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After playing a ‘key role’ in AHL, Sharks re-sign Goodrow to two-year deal

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Barclay Goodrow is officially back with the San Jose Sharks organization for the upcoming season.

The Sharks announced Monday that they have re-signed the 24-year-old left-shooting right winger to a two-year contract.

Goodrow, who was a restricted free agent having completed his entry-level contract, has appeared in 77 NHL games for San Jose over the last three years, splitting time between the big club and its AHL affiliate.

Last season with the San Jose Barracuda, Goodrow scored 25 goals and 45 points — both career highs for him in the minors — in 61 games.

“Barclay played a key role in the success of the Barracuda last season and we feel he took a step forward in his development,” said Sharks assistant general manager and Barracuda GM Joe Will in a statement.

“He took on more of a leadership role with the Barracuda and we look forward to him competing for a spot in the NHL this season.”

Habs have available cap space to help remedy pressing roster needs

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This post is part of Canadiens Day on PHT…

It’s been a particularly interesting time for Marc Bergevin as general manager of the Montreal Canadiens.

It really snowballed in June of 2016 with the P.K. Subban trade and the fallout from that, and has continued this offseason with a trade for Jonathan Drouin to help bring additional scoring to Montreal, the loss of Alex Radulov and Andrei Markov, and signing goalie Carey Price to an eight-year, $84 million contract extension that kicks in for the 2018-19 season.

Losing Radulov takes an offensively gifted player out of the lineup, while the club paid a massive amount of money to keep Price in Montreal through 2026.

There were many question marks for Bergevin and the Habs this summer. As discussed earlier today at PHT, one of the biggest dilemmas they may face is up the middle and much of that may depend on the continued development and usage of Alex Galchenyuk.

Yet, Bergevin may still be able to address that before the start of the regular season.

Montreal has about $8.46 million available in cap space, not to mention an additional second-round pick previously belonging to the Chicago Blackhawks, according to CapFriendly.

On the prospect of Bergevin perhaps making another move, Elliotte Friedman recently had some interesting comments to the NHL Network, according to FanRagSports:

“I think you guys a few minutes ago played the key clip, and that is that (Markov) was asked to wait until September or October,” said Friedman. “I get the impression that you’ve got Marc Bergevin sitting here with a lot of cap space and I think he’s sitting on something, or some ideas. And I’m not necessarily saying that he’s going to do something big, but I think he’s dreaming big.

“You talked about the trade earlier this year – the Sergachev-for-Drouin deal – I don’t think that trade happens if they aren’t trying to do something after what was a nightmare year for them last year to change the impression of the organization in the province.”

The Habs will enter next season after a first-round playoff exit to the New York Rangers. Of the 16 teams that qualified for the postseason, Montreal had the third worst scoring average, at 1.83 goals-for per game.

This season is likely to come with added pressure for both the Canadiens and Bergevin.

Price, who turns 30 years old next Wednesday, is in the final year of his current contract that has a still reasonable $6.5 million cap hit. When his new deal kicks in, his cap hit will rise to $10.5 million, which means him and Shea Weber will account for $18.35 million against the cap. That amounts to 24 per cent of the current $75 million ceiling in place for the 2017-18 campaign.

“There’s a saying we use: Goalies are not important until you don’t have one,” Bergevin told the Montreal Gazette last month.

“I’ve seen what’s going on around the league with teams who are looking for goaltenders and it’s really hard to do. So it’s a position that’s hard to find and we have in my opinion, in our opinion, one of the best in the business if not the best, so we’re going to keep him and make sure he’s here for the rest of his career.”

That took care of one long-term need.

The Habs still have others heading into the upcoming season, like possibly having to find a No. 1 center, or finding another talented player to improve this team offensively. The available cap space adds another level of intrigue.

Poll: Are the Senators capable of another deep playoff run?

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This post is part of Senators Day on PHT…

The Ottawa Senators came within one win, one goal of making it all the way to the Stanley Cup Final.

They beat the Boston Bruins in the opening round and then defeated Henrik Lundqvist and the New York Rangers in the second round. Their advancement into the Eastern Conference Final may have been a surprise of the playoffs, but apparently not to owner Eugene Melnyk, who expressed in the middle of February his optimism that the Senators could go on a prolonged postseason run.

Still, it’s likely not many others saw this team pushing the Pittsburgh Penguins to double overtime of Game 7 with a berth in the Stanley Cup Final on the line.

From the Toronto Star:

The Senators scored the fewest goals of the 16 playoff teams and were the only one to own a negative goal differential (minus-4). Opponents fired 211 more shots on goal than Ottawa did at five-on-five and special teams were also below-grade with the Sens tied for the seventh-worst power play and ninth-worst penalty kill.

The Senators received a tremendous playoff performance from captain Erik Karlsson, despite the fact he was dealing with a foot injury that would later require surgery. Craig Anderson posted a .922 save percentage in 19 playoff games, and there were surprise heroes along the way like Jean-Gabriel Pageau, who had a four-goal game against the Rangers in Round Two.

That run, however, is long over now and attention turns to the upcoming campaign. Getting into the playoffs will depend on many factors, including those beyond their control, like the improvement of teams like Boston, Florida, Tampa Bay and Toronto in the Atlantic Division, and other teams in the Metropolitan Division if the Senators are involved in a Wild Card race.

“This team now is ready to win,” recently added forward Nate Thompson said last month. “I don’t think this was a Cinderella team, it was the real deal. They have a pretty good window to win games and hopefully do something even more special.”

Now, have your say:

Senators are getting a bargain now, but keep an eye on that Erik Karlsson contract situation

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This post is part of Senators Day on PHT…

Erik Karlsson wasn’t playing at nearly 100 per cent during the Stanley Cup playoffs — and he was still by far Ottawa’s best player in their run to Game 7 of the Eastern Conference Final.

Not only was he Ottawa’s best player, he was often the best player on the ice between the Senators and their opponents, despite playing through a foot injury. That landed him a vote for the Conn Smythe, despite the fact his club came oh-so-close but ultimately didn’t make it to the Stanley Cup Final.

While brilliant in the playoffs, he paid quite a price.

The surgery on his injured left foot took place in the middle of June and requires a four-month recovery. The Senators remain hopeful that their best player will be ready for the beginning of the regular season in October.

While Karlsson gets plenty of accolades for the skill he possesses and his ability to log big minutes during regular season and playoffs — making it look easy at times, too — he may not get enough credit for just how durable he’s been over the last four years.

He had a string of three consecutive seasons in which he played the full 82-game schedule. That streak was interrupted in March at 324 consecutive games played due to his injury suffered right before the playoffs.

As Mark Stone aptly put it at the time: “He’s the best defenceman in the world. If you take him out of your lineup, it’s obviously a huge blow.”

The Senators have a number of key contributors like Craig Anderson in goal and Kyle Turris and Mike Hoffman — among others — up front. But the success of this team hinges greatly on Karlsson being in the lineup and healthy enough to play. Even on one healthy foot, he showed he was still capable of carrying Ottawa, but the Senators will gladly take him at 100 per cent health in two months time.

Off the ice, it’s worth mentioning that Karlsson has only two years remaining on his contract before he’s eligible for unrestricted free agency. At a $6.5 million cap hit, you could argue that for what Karlsson provides them every game — not just the points (71 in 77 games this past season) but being able to play almost 27 minutes per game on average — Ottawa is getting a bargain on that seven-year contract right now.

Karlsson is a premier defenseman at the age of 27, and yet his $7 million salary for next season is at the same level as Jeff Petry, Alex Pietrangelo and Johnny Boychuk, per CapFriendly. For Karlsson, that number does bump up to $7.5 million in the final year of his contract.

That is, of course, going to change with his next deal.

The Senators have benefited greatly from having one of the game’s best players on their blue line. He showed that once again in the 2017 Stanley Cup playoffs. He’s won the Norris Trophy twice and has four nominations in total.

And it won’t be long before the Senators will have to pay accordingly in order to keep Karlsson in Ottawa.

Looking to make the leap: Thomas Chabot

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This post is part of Senators Day on PHT…

Thomas Chabot spent a brief time in the NHL last season, before he was reassigned to junior in November.

His debut included just over seven minutes of ice time against the Arizona Coyotes on Oct. 18, and he was on the ice for two goals against. After his brief time in Ottawa, the 2015 first-round pick had another strong year in junior with the Saint John Sea Dogs, with 45 points in 34 games during the regular season and 23 points in 18 playoff games.

He was most impressive, however, for Team Canada at the World Juniors. His puck-moving abilities were instrumental in helping lead Canada’s offensive attack and he finished the tournament with four goals and 10 points in seven games.

It was just another part of a productive year from the left-shooting blue liner, who turned 20 years old in January.

Now, the Senators will look for Chabot to take another step in his development. He’s eligible for both the NHL and AHL this season.

Not including Chabot, Ottawa currently has seven defensemen signed for next season, with $19.85 million committed to that position, per CapFriendly. The club wanted to expose Dion Phaneuf in the expansion draft but he ultimately didn’t waive his no-movement clause. Instead, the Senators were left to expose Marc Methot, who was not only selected by Vegas but then traded to Dallas.

During the period of time in which Senators general manager Pierre Dorion was contemplating asking Phaneuf to waive his no-movement clause, he spoke highly of Chabot, saying he could challenge for a roster spot when training camp opens.

He previously stated that Chabot was, “…arguably the best defenceman outside the NHL right now,” according to TSN in April, when the injury-plagued Senators were looking into calling up Chabot.

An offseason signing that may impact Chabot’s situation is the addition of veteran defenseman Johnny Oduya at one year for $1 million.

“We know, through the course of last year, that defencemen are always at a premium,” Dorion told the Ottawa Citizen recently.

“Does this mean (Chabot) starts in Belleville? We don’t know. There’s a chance we could start with eight defencemen or seven defencemen.”