Patrick Kane


The Buzzer: Isles end eight-game losing skid; Bruins win streak stops at six

Players of the Night: 

Jonathan Toews, Chicago Blackhawks: Toews assisted on all three of Chicago’s goals. Two of his helpers were came on the power play and of the primary variety. Captain serious has picked up nine points in his last six contests.

Patrick Kane, Chicago Blackhawks: He scored the game-winning goal Sunday’s 3-1 win over the Bruins. He also assisted teammate Brent Seabrook‘s late tally. The 29-year-old has 25 goals and 66 points in 70 games this season. The ‘Hawks put an end to Boston’s six-game winning streak.

Johnny Boychuk, New York Islanders: The Isles blue liner finished Sunday’s game against the Flames with a great stat line. He had one goal, two assists and a plus-5 rating in 21:05 of ice time. They also managed to put an end to their eight-game losing streak.

Christopher Gibson, New York Islanders: Another day, another 50-shot performance against the Islanders. Gibson turned aside 50 of the 52 shots the Flames sent his way.

Darcy Kuemper, Arizona Coyotes: It wasn’t exactly must-see TV, but the Coyotes netminder managed to stop all 26 shots he faced in a win over the Canucks. This was his first shutout as a member of the ‘Yotes.

Highlights of the Night:

Alexander Radulov doing Alexander Radulov things:

Patrick Kane scored the go-ahead goal late:

Another mention for young Gibson:

Factoids of the Night: 

Another goal and an assist for Evgeni Malkin on Sunday. He’s rolling:

Christopher Gibson saw a lot of rubber tonight:

Patrick Kane is moving on up:

The Pens are rolling:


Blackhawks 3, Bruins 1

Islanders 5, Flames 2

Penguins 3, Stars 1

Coyotes 1, Canucks 0

Joey Alfieri is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at or follow him on Twitter @joeyalfieri.

Kane scores late winner as Blackhawks down Bruins 3-1


For the Chicago Blackhawks to avoid a three-game losing skid, they’d have to beat a team that had just won six straight at home.

Luckily for the Blackhawks, the schedule lured the Boston Bruins away from the comfortable confines of TD Garden on Sunday and killed two birds with one stone, simultaneously ending both streaks in a 3-1 triumph at United Center in the Windy City.

The Blackhawks regrouped quickly, going 50-plus minutes without allowing a goal on Sunday, a day after allowing seven goals to the same Bruins team, including four unanswered en route to a 7-4 loss.

Chicago led from the 7:26 mark of the first period as Artem Anisimov deflected a point shot past Bruins netminder Anton Khudobin for a 1-0 lead.

Perhaps a little fatigue caught up with the Bruins and maybe the well ran a little dry.

Boston has had to make due without Patrice Bergeron and Charlie McAvoy, both nursing injuries, and David Backes, who is out due to suspension.

On Sunday, Brad Marchand‘s name was added to the list the walking wounded, after he was made a late scratch with an upper-body injury prior to the game.

It was a tad suspect after Marchand clotheslined Anthony Duclair on Saturday if the first game of the home-and-home, leading to an injury for the latter that’s ruled him out for 1-2 weeks. Perhaps the Bruins didn’t want to risk any retribution.

But even a Bruins team hampered by injury is still a good Bruins team as witnessed in Saturday’s win.

Despite all the scoring missing from the lineup, an old friend stepped up just after the mid-way mark of the third period.

Zdeno Chara let a wrist shot go that finally solved Anton Forsberg, who stopped 31-of-32 in the game.

Chara’s impact was felt again minutes later after an ill-advised high-sticking penalty gave the Blackhawks a four-minute power play.

Patrick Kane wasted no time snatching back the lead, firing a snapshot bar down past Khudobin for the go-ahead marker that would eventually be the game-winner.

Brent Seabrook would add the insurance marker with 1:05 left, putting the third goal past Khudobin, who negotiation 36-of-39 shots sent his way.

The Bruins trailed the Tampa Bay Lightning by six points heading into Sunday’s game, but owned three games in-hand. So chalk this one up as a missed opportunity to gain some ground against a team that won’t be playing in the playoffs this season.

Scott Billeck is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at or follow him on Twitter @scottbilleck

WATCH LIVE: Boston Bruins at Chicago Blackhawks

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NBC’s coverage of the 2017-18 season continues on Sunday as the Chicago Blackhawks host the Boston Bruins at 12:30 p.m. ET. You can watch the game online by clicking here.


Brad MarchandRiley NashDavid Pastrnak
Jake DeBruskDavid KrejciRick Nash
Danton HeinenTommy Wingels – Brian Gionta
Tim SchallerSean KuralyNoel Acciari

Zdeno CharaBrandon Carlo
Torey KrugNick Holden
Matt GrzelcykKevan Miller

Starting goalie: Anton Khudobin

WATCH LIVE – 12:30 p.m. ET

Brandon SaadJonathan ToewsPatrick Kane
Alex DeBrincatNick Schmaltz – John Hayden
Tomas JurcoArtem Anisimov – Matt Highmore
Patrick SharpDavid Kampf – TBD

Duncan KeithConnor Murphy
Erik GustafssonBrent Seabrook
Jordan OesterleJan Rutta

Starting goalie: Anton Forsberg

Taylor Hall’s remarkable point streak ends at 26 games

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As the old saying goes, Hall good things must come to an end.

(I’ll see myself out).

Taylor Hall‘s very long point streak was stopped at 26 games in the New Jersey Devils 3-2 loss against the Winnipeg Jets on Thursday.

Hall had 18 goals and 38 points during the run, which began on Jan. 2. There wasn’t a game he played in so far in 2018 that he didn’t factor on the scoresheet.

Hall missed three games late in that month with a hand injury, but it despite the hiccup, the former Edmonton Oilers star never seemed to be deterred.

Hall recorded 11 multi-point games during the streak and put up some historic numbers along the way.

According to’s Rob Vollman, Hall’s streak was approaching the same stratosphere as Wayne Gretzky:

Gretzky had at least one point in the Edmonton Oilers’ first 51 games of the 1983-84 season. And though Hall’s personal streak is a little more than halfway to Gretzky’s streak, once scoring levels are factored in, it’s nearly as impressive.

Hall has been just as large a part of New Jersey’s offense during his streak as Gretzky was for Edmonton during his. Hall has either scored or assisted on 50.7 percent (38 of 75) of New Jersey’s goals during his streak, 0.5 percent less than Gretzky’s 51.2 percent (153 of 299).

Vollman gives a great historical look at Hall’s streak and is well worth the read.

Vollman also pointed out that Hall’s streak was the longest in the NHL since Patrick Kane achieved a streak spanning the same number of games during the 2015-16 season.

The carnage is over, for now. But the streak has put Hall’s name in the running for the Hart Trophy as the league’s most valuable player, and deservedly so.

Of course, we’d be remiss not to ponder what Peter Chiarelli is thinking right now.

There’s probably a feeling of relief. The constant reminder of Hall’s brilliance over the past two months must be excruciating.

And there’s probably still that excruciating pain given how dismal the Oilers have been this season.

Either way, Hall is well for Taylor Hall.

(OK, OK. I’m done.)

Scott Billeck is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at or follow him on Twitter @scottbilleck

Underdog U.S. players ‘trying to prove some doubters wrong’

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Be sure to visit and NBC Olympic Talk for full hockey coverage from PyeongChang.

GANGNEUNG, South Korea (AP) — The ”Miracle On Ice” was a Minnesota production.

If the U.S. pulls off another Olympic miracle, it would be a nationwide effort.

When the 1980 U.S. hockey team made up of college kids shocked the favored Soviet Union on the way to winning the gold medal, 13 players came from Minnesota, four from Massachusetts, two from Michigan and one from Wisconsin. The 2018 team couldn’t be constructed more differently with players from 12 different states and leagues all over the world, though it has the same underdog approach from careers of being discounted and passed over.

”We’re trying to prove some doubters wrong,” goaltender Ryan Zapolski said. ”We’ve all had pretty successful pro careers, I think, but we still have doubters, for sure. And I think that’s a motivation for us. We’ve been overlooked pretty much our whole careers, much of us, so just in the back of our minds we still think of those times where people didn’t give us the right chances and have this opportunity now to kind of take advantage of that.”

Again, a team of Russians is the favorite even if it’s under a neutral flag and again the U.S. is trying to end a lengthy gold-medal drought, which dates back to 1980. The Americans will try to do it with players from Massachusetts, New York, Michigan and Minnesota and some less-common hockey hotbeds: Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Colorado, California, Connecticut, Virginia, Florida and Arizona.

Three players come from Philadelphia suburbs alone.

”To have three kids from Philadelphia, you would never have seen on that 1980 team,” said Brian O’Neill, a native of Yardley, Pennsylvania. ”I think it just shows you how far hockey has come in the U.S. where you have a California representative, you have a Pennsylvania representative, Florida – you name it. I think that’s just a testament to how good hockey’s gotten in the U.S.”

The NHL’s expansion into the Sun Belt led forward Broc Little to start playing in Arizona, goalie Brandon Maxwell in Florida and defenseman Jonathon Blum in Southern California. As players seek to build chemistry quickly for a short tournament, they think the varying backgrounds can only help.

”There’s different culture, there’s different mindsets,” Blum said. ”(Players from) different states bring different things. Californians like to stay laid back and more easygoing, so I try to bring that to the room.”

In the room, only captain Brian Gionta, at 39, is old enough to have been alive for the 1980 Olympics and is proud of the diversity on the 25-man roster. Winning gold in Lake Placid certainly had an effect on spreading hockey. Tony Granato, now coach, had teammates from Texas and Oklahoma at the 1988 Olympics, and the progression has continued.

”The ’80 team was basically Massachusetts and Minnesota,” Granato said. ”It says that our game isn’t as regional as it used to be, so I think that’s a positive thing: players coming from all over the place.”

Many of these players started from the bottom, now they’re here. Zapolski, fellow goalie David Leggio and defensemen Matt Gilroy and Ryan Gunderson were all college walk-ons and now get to reprise that role by being thrust into the Olympic spotlight as NHL continues its season.

”All of these guys have had great paths to get to where they’re at,” Granato said. ”It’s different paths than Patrick Kane and those guys had from the last few Olympics, but they’re all great hockey players.”

Gunderson, one of the three Philadelphia-area products, said people back home often forget that no team in the tournament has an NHL player. But the Russians have stars Ilya Kovalchuk and Pavel Datsyuk, while the U.S. has 10 players – including all three goalies – who haven’t played in the NHL.

On paper, the U.S. doesn’t stack up well against Russia, which draws players from just three Kontinental Hockey League clubs. Zapolski said he and his teammates are well-aware of the predictions that don’t give them much of a chance.

”We’re as good as anybody, but we know we’re not a favorite out here so I think it’s a little extra chip on our shoulder, too, going into every game, especially against a team like Russia,” the Erie, Pennsylvania native said. ”We know we’re going to be big underdogs against them. I’m sure it’s extra motivation.”

The Americans are motivated by slights, but there’s a reason they won’t be putting on ”Underdog” masks like the Super Bowl-champion Philadelphia Eagles: They think they can do some damage.

”You look at the rosters of some of the teams, obviously they’ve got some great players,” Gionta said. ”But where this team is at and the hunger that this team shows, anything’s possible.”

Follow Hockey Writer Stephen Whyno on Twitter at

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