press. “I don’t think he could even play, anyway. His tweet didn’t really make sense.”

David Backes added that certain tweets (Bobby Ryan had one as well) “have been read and I think will be remembered.”

In case you somehow missed it, Kessel tweeted after Team USA’s 4-2 loss to Canada last night: “Just sitting around the house tonight w my dog. Felt like I should be doing something important, but couldn’t put my finger on it.”

The tweet has since been retweeted over 64,000 times.

Kessel, of course, was not chosen to represent the United States at the World Cup, despite being named the best forward at the 2014 Olympics in Sochi.

He wasn’t the only USA Hockey alumnus to use social media to express displeasure with the Americans’ performance:

“Fact is we were constructed this way,” Backes argued, per Yahoo Sports. “We didn’t go out and play the right way and the players didn’t execute on the ice and I don’t know – criticism is going to be spread out. I’ll take my fair share, but we didn’t get the job done. Open season maybe for a little while here. We’re going to need to take the criticism. Listen to some, maybe block out others but in the end we didn’t get the job done and it didn’t fold out the way we wanted to. I still believe this is the way we needed to be built. We didn’t go out there and do it.”

Related: Tortorella defends Team USA’s roster, blames loss to Canada on ‘self-inflicted’ mistakes

Clarkson fails physical, won’t be ready for Jackets training camp

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David Clarkson has failed his physical and will not be with the Blue Jackets when they start training camp, reports Aaron Portzline of the Columbus Dispatch.

The 32-year-old winger has a lower-back injury, according to Jackets president of hockey ops John Davidson.

Injuries limited Clarkson, whose contract is insured, to just 23 games (2G, 2A) for the Jackets last season. He was traded to Columbus from Toronto in February of last year, in return for injured winger Nathan Horton (whose contract is not insured and who hasn’t played an NHL game in over two years).

Clarkson is signed through 2019-20 for a cap hit of $5.25 million, and the way his contract is structured makes it practically buyout-proof.  But if cap relief is required, the Jackets may now be able to place him on long-term injured reserve.

When, or if, he’ll be able to play again remains to be seen.

Report: Orlov to sign one-year deal with Caps, could get top-four role this season

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The Washington Capitals are on the verge of signing defenseman Dmitry Orlov to a one-year contract worth “in the neighborhood of $2.6 million,” according to the Washington Post. 

Orlov, 25, is a restricted free agent. He made $2.25 million last season, when he scored a career high-29 points in 82 games.

“I would like to stay [in Washington],” he said recently. “But I don’t know how it’s going to happen. We’ll see.”

From the Post’s report:

The reason the contract talks have taken this long likely has more to do with Orlov wanting a more substantial role with the team than disagreements over salary or term. Orlov averaged about 16 minutes per game last season, mostly playing on the third defensive pairing. He didn’t kill penalties, and his power play time was limited.

Throughout the summer, the Capitals’ coaching staff and management has repeatedly spoken of giving more responsibility to Orlov, potentially pairing him with Matt Niskanen or John Carlson in a top-four role. That would involve playing more minutes with more challenging defensive assignments. Though he wouldn’t be getting much of a raise on a one-year deal worth about $2.6 million, the sales pitch could be that he’d have an opportunity for more production as a top defenseman and then sign a more profitable deal in a year, when Washington is expected to have more salary cap space because Justin Williams, Daniel Winnik, T.J. Oshie and Karl Alzner will be hitting unrestricted free agency.

If Orlov does indeed get a top-four role on the left side, it could mean less ice time for 35-year-old Brooks Orpik, who still has three years left on his contract, with a cap hit of $5.5 million. And if it’s not Orpik that plays less, it will have to be Alzner.

Orlov is currently playing for Russia at the World Cup.

The biggest reason Canada wins? ‘It’s called players, really good players’

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Just like USA Hockey, so too was Hockey Canada criticized for leaving certain players off its World Cup roster.

Offensive defensemen P.K. Subban and Kris Letang were the big omissions, rejected because they shoot right-handed and/or didn’t have the full trust of the coaching staff. Instead, the Canadians went with Jake Muzzin and Jay Bouwmeester.

But after advancing to the semifinals of the World Cup, Hockey Canada has so far avoided the criticism that’s currently being heaped on USA Hockey. First of all, because the Canadians are winning. But also because, even without Subban and Letang, nobody looks at Canada’s roster and wonders if there’s enough skill. When Joe Thornton, Ryan O'Reilly and Matt Duchene are your fourth line, there’s clearly enough skill.

Hockey Canada, essentially, can afford to play it safe in certain instances.

For that reason, head coach Mike Babcock, who also coaches the Toronto Maple Leafs, is hesitant to take much credit for his success at the national-team level, which already includes two Olympic gold medals and may soon include a World Cup title.

“Sometimes we get way too caught up talking about structure and systems and all that, and it’s just the players are better,” Babcock said after last night’s 4-2 win that eliminated the Americans. “I had that same structure and we finished dead last last year. I was the worst coach in the National Hockey League, if you remember correct. So let’s put things in perspective. It’s called players, really good players. And when you’re fortunate that they let you coach really good players, you look like a pretty good coach sometimes.”

This isn’t to let John Tortorella or Dean Lombardi off the hook. The Americans’ biggest sin at the World Cup was’t losing to Canada; it was losing to Team Europe. The question USA Hockey should be asking is, Can we do better? And the answer to that is, yes.

As for the Canadians, they play Europe tonight for first place in Group A. After that, it’s on to the semifinals, where winning will be the only acceptable result for Babcock and his players.

“We just come to the event, we prepare for the games, we try to get better every day, and we try to win in the end,” said Babcock. “And being Canadian, you’re greedy. You think it’s your right to find a way to get ‘er done.”

Related: On the difference between ‘good’ and ‘big-time’ players

Tortorella defends Team USA’s roster, blames loss to Canada on ‘self-inflicted’ mistakes

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“We have practiced enough,” John Tortorella said yesterday. “We have talked enough, we have gone through all that process. Let’s play the damn game.”

Well, the damn game finished 4-2 for Team Canada tonight in Toronto, eliminating Tortorella’s Team USA from World Cup contention. With a whimper.

The winless Americans still have to play the winless Czechs on Thursday, but it will be a meaningless affair for both sides. Team Europe and Team Canada have both advanced to the semifinals. They’ll play each other tomorrow for first place in Group A.

For the Americans — who came into the best-on-best tournament trumpeting the slogan, “It’s time” — it was an embarrassing, demoralizing, dismal performance.

They lacked creativity on offense.

They had numerous defensive breakdowns.

They did not show much resilience.

They did not look like a team with a sound plan.

In two games, they were outscored by a 7-2 margin. On Saturday, in a game they couldn’t afford to lose, they were shut out by Team Europe, 3-0.

Now the blame game starts.

It begins with the coach, who was always a controversial choice. In 2014, Tortorella was fired by the Vancouver Canucks after one disastrous season, and he admitted he deserved to be. But Team USA’s general manager, Dean Lombardi, felt that Tortorella had learned some valuable lessons, so he gave him the job.

“John’s had a lot of success, but what I was most intrigued by was that he was willing to admit he’d made mistakes,” said Lombardi. “He freely opened up as far as mistakes he’d made with players, maybe even times with his system, as well as the media. That takes a lot.”

Upon getting hired, Tortorella talked about his plan for Team USA at the World Cup.

“It’s about pressure,” he said. “It’s about attacking. And let’s forget about the X’s and O’s, it’s about a mindset. It’s about a team that needs to feel good about itself before this tournament even starts, needs to feel strong mentally about itself. I think intangibles in such a short tournament is huge.”

The roster would reflect Tortorella’s philosophy. Players that liked to engage physically, like Justin Abdelkader, were chosen over skilled goal-scorers like Phil Kessel. On the back end, it was big Erik Johnson over a puck-mover like, say, Kevin Shattenkirk.

“We are going to know who we are,” Tortorella vowed. “And we are going to play our game.”

And after falling to Canada, he doubled down on the plan.

According to Tortorella, the problem for the Americans wasn’t the roster or tactics. It was a simple matter of execution.

“We didn’t play well enough,” he said. “But you guys can beat up the roster all you want. You look at some of those players on our roster, there are some pretty good skill players, and we just simply did not do enough offensively. And we self-inflicted quite a bit in the two games. We gave some easy goals, and you just can’t do that in a short tournament.”

He added, “I thought the guys were prepared, but we blow up, self-inflicted, and they surged, and we had no answer. We kept trying to catch up the rest of the game and just couldn’t get it done. ”

Meanwhile, Kessel took to Twitter:

Bottom line: this World Cup is going to sting for USA Hockey, and it’s likely to lead to some soul-searching. What kind of hockey do the Americans want to play? What do they value most? They tried it the hard-working, gritty way and it didn’t go very well. Is there a better way?

And hey, maybe there isn’t. Maybe right now there just isn’t enough talent to match up with Canada. Maybe there will be one day. But until that day arrives, maybe the Torts way is, in fact, the best way.

Let the debate rage.

Related: That was the worst possible World Cup debut for Team USA