Mike Cammalleri

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It’s Los Angeles Kings day at PHT

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With two Stanley Cup rings in tow – the only Stanley Cup rings this franchise has ever won – it must have felt unfair to Dean Lombardi and especially Darryl Sutter when they were catapulted from their posts with the Los Angeles Kings.

To some extent, Lombardi’s ouster makes sense, as his loyalty/poor forecasting skills set the stage for some brutal contracts to Dustin Brown and Marian Gaborik and some shaky ones to Anze Kopitar and Jonathan Quick.

Honestly, it felt like Sutter squeezed as much as you could expect out of this roster.

Sutter took over for a Kings team that was in danger of missing the playoffs, only to win that treasured first Stanley Cup in 2011-12. He did it again in 2013-14, but beyond that, Sutter helped Los Angeles become a dominant possession team until the bitter end.

Then again, maybe that’s the point.

Perhaps the Kings got as much as they could out of the approaches that Lombardi and Sutter take. Thus, Los Angeles is taking a gamble that new GM Rob Blake can clean up the salary cap messes while John Stevens took enough notes as a long-time assistant to bridge the elements of Sutter’s style that work with some tweaks that bring this team to a more modern approach.

So far, the results have been positive, although they’ve been taking baby steps to push forward.

The Kings faced challenges in signing Tyler Toffoli and Tanner Pearson to affordable deals, and Blake managed to ace those difficult tests. Los Angeles made a nice, solid bargain move in bringing back Mike Cammalleri for just $1M, a signing that ended up becoming part of an off-season trend of veterans accepting cheap reunions. (Scott Hartnell going back to Nashville for that same price is just one other prominent instance.)

There’s also some excitement if they indeed got a steal in 11th pick Gabriel Vilardi, who slid in the 2017 NHL Draft because of skating concerns.

Now, not every change was positive. Losing quality defenseman Brayden McNabb to the expansion draft has to sting. Matt Greene also officially retired, so this blueline could be thinner in 2017-18.

Overall, things seem a little dour for the Kings, though it’s probably hasty to assume that this core’s window is totally closed. On the other hand, Blake must also think long and hard about closing the window himself by moving assets while they still have value to jump-start a rebuild.

The Kings are a fascinating and challenging team to observe, so today should be a fun one on PHT.

Kings seem to have no interest in adding Jagr

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The Los Angeles Kings are in need of offense, and Jaromir Jagr, the No. 2 scorer in NHL history, is still in need of a new team for the 2017-18 season. Despite that potential match the Kings have no interest in adding the 45-year-old future Hall of Famer to their roster for this upcoming season.

General manager Rob Blake said as much during a question and answer session with Kings fans this past week, via Lisa Dillman of NHL.com.

Here is Blake talking about the possibility of adding Jagr…

“Obviously [Jagr] is a tremendous player, been a tremendous player for a number of years, a [future] Hall of Famer,” Kings general manager Rob Blake said during a Q&A session with season ticket holders on Thursday. “When you get to a certain age, you have to be a certain fit on a team.

“We’ve looked at lot of different free agents in the summer and where it fits in in our projections. … There was also the equation of the salary cap and how things fit in. We didn’t go in the direction of Jagr this year. But again, he’s a tremendous player and I’m sure he’ll surface somewhere.”

Goal scoring was a major issue for the Kings in 2016-17 (they were 25th in the NHL) and in recent years they have not been afraid to add older, veteran players to their roster. They still have 35-year-old Marian Gaborik, they added 35-year-old Mike Cammalleri this summer on a one-year deal and even traded for Jarome Iginla late last season. Still, Jagr doesn’t seem to be the “certain fit” the Kings are looking given his age.

Jagr didn’t look quite as good as he had in recent year this past season but he was still able to finish with 46 points (16 goals, 30 assists) while playing in all 82 games.

Even though Jagr has remained in peak physical shape and has maintained a high level of production, he is still going to turn 46 this season, and while he has remained durable enough to play in at least 77 games in every season after turning 40 he has shown signs of really starting to slow down as each season has progressed. He can still be a useful asset on the power play and he still has the hands to make plays and contribute offensively. The best scenario for him might be on a team that paces out his workload over the course of the season with occasional nights off (like in back-to-back situations) and limits his minutes to where he can really excel offensively. But that doesn’t seem to be the sort of thing Jagr would be interested in. So it might take him a little longer to find a team that is willing to give him the salary, and playing time, that he desires.

Report: Canadiens have made an offer to Mark Streit

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The number of free agents that have gone on to sign with their former teams has been remarkable (see Scott Hartnell, Justin Williams, Dominic Moore, Mike Cammalleri, Chad Johnson, and so on), but it sounds like there could be at least one more reunion on the horizon.

According to the Journal de Montreal’s Marc De Foy, the Montreal Canadiens have made a one-year, $1.5 million offer to Mark Streit.

Streit began his career in Montreal after being selected in the ninth round of the 2004 draft. He played for the Habs from 2005 to 2008, and he had his best NHL season in 2007-08 (he put up a career-high 62 points in 81 games).

De Foy also reports that GM Marc Bergevin tried to acquire Streit before the trade deadline, but he was unable to do so because of the salary cap. Instead, the 39-year-old was traded from Philadelphia to Tampa Bay before being dealt to Pittsburgh.

Streit was part of the Penguins team that won the Stanley Cup in the spring, but he only suited up in three games during their run to the final.

He finished last season with six goals and 27 points in 68 contests. He averaged 18:44 of ice time in 2016-17 (19:23 with Philadelphia, 17:06 with Pittsburgh).

Montreal’s interest in him would likely diminish if they found a way to get a contract finalized with free agent Andrei Markov.

Markov is reportedly seeking a two-year contract worth $6 million per year, while Montreal is only offering one year at a lower salary.

Kings hire Pierre Turgeon as ‘offensive coordinator’ assistant coach

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Over the past four years the Los Angeles Kings have been one of the worst offensive teams in hockey, finishing higher than 20th in goals scored just one time during that stretch. Overall, their 2.55 goals per game average during that stretch placed them 23rd in the NHL, pretty far below the league average.

They seem to be trying to change that under new coach John Stevens even if the roster is staying mostly the same.

On Monday the team announced the hiring of Pierre Turgeon as an assistant to help round out their coaching staff, and he will join the team with a very specific role: Offensive coordinator.

“We are thrilled to bring Pierre Turgeon aboard to join John Stevens and our coaching staff. For the first time in LA Kings history we will have one coach strictly dedicated to an ‘Offensive Coordinator’ role,” said Kings team president Luc Robitaille in a statement released by the team.

This will be Turgeon’s first coaching job in the NHL.

No matter what Turgeon’s role is or how good he may be at it the key for the Kings will still be the talent on the ice, and there is still some there with Anze Kopitar, Tyler Toffolli, Tanner Pearson, and Jeff Carter in their top-six. It will be interesting to see if there is more potential for the team offensively in a different system. Darryl Sutter’s Kings teams were all about defense and suffocating the oppositions offensive attack, and while it certainly helped them shut teams down, it did very little to create offense at the other end of the ice.

Turgeon was an outstanding offensive player during his NHL career, scoring 515 goals and 812 assists in 1,294 games with the Buffalo Sabres, St. Louis Blues, New York Islanders, Dallas Stars, Montreal Canadiens and Colorado Avalanche.

“Pierre had great success as a player and has a tremendous hockey background on the whole. He is a person who brings a lot of energy, passion and insight to the job along with a great deal of enthusiasm about the game,” Stevens said in the Kings’ team statement.

“We look forward to him adding to our team, and to our staff, a real team perspective from a person who was a high-end player, especially in the offensive zone. We have talked a lot during the process of building a coaching staff regarding the qualities of the people we wanted to bring aboard. We feel strongly that Pierre will help compliment myself, Dave Lowry, Don Nachbaur and Bill Ranford and we are together looking forward to the start of the season.”

So far this offseason the biggest addition the Kings have made to their roster has been the signing of Mike Cammalleri after he scored 10 goals and 31 total points in 61 games for the New Jersey Devils a season ago. It will be Cammalleri’s second time with the team.

PHT’s 2017 free agent frenzy tracker

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Welcome to Thunderdome!

Come embrace the madness with us. Throughout the weekend, we’ll be keeping tabs on all the UFA signings across the NHL, so check back regularly for all the biggest signings, trades and other acquisitions.

July 2

Patrick Marleau signs in Toronto: three years, $18.75 million (link)

— Steve Oleksy signs in Anaheim: two years (link)

Evgeny Kuznetsov re-signs in Washington: eight years, $62.4 million (link)

July 1

Justin Schultz re-signs with Pittsburgh: three years, $16.5 million (link)

— Tom Sestito, Frank Corrado, Casey DeSmith, Chris Summers, Jarred Tinordi, Zach Trotman, and Greg McKegg also signed with Pittsburgh.

Joe Thornton re-signs in San Jose: one year (link)

Chris Kunitz signs in Tampa Bay: one year, $2 million (link)

Darcy Kuemper signs with Los Angeles: one year, $650K (link)

Radim Vrbata signs in Florida: one year, $2.5 million (link)

Kevin Shattenkirk signs with New York Rangers: four years, $26.6 million (link)

— Brian Strait signed a one-year, two-way deal with New Jersey. Brian Gibbons and Bracken Kearns also signed two-way contracts.

— Zac Rinaldo signs a one-year, two-way deal with Arizona. Also signing with Coyotes: Andrew Campbell, Joel Hanley, and Michael Sislo.

— Ryan Stanton signs in Edmonton: two years, $1.4 million

— Mike McKenna signs in Dallas: one year, $650,000

— Paul Carey signs with New York Rangers: one year, $650,000

— Buddy Robinson signs in Winnipeg: one year, $650,000

Dominic Moore signs in Toronto: one year, $1 million

Patrik Nemeth re-signs in Dallas: one year, $945,000

Kyle Quincey signs in Minnesota: one year, $1.25 million

Nick Cousins re-signs in Arizona: two years, $2 million

— Cal Petersen signs in Los Angeles: two year, $1.85 million (link)

— Kyle Rau signs in Minnesota: one year, $700,000

— Tyler Randell signs in Ottawa: one year, $700,000

— Niklas Svedberg signs in Minnesota: one year, $700,000

— Kenny Agostino signs in Boston: one year, $875,000

— Anthony Peluso signs in Washington: one year, $650,000

— Ty Rattie signs in Edmonton: one year, $700,000

— Anders Lindback signs in Nashville: one year, $650,000

— Matt O’Connor signs in Nashville: one year, $650,000

— Dennis Robertson re-signs in Carolina: one year, $650,000

Luke Witkowski signs in Detroit: one year, $750,000

Jean-Francois Berube signs in Chicago: two years, $1.5 million

— Jordan Osterle signs in Chicago: two years, $1.3 million

— Derek Grant signs in Anaheim: one year, $650,000

— Michael Sgarbossa signs in Winnipeg: one year, $650,000

Anton Rodin re-signs in Vancouver: one year, $700,000

Cam Fowler re-signs in Anaheim: eight years, $52 million (link)

Jeremy Smith signs in Carolina: one year, $750,000

Scott Hartnell signs in Nashville: one year, $1 million (link)

— Seth Griffith signs in Buffalo: one year, $650,000

— Evgeny Dadonov signs in Florida: three years, $12 million (link)

— Dan Girardi signs in Tampa Bay: two years, $6 million (link)

— Cal O’Reilly signs in Minnesota: two years, $1.4 million

— Landon Ferraro signs in Minnesota: two years, $1.4 million

Ron Hainsey signs in Toronto: two years, $6 million (link)

Ryan Miller signs in Anaheim: two years, $4 million (link)

Christian Folin signs in Los Angeles: one year, $850,000

— Patrick Wiercioch signs in Vancouver: one year, $650,000

Mike Cammalleri signs in Los Angeles: one year, $1 million (link)

Adam Clendening signs in Arizona: one year, $775,000

Ryan Murphy signs in Minnesota: one year, $700,000

Chris Thorburn signs in St. Louis: two years, $1.8 million

Oskar Sundqvist re-signs in St. Louis: one year, $675,000

— Beau Bennett signs in St. Louis: one year, $650,000

— Antti Niemi signs in Pittsburgh: one year, $700,000

Paul Postma signs in Boston: one year, $725,000

Josh Jooris signs in Carolina: one year, $775,000

Martin Jones re-signs in San Jose: six years, $34.5 million (link)

Marc-Edouard Vlasic re-signs in San Jose: eight years, $56 million (link)

Justin Williams signs in Carolina: two years, $9 million (link)

Martin Hanzal signs in Dallas: three years, $14.25 million (link)

Tyler Pitlick signs in Dallas: three years, $3 million

Jonathan Bernier signs in Colorado: one year, $2.75 million (link)

Chad Johnson signs in Buffalo: one year, $1.25 million (link)

— Brian Elliott signs in Philly: two years, $5.5 million (link)

Steve Mason signs in Winnipeg: two years, $8.2 million (link)

— Alexander Burmistrov signs in Vancouver: one year, $900,000 (link)

Anders Nilsson signs in Vancouver: two years, $5 million (link)

Michael Del Zotto signs in Vancouver: two years, $6 million (link)

Sam Gagner signs in Vancouver: three years, $9.45 million (link)

Dmitry Kulikov signs in Winnipeg: three years, $13 million (link)

Trevor Daley signs in Detroit: three years, $9.5 million (link)

Patrick Sharp signs in Chicago: one year, $1 million (link)

Matt Hunwick signs in Pittsburgh: three years, $6.75 million (link)

Nick Bonino signs in Nashville: four years, $16.1 million (link)

Benoit Pouliot signs in Buffalo: one year, $1.15 million

Brian Boyle signs in New Jersey: two years, $5.1 million (link)

Alex Petrovic re-signs in Florida: one year, $1.8 million (link)

Nate Thompson signs in Ottawa: two year, $3.3 million (link)

Ondrej Pavelec signs with New York Rangers: one year, $1.3 million (link)

— Garrett Wilson re-signs in Pittsburgh: two years, $1.3 million

— Garret Sparks re-signs in Toronto: two years, $1.35 million (link)

Curtis McElhinney re-signs in Toronto: two years, $1.7 million (link)

Karl Alzner signs in Montreal: five years, $23.125 million (link)

Previous deals of note

Michael Stone re-signs in Calgary: three years, $10.5 million (link)

Dmitry Orlov re-signs in Washington: six years, $30.6 million (link)

Jordan Weal re-signs in Philly: two years, $3.5 million (link)

Kris Versteeg re-signs in Calgary: one year, $1.75 million (link)

Keith Kinkaid re-signs in New Jersey: two years, $2.5 million (link)

Magnus Paajarvi re-signs in St. Louis: one year, $800,000 (link)

Chandler Stephenson re-signs in Washington: two years, $1.3 million (link)

— Dylan McIlrath re-signs in Detroit: two years, $1.3 million (link)

— Brian Lashoff re-signs in Detroit: two years, $1.3 million (link)

Brock McGinn re-signs in Carolina: two years, $1.775 million (link)

Sven Andrighetto re-signs in Colorado: two years, $2.8 million (link)

— Cory Conacher re-signs in Tampa Bay: two years, $1.3 million (link)

Brendan Smith re-signs with New York Rangers: four years, $17.4 million (link)

Mike Condon re-signs in Ottawa: three years, $7.2 million (link)

— Jacob De La Rose re-signs in Montreal: one year, $725,000 (link)

— Pheonix Copley re-signs in Washington: two years, $1.3 million (link)

Noel Acciari re-signs in Boston: two year, $1.45 million (link)

Jordan Schroeder re-signs in Columbus: two years, $1.3 million (link)

Eric Gryba re-signs in Edmonton: two years, $1.8 million (link)

— Max McCormick re-signs in Ottawa: two years, $1.3 million (link)

Brett Connolly re-signs in Washington: two years, $3 million (link)

Tomas Jurco re-signs in Chicago: one year, $850,000 (link)

Anton Forsberg re-signs in Chicago: two years, $1.5 million (link)

Tom Pyatt re-signs in Ottawa: two years, $2.2 million (link)

Zack Kassian re-signs in Edmonton: three years, $5.85 million (link)

Esa Lindell re-signs in Dallas: two years, $4.4 million (link)

Yanni Gourde re-signs in Tampa Bay: two years, $2 million (link)

Andrej Sustr re-signs in Tampa Bay: one year, $1.95 million (link)

Derek Ryan re-signs in Carolina: one year, $1.425 million (link)

Korbinian Holzer re-signs in Anaheim: two years, $1.8 million (link)

Andy Andreoff re-signs in L.A.: two years, $1.355 million (link)