Ryan Johansen

Getty

Reports: Matt Duchene still wants trade from Avalanche

12 Comments

Winning might fix a lot of things, but can it repair a bridge that has been burned?

In the case of Matt Duchene and the Colorado Avalanche, the answer may very well be “No.”

On Monday, Sportsnet’s Chris Johnston declared as much during an intermission interview with Jeff Marek (no video or audio available at this time). Elliotte Friedman backed up such sentiments in his latest “31 Thoughts” piece for Sportsnet, deeming it “unlikely” that winning would patch things up.

The most promising element might be that the Avs seem to be a little more open-minded when it comes to the sort of return they’re expecting for the speedy forward:

I do think they are doing work on non-NHL prospects of potential trade partners — especially left-handed defenders. That might be a way to break the trade stalemate, providing Colorado’s scouts like what they see.

Getting NHL teams to shake loose quality defensemen who are already on their rosters is easier said than done, but it’s easier to sell management and fans on guys who haven’t made an impact yet.

(Although that’s not always true, of course, as sometimes people tend to inflate a prospect’s chances when their work lives largely in their imaginations.)

Really, whatever it takes to get Duchene out of his misery, what with sad-looking photo shoots and comments from Peter Forsberg/other childhood heroes.

Other NHL teams – not to mention Avs GM/other Duchene hero Joe Sakic himself – should take this as another reminder to be careful how they handle players, even if they’re shopping them. Whether it comes down to official statements or allowing things to “leak,” you can really damage a relationship if you lack a certain level of finesse.

History repeating?

Allow a digression: it’s difficult not to think of how the Avalanche had a falling out with Ryan O'Reilly when considering the Duchene situation. There’s the possibility that it provides a window into Duchene’s thinking.

Back in 2015, PHT looked at resurfacing reports about tension between the two forwards toward the end of ROR’s time with Colorado. Duchene explained that O’Reilly was a great teammate “at the rink” and seemed irritated that the two-way forward was trying to break through what seemed like a $6M ceiling in Colorado.

So, in Duchene’s mind, he might have taken less money than he could have in accepting $6M per year.

Imagine, then, the frustration he felt in being a team player and then seeing his team dragging his name through the mud. Even if his take wasn’t that dramatic, the treatment came across as harsh.

Would a few early wins really smooth all of that over?

Either way, even that narrative is fading out, as the Avalanche are on a two-game losing streak to fall to a more modest 4-3-0 so far in 2017-18. That’s still a quantum leap from the historic lows they hit last season, but Duchene can be excused if he doesn’t believe that putting the team before his feelings will open the door for some deep run.

***

Look, it’s understandable that the Avalanche want to get a great return for Duchene. Sports are littered with quarter-on-the-dollar trade where contenders give up junk for struggling teams’ best players.

On the other hand, every now and then, the planets align for fair NHL trades. Ryan Johansen goes for Seth Jones. Brandon Saad and Artemi Panarin meet specific needs for their respective new (old-new) squads. Even Dany Heatley for Marian Hossa was pretty reasonable, considering the circumstances the then-Atlanta Thrashers were facing.

Still, trades are fun, and it’s tough not to feel a little jealous of the NBA’s frenzy, where super teams aligned and realigned seemingly on a weekly basis.

It would just be straight-up fun to see Duchene try to take the Columbus Blue Jackets to another level or make the Nashville Predators seem downright scary. One might even change Duchene’s soundtrack from Simon & Garfunkel to the theme for Dawson’s Creek in rapt anticipation.

James O’Brien is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @cyclelikesedins.

MORE FROM NHL ON NBC SPORTS:

Stanley Cup repeat, not revenge: Predators can’t solve Murray, Penguins

Getty
7 Comments

Pittsburgh Penguins fans were riffing on the “We want the Cup” chant on Saturday, teasing the Nashville Predators with “We got the Cup.”

Perhaps “Can’t beat Matt” or “Murray’s in your head” would cut even deeper?

Carrying over dominance from the 2017 Stanley Cup Final, Matt Murray blanked the Predators as the Penguins won 4-0 in that championship rematch on Saturday. Murray shut out the Predators in Game 5 and 6 of the Stanley Cup Final, too, so this marks three goose eggs in a row for Nashville vs. the quick-learning Pens netminder.

The Penguins have outscored the Predators 12-0 in these past three games. Woof.

Here’s an exact update on that shutout streak:

For better or worse, the Predators get a chance to score a goal against the Penguins – and possibly Murray, depending – when they meet again in Nashville on Nov. 11.

To little surprise, the Predators showed frustration as the game boiled down, prompting Ryan Reaves – who actually scored against Nashville – to drop the gloves more than once. (More on Reaves Sunday.)

(While Reaves drew praise from Mike Sullivan on Saturday night, people note that Sidney Crosby and Evgeni Malkin still received the sort of hard hits many would expect. Anyway, more on Reaves tomorrow.)

Ryan Johansen seems pretty chill about this loss, even as Nashville hasn’t generated a standings point in its first two games of 2017-18. Maybe it’s because he was sidelined during Murray’s first two shutouts against the Preds?

Well, what can you really say, right?

The not-so-good familiar part for the Penguins

As much as this was a great night for the Penguins, the “Groundhog Day” feel of history repeating itself had its negative aspects.

To be specific, the Penguins continue to deal with bad injury luck for their defensemen. It’s easy to think back as Kris Letang as the only loss during that last run, but others either missed time or were limited by ailments. Ian Cole was the latest to suffer a rough break, losing teeth thanks to a gruesome puck to the face:

The Penguins said he’s out indefinitely.

PHT’s Central Division preview: Blackhawks, Wild, Predators, and more

Getty
4 Comments

For ages, it felt like the Central Division was the reigning champion as the toughest division in the NHL.

The Metropolitan Division seemed to knock the Central off its perch, right down to the Pittsburgh Penguins beating the Nashville Predators in the 2017 Stanley Cup Final. Still, much of those stumbles seemed self-imposed, as the Dallas Stars struggled, the Winnipeg Jets disappointed, and the Colorado Avalanche were jaw-droppingly bad.

Let’s take a look at PHT’s material on the Central Division with the 2017-18 season set to begin.

Click here for the Atlantic Division preview.

Click here for PHT’s staff predictions.

Chicago Blackhawks

Poll/looking to make the leap

Colorado Avalanche

Poll/looking to make the leap

Dallas Stars

Poll/looking to make the leap

Minnesota Wild

Poll/looking to make the leap

Speaking of signings, the Wild inked a deal with Daniel Winnik today:

Nashville Predators

Poll/Looking to make the leap

St. Louis Blues

Poll/looking to make the leap

One other Blues note:

Winnipeg Jets

Poll/looking to make the leap

Predators tab Roman Josi as new captain, call him ‘our Roger Federer’

Getty
9 Comments

The Nashville Predators boasted some appealing options to take the torch from Mike Fisher as captain, but really there was only one obvious name: Roman Josi.

Josi officially became the team’s eighth captain on Tuesday. Ryan Ellis appears to be second-in-command as “associate” captain, while they seem interested in spreading the leadership wealth around otherwise:

As captain, Josi will see an increased role on the Predators leadership team, which will also see some new appointments. Defenseman Ryan Ellis has been named as the team’s associate captain, while Ryan Johansen, Filip Forsberg and Mattias Ekholm will all serve as alternate captains. In addition, Pekka Rinne, P.K. Subban and Nick Bonino have all taken positions within the leadership group.

If that’s not a sign that the team is taking this seriously – kind of amusingly so – consider that Ellis and Josi “interviewed” for the position and Peter Laviolette evoked military structures in discussing the decision, as sports teams love to do.

Josi seemed flattered when GM David Poile described him as “our Roger Federer,” a fellow Swiss sports star.

At face value, that’s great, especially since it breaks through the near-corporate-speak that saddles announcements like these.

That said, it’s funny to compare the leader in a team sport to a tennis player, among the most individualistic athletes in all of sport. There aren’t many moments of teamwork beyond doubles and rare events like the Davis Cup.

Overall, it’s another strong decision by the Predators. It’s merely fun to tease them a bit about the cornier aspects.

Predators eager to return after team’s shortest offseason

Getty

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) The Nashville Predators couldn’t be happier to return to work after their painful loss in the Stanley Cup Final , a deep playoff run that made for the shortest offseason in franchise history.

“I feel like it’s been enough time,” goaltender Pekka Rinne said Thursday. “I had a good few months in Finland, close to my family, my friends. Enough time to get ready, enough time to work, train and be off the ice and get your body recovered and also ready. So I think it was enough time.”

Many of the Predators have been skating together for the past three weeks, and 20 of them helped the NFL’s Tennessee Titans kick off their season last weekend as the honorary 12th Titan.

They reported Thursday to Bridgestone Arena for the start of training camp, and they spoke in a hallway outside the visitors’ locker room with renovations to their own dressing room not finished yet for the Western Conference champs. They hit the ice Friday for testing followed by the first practice Saturday.

Center Ryan Johansen said it feels awesome to get back to work and see teammates again with the offseason over after a painful loss to Pittsburgh in six games in June .

“Everyone’s always looking forward to a fresh start, new season,” Johansen said. “Looking forward to get things going.”

FULLY RECOVERED: Johansen, knocked out of the Western Conference finals with acute compartment syndrome in his left thigh, said he’s completely healthy. Same with forward Kevin Fiala, who broke his left femur in Game 1 of the Western Conference semifinals against St. Louis. Johansen signed an eight-year, $64 million deal in late July, perhaps the biggest sign of confidence from the Predators that their first-line center recovered nicely.

But center Nick Bonino, a free agent addition from the Pittsburgh Penguins, is recovering from surgery in July to add a couple screws in the foot he broke during the Stanley Cup Final. He said he remains on track for his goal of playing in the season opener Oct. 5 in Boston.

CAPTAIN, WHO’S CAPTAIN: Mike Fisher announced his retirement in August after 17 NHL seasons , leaving the Predators looking for his replacement. Not that Nashville is in a big hurry to name the eighth captain in franchise history. Defensemen Roman Josi and Ryan Ellis are among the options, and it was Josi who had the honors among the Predators of plunging a sword into the field before the Titans’ season opener last weekend. Johansen said the Predators all know who their leaders are. “That’s just something coaches will announce I’m sure when they’re ready,” Johansen said.

WAITING ON ELLIS: The Predators announced last week that Ellis, who was at his best in the playoffs with 13 points, will be out until late December or maybe even January as he recovers from offseason knee surgery. The 5-foot-10, 180-pound Ellis played with Josi down the stretch before being hurt during the Stanley Cup Final.

Nashville traded for Alexei Emelin, a move general manager David Poile said was made knowing they would need help while Ellis recovered. Now Predators coach Peter Laviolette has to decide whether to play Emelin with Josi or break up the pairing of All-Star P.K. Subban and Mattias Ekholm. Subban played with Emelin in Montreal and said obviously he developed great chemistry with Ekholm. “It’s going to come down to what’s best for the team, and if it’s best for us to play together still,” Subban said. “If not, we’re going to have to be positive about the situation we’re in.”

NOT SO NEW FACE: A year ago, the Predators had to work Subban into their mix. Now there’s Bonino, Emelin and Scott Hartnell. The 35-year-old-veteran isn’t a stranger to Nashville, drafted by the Predators sixth overall in 2000. He signed a one-year contract for $1 million in July.