Rob O'Gara


WATCH LIVE: Penguins at Rangers – Wednesday Night Rivalry




Pittsburgh Penguins

Jake Guentzel/Sidney Crosby/Conor Sheary

Carl Hagelin/Evgeni Malkin/Patric Hornqvist

Bryan Rust/Derick Brassard/Phil Kessel

Tom Kuhnhackl/Riley Sheahan/Carter Rowney

Brian Dumoulin/Kris Letang

Jamie Oleksiak/Justin Schultz

Olli Maatta/Chad Ruhwedel

Starting goalie: Casey DeSmith

[PHT’s preview for Penguins – Rangers.]

New York Rangers

Chris Kreider/Mika Zibanejad/Jesper Fast

Ryan Spooner/Kevin Hayes/Mats Zuccarello

Jimmy Vesey/Vladislav Namestnikov/Pavel Buchnevich

Cody McLeod/David Desharnais/Paul Carey

Marc Staal/Neal Pionk

Brady Skjei/Ryan Sproul

John Gilmour/Rob O'Gara

Starting goalie: Alexandar Georgiev

Spooner presents Rangers with another tough future decision


Ryan Spooner is really cuddling up to this opportunity to make waves with the New York Rangers.

After collecting two assists in his Rangers debut (being involved in both goals in a 3-2 overtime loss to Detroit), Spooner topped himself last night, generating three more assists as the Rangers managed a 6-5 overtime win against the Vancouver Canucks.

Vladislav Namestnikov made a great first impression with the Rangers, scoring a goal and an assist during last night’s debut.

It almost makes you wonder if the Rangers might embrace this new, post-trade deadline reality and just be … messy fun?

Naturally, it’s not reasonable to expect Spooner, 26, to generate 2.5 assists per game during his stay with the Rangers – however long that is.

Still, plenty of people must feel vindicated that they pointed out that, despite some bumpy times with the Boston Bruins, he’s quietly carved out some nice numbers. In 39 games this season, Spooner managed a solid 25 points for the B’s. Rick Nash, meanwhile, generated 28 points (though with 18 goals) in his final 60 games with the Rangers.

Spooner’s showing remarkable chemistry so far with Jesper Fast and Kevin Hayes, which might provide some precious relief for Rangers fans. Actually, for a team that unloaded some significant names, the Rangers’ top nine still looks dangerous enough to make them a “spoiler” headache down the stretch:

Chris KreiderMika ZibanejadPavel Buchnevich

Spooner — Hayes — Fast

Jimmy Vesey — Namestnikov — Mats Zuccarello

Not half-bad, right? Of course, the defense is the real problem here, but the Rangers might actually be entertaining, combining some solid offense with Henrik Lundqvist stubbornly trying to make 50 saves per night.

The other interesting facet of the NHL-ready players the Rangers received in their slew of trades is that they, too, received rentals in Spooner and Namestnikov. Mike Murphy of Blueshirt Banter ponders Spooner’s future with the team, wondering if he might get lost in the free-agent shuffle and noting that Namestnikov is likely a higher priority to re-sign:

Spooner is coming off of a one-year, $2,825,000 contract. If the Rangers want him around for more than next season his AAV is going to approach $4 million a year, depending on the term. There’s a good chance that a contract like that won’t fit into Gorton’s vision of what this team needs to be. If that’s the case, moving him on draft day would be the best way forward.

Glancing at the Rangers’ Cap Friendly page, the Rangers will need to decide what to do with a wide array of restricted free agents: Spooner, Namestnikov, Kevin Hayes, Jimmy Vesey, Brady Skjei, John Gilmour, and Rob O'Gara.

With a pile of picks and some new players to ponder, the Rangers gave themselves a ton of flexibility this summer. The challenge, then, is to make the most of these opportunities and avoid boxing themselves in with mistakes.

Figuring out what to do with Spooner may very well be filed with making the most of those later first-rounders under “easier said than done.”


What’s next for Rangers rebuild?

Some Rangers feel like the organization threw in the towel.

James O’Brien is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at or follow him on Twitter @cyclelikesedins.

Where does Rangers’ rebuild go from here?


Just a few weeks before the NHL trade deadline the New York Rangers told their fans that changes were coming.

Even though the team was still very much in the playoff race, it was becoming clear that it was not a Stanley Cup contender and with several veteran players nearing the end of their contracts it was probably a good opportunity to start selling off those players and trying to restock the cupboards.

Honestly, though, that restocking probably began long before that letter was sent out when the team traded Derek Stepan, a top-six center, and Antti Raanta, a very solid goalie, to the Arizona Coyotes for the No. 7 overall pick in the draft and defenseman Anthony DeAngelo.

It continued over the past few days with the trading of Michael Grabner to New Jersey, Rick Nash and Nick Holden to Boston, and J.T. Miller and Ryan McDonagh to Tampa Bay.

It was a ton of movement.

In return for those seven players (including Stepan and Raanta) the Rangers have picked up 16 assets in return.

Here is the complete list:

  • 2017 first-round pick (from Arizona — used to select Lias Andersson)
  • 2018 first-round pick (Boston)
  • 2018 first-round pick (Tampa Bay)
  • 2018 second-round pick (New Jersey)
  • 2018 third-round pick (Boston)
  • 2019 conditional second-round pick (Tampa Bay — would become another first-round pick if Tampa Bay wins the Stanley Cup this season or next season)
  • 2019 seventh-round pick
  • Vladislav Namestnikov
  • Ryan Spooner
  • Matt Beleskey
  • Anthony DeAngelo
  • Ryan Lindgren
  • Libor Hajek
  • Brett Howden
  • Ygor Rykov
  • Rob O'Gara

That is a lot of future assets and a lot of players coming back in return. That bounty gives the Rangers seven picks in the first three rounds of the 2018 draft, including three in the first round.

So what do we make of this return and where the Rangers ultimately go from here?

First, there is a lot of quantity over quality here.

Other than the pick they received for Stepan and Raanta none of the draft picks are going to be prime picks. All of those teams are headed to the playoffs and when it comes to the Boston and Tampa Bay firsts those could be in the mid-20s and perhaps even later. The other picks (second, third, seventh) are basically lottery tickets. When you’re dealing with draft picks outside of the top-10 one of the best ways to find talent is to have as many picks as possible to increase your odds. Not all of those draft picks are going to land the Rangers a future NHL player. But they have at least increased their odds of finding one by giving themselves more chances.

The same is true for a lot of the prospects. Some good ones, but no real blue-chippers. They did not get back a Mikhail Sergachev or Brayden Point from Tampa Bay in the McDonagh and Miller deal.

They did not get back any organization’s top prospect, but there are still a couple of interesting players in those deals.

So, about this retooling/rebuilding. Is this it? Or do they do more in the offseason and unload players like Mats Zuccarello, Chris Kreider or Mika Zibanejad and really go all in on an all-out, full-blown rebuild?

That might be a tough sell with Henrik Lundqvist still hanging around — and not really seeming to have much interest in playing elsewhere — and still playing at a pretty high level. As long as he is on the roster there is going to be an incentive to want to win, and he is probably going to give them a chance simply because he might keep them in some games they may not otherwise be in.

Or, with that latter point in mind, is this more of a retooling that allows the Rangers to stockpile a lot of future assets while still trying to compete? That can be a dangerous game because you don’t want to get stuck in the NHL’s middle ground where you are not quite a contender, but you are also not quite bad enough to increase your chances of a top pick and a true franchise-changing talent in the lottery.

Plus, it’s not like they traded a bunch of players that have long-term contracts. Dealing Nash, Grabner and Holden made sense because all three were unrestricted free agents after this season. Raanta was never going to be more than a backup in New York. Miller was a restricted free agent after this season and in line for a raise, while McDonagh would have been an unrestricted free agent after next season.

The only player throughout this entire roster purge that still had several years of term left on his contract was Stepan.

Even after all of that they still have some good players on the roster, especially at forward where they could still potentially put a formidable group on the ice next season, especially with a healthy Kreider and what would hopefully be a further developed Pavel Buchnevich.

What’s interesting about the forwards is two of the bigger pieces they received in the Nash and McDonagh/Miller trades — Namestnikov and Spooner — are established NHLers, and pretty good ones.

Namestnikov may never duplicate the production he has put on the board this season while playing alongside Nikita Kucherov and Steven Stamkos for an extended period of time, but he has talent and has shown flashes of being a top-six player. Spooner has shown he can be a 40-50 point forward in the NHL the past couple of years. Both are RFA’s after this season and in line for raises, and even though they still have to fill out a roster next season those do not really seem like the type of forwards a team that is going to tear it all down would look to acquire.

They clearly reset things, but they haven’t totally torn it to the ground. A lot of the players traded were probably going to be gone in a few months anyway for no return if they had just simply held on to them. They still have some useful pieces in place and by shedding the salaries of Stepan and McDonagh they have a little more salary cap flexibility.

There are certainly some different directions the Rangers could go from here, and it’s not really clear which way they will take it.

They have a lot of lottery tickets and assets in their hands for the future. But they still have some interesting pieces for the present.


Adam Gretz is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at or follow him on Twitter @AGretz.

Trade: Rangers trade Nick Holden to Bruins


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The New York Rangers and Boston Bruins have been rumored to be possible trade partners for a defenseman, and on Tuesday afternoon it happened.

It just wasn’t the defenseman — Ryan McDonagh — that people were talking about.

Instead it is Nick Holden heading to Boston.

The Trade: The New York Rangers send Nick Holden to the Boston Bruins for defenseman Rob O'Gara and a 2018 third-round draft pick.

Why the Rangers make this trade: They told their fans changes were coming. The team is falling out of the playoff race, it needs to hit the reset button, and Holden is an unrestricted free agent after this season that probably did not fit in with the new direction of the team.

At 24 and with only 11 games of NHL experience under his belt O’Gara probably isn’t much in the way of a prospect, while the third-round pick is probably the key to the deal for the Rangers.

Why the Bruins make this trade: They get a veteran defenseman to add some depth to their blue line for a potential Stanley Cup run. It’s not the blockbuster move that acquiring a player like McDonagh would have been, but given the low cost it could prove to be a pretty solid depth move.

Holden, 30, has been with the Rangers since the start of the 2016-17 season and has 14 goals and 32 assists in 135 games with the team over the past two years. He had a really strong year offensively a season ago (setting career highs across the board) but has seen a bit of a regression this season. He won’t need to play the 20 minutes a night he was playing in New York and could fit in nicely as a depth defenseman in Boston.

Who won the trade: Both teams get what they’re looking for. The Bruins get a depth defender for a Stanley Cup and don’t have to pay a steep price, while the Rangers cash in an asset that probably wasn’t going to re-sign with them after the season.


Adam Gretz is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at or follow him on Twitter @AGretz.