Brock Boeser

PHT Morning Skate: NHL could become a 34-team league in near future

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Welcome to the PHT Morning Skate, a collection of links from around the hockey world. Have a link you want to submit? Email us at phtblog@nbcsports.com.

Andrei Vasilevskiy shut out the St. Louis Blues last night. You can check out the highlights from that game by clicking the video at the top of the page.

• Flames Nation looks at how Seattle possibly getting an expansion team affects the new arena situation in Calgary. (Flames Nation)

• Senators owner Eugene Melnyk has allowed this Erik Karlsson trade talk to get out of hand.in the most ridiculous way. (The Sports Daily)

• We could be heading toward a 34-team NHL in the not-too-distant future. (USA Today)

• Former Senator Alexei Yashin will be taking part in this weekend’s alumni game, but he doesn’t know what kind of reception he’ll get from the Ottawa faithful. (Ottawa Citizen)

• Islanders rookie Mathew Barzal has been a terrific addition to the roster. Barzal carries the puck, creates scoring chances and he draws penalties. (Lighthousehockey.com)

• While Marc-Andre Fleury and Malcolm Subban were both out with injuries, Maxime Lagace was busy saving Vegas’ season. (SinBin.Vegas)

• The Rangers appear to be a pretty good potential trade partner for the Senators, who are looking to make a splash before the Dec. 19 roster freeze. (Blueseatblogs.com)

William Karlsson has been a huge surprise for the Golden Knights this season. Where is all this offensive production coming from? (Fanragsports.com)

• It might be time for the Canadiens to consider a retool that could include trading Max Pacioretty for younger talent. (AllHabs.net)

• Canucks rookie Brock Boeser is on pace to score more goals than Mario Lemieux did during his first year in the NHL. (Dailyhive.com)

Joey Alfieri is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @joeyalfieri.

The Buzzer: Bernier shines for Avs, Rangers waste Pavelec’s great night

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Player Of The Night: Jonathan Bernier, Colorado Avalanche

After losing six out of their past seven games the Colorado Avalanche finally got back into the win column on Saturday night by crushing the Florida Panthers. They followed up that performance by marching into Pittsburgh and stealing two points from the Pittsburgh Penguins in a 2-1 win that was highlighted by a stellar showing from starting goaltender Jonathan Bernier.

Bernier was the Avalanche’s best player on Monday night, turning aside 39 of the 40 shots he faced.

It was not until the final 11 seconds, when the Avalanche were already holding a two-goal lead, that he finally surrendered a goal.

It was probably Bernier’s best performance of the season and just the fifth time in 12 starts that he managed a save percentage higher than .900 in a game.

Wasted Effort Of The Night: The New York Rangers

Maybe “wasted” is too strong of a word considering the Rangers did get a point out of the night in a 2-1 shootout loss to the Dallas Stars, but let’s be honest be here. They did not even deserve that.

The Rangers were thoroughly dominated by the Stars and only managed to get the game to overtime thanks to a stellar performance from goaltender Ondrej Pavelec.

Pavelec stopped 44 of the 45 shots he faced and almost single handedly got the Rangers to overtime.

After the game Rangers coach Alain Vigneault had this to say about the game: “There are two positives, Pavs played unreal and because of his performance we were able to get a point. Other than that….we weren’t good.”

That was it.

Ducks Get Some Help Back In The Lineup

The Anaheim Ducks got some much needed help back in their lineup on Monday night when Ryan Getzlaf and Jakob Silfverberg both returned to the lineup.

Silfverberg made an immediate impact after missing the past five games. He scored his sixth goal of the season in the Ducks’ 3-2 win.

Getzlaf did not factor into the scoring, but having him back in the lineup was still a huge lift for the Ducks. He played 20 minutes in the win.

Highlight Of The Night

The Winnipeg Jets have an outstanding offense. It was on display here with some nifty tic-tac-toe passing to take the lead against the Vancouver Canucks.

Factoid Of The Night

Brock Boeser scored another goal for the Canucks in their loss to the Winnipeg Jets. He is having a tremendous rookie season.

Scores

New York Islanders 3, Washington Capitals 1
Dallas Stars 2, New York Rangers 1
Colorado Avalanche 2, Pittsburgh Penguins 1
Florida Panthers 2, Detroit Red Wings 1
Winnipeg Jets 5, Vancouver Canucks 1
Anaheim Ducks 3, Carolina Hurricanes 2

Adam Gretz is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @AGretz.

Injuries derail best thing about Canucks this season

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Even if you wanted to douse the fire a bit with talk of lucky bounces, it was impossible to totally dismiss the excitement generated by the Vancouver Canucks’ young, shockingly effective top line of Sven Baertschi, Bo Horvat, and Brock Boeser.

As it turns out, regression isn’t what spoiled the party. Instead, two-thirds of that tremendous trio have been dealt significant injuries in a short span.

About a week ago, word surfaced that Horvat would miss about six-to-eight weeks with a broken foot. Monday’s update was similarly grim for Baertschi, as a fractured jaw is expected to cost the winger four-to-six weeks.

Here’s the update from Canucks head coach Travis Green:

You really need to crane your neck to find a silver lining in the dark clouds hanging over the Canucks, who’ve lost two straight games and five of eight.

Some will find it intriguing to see how Boeser, the Canucks’ lethal-scoring and well-coiffed winger, fares with both his partners in crime on the shelf for at least a month.

[Boeser recently channeled Pavel Bure with a sweet goal.]

To his credit, Boeser collected a goal in each of the two games with Horvat sidelined; perhaps some of his ability will simply override linemate concerns? His shot continues to befuddle goalies, as you can see from the video above and also read about in detail via this great breakdown by Justin Bourne of The Athletic (sub required).

When you consider the Canucks’ schedule going forward, what seems like a good opportunity instead becomes something of a mixed blessing.

Mon, Dec 11 @ Winnipeg
Wed, Dec 13 vs Nashville
Fri, Dec 15 vs San Jose
Sun, Dec 17 vs Calgary
Tue, Dec 19 vs Montreal
Thu, Dec 21 @ San Jose
Sat, Dec 23 vs St. Louis
Thu, Dec 28 vs Chicago
Sat, Dec 30 vs Los Angeles
Mon, Jan 2 vs Anaheim
Fri, Jan 6 @ Toronto
Sat, Jan 7 @ Montreal
Mon, Jan 9 @ Washington
Thu, Jan 12 @ Columbus
Sat, Jan 14 @ Minnesota
Fri, Jan 20 @ Edmonton
Sat, Jan 21 @ Winnipeg
Mon, Jan 23 vs Los Angeles
Wed, Jan 25 vs Buffalo
Mon, Jan 30 vs Colorado

As you can see, 2017 ends with some significant opportunities for the Canucks, as their road-weary start pays off to a lot of home-cooking in December. The new year gets off to a rocky start with that seven-game road trip from Jan. 6-21, but the overall haul without one or both of Horvat/Baertschi is reasonably friendly.

Such a stretch might end up sending mixed signals to management, however.

[Top line put on a show against Sidney Crosby and Penguins in early November.]

If the right path is to continue to rebuild while also enjoying unexpected returns thanks to youngsters like Boeser and clever work by Green, then treading water amid injuries might provide too much false hope. Yes, it must be refreshing to at least get the glimmer of a light at the end of the tunnel, but the Canucks still need to look at this situation realistically.

There’s also the possibility that Vancouver will rally, only to really hit a wall during that early-2018 road trip.

Being middle-of-the-road is less depressing in the moment than “tank mode,” yet there’s also the risk of puck purgatory: falling short of the postseason while ruining chances to add more franchise-altering young players like Boeser. He seems like quite the find as the 23rd pick of the 2015 NHL Draft, but recent history shows that you’re most likely to build a winner with lottery-level prospects rather than shrewd, late-first rounders.

Just about any way you slice it, this is a bummer for the Canucks, who lose precious weeks to better gauge a proper value for Baertschi (a pending RFA who should expect a hearty raise from $1.85 million).

James O’Brien is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @cyclelikesedins.

Slashing crackdown, infusion of youth boost NHL scoring

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By Stephen Whyno (AP Hockey Writer)

The nets aren’t bigger, the goaltenders aren’t smaller and yet scoring is up significantly around the NHL.

Through the first two months of the season, goals are up more than 12 percent from the same time a year ago, including a whopping 14 percent increase on the power play and a 38 percent spike in short-handed goals.

”That’s what the league wanted,” San Jose Sharks defenseman Marc Edouard-Vlasic said. ”The league has done everything in their power to make there more goals out there, and that’s exactly what’s going on.”

The uptick can be credited to a concerted crackdown on slashing by issuing more penalties and a league-wide move toward younger and more skilled players. The current pace of 6.01 goals per game would be the highest since 2005-06, when a series of rule changes were put in to open up the game and get more scoring to attract new fans.

”Teams try to go for it more,” said New York Rangers goaltender Henrik Lundqvist, whose goals-against average is 2.66, nearly 13 percent higher than it was at this point a year ago. ”Most teams are trying to go for it, have this fast hockey, leave the zone quickly and it opens it up.”

Deputy NHL Commissioner Bill Daly said general managers are pleased with the current pace, which has lasted beyond the typical high-scoring October as defenses settle in for the season. Stricter enforcement of slashing was designed to reduce hand and wrist injuries, though it has had a positive effect on offense with defenders unable to whack at puck carriers’ sticks in an effort to stop them.

”I do think that has created certainly more room for our players to be offensive,” Daly said. ”I think over time, clearly since we increased the standard for hooking and holding and interference (in 2005-06), slashing has become a way to defend and an effective way to defend, and I think this year it’s a less effective way to defend.”

Players have noticed, even if some are frustrated at the varying degrees of what rises to the level of a slashing penalty. Every referee is watching closely.

”The last five years, you could do so much more with your stick and probably now lots of players are afraid to use their sticks,” Los Angeles Kings forward Jussi Jokinen said. ”I think everybody wants to see more goals, so scoring being up, I think it’s good.”

Everyone except maybe the goaltenders may think so, but it’s not like they’ve been terrible. Four goalies who have played at least 20 games have a save percentage of .930 or higher.

”The goaltenders, they haven’t been any better than they are right now and some of them are still getting lit up pretty good,” said Washington Capitals coach Barry Trotz, who has the league’s leading goal-scorer in Alex Ovechkin.

Certainly the emphasis on slashing has helped players such as Ovechkin, Calgary’s Johnny Gaudreau and New York Islanders star John Tavares, who can do wonders with even a few extra inches of space. Columbus Blue Jackets forward Josh Anderson, who scored 10 goals in his first 15 games, said slashing is on everyone’s mind and ”guys are not getting (their sticks) up into the hands as much as they used to.”

Slashing and otherwise, there have been 173 more power plays than last season and teams are converting on 19.7 percent of them. Almost half the league is at or above 20 percent. The massive increase in short-handed goals has a lot to do with aggressive penalty kills stocked with offensive-minded players more likely to score.

”That’s one more thing that the power play has to worry about,” Capitals winger T.J. Oshie said. ”Now they don’t just have to worry about scoring goals. They have to worry about their turnovers, what plays they make, how risky they want to get because there is that chance if it goes the other way and it’s a 2-on-1, it could end up in the back of your net.”

Los Angeles coach John Stevens said teams are in ”attack mode” all the time now, and Trotz estimates that he spends three-quarters of time trying to figure out how to score more.

But risk is also inherent in the NHL getting younger and featuring so many rookie scorers such as Arizona’s Clayton Keller, Chicago’s Alex DeBrincat and Vancouver’s Brock Boeser. The average age of an NHL player is 27 and Daly said the number has dropped over the past several years. He said more scoring is a byproduct as junior hockey and college programs get better at making players NHL-ready sooner.

Team composition has also changed. There are fewer journeyman faceoff specialists and grinders, and more players kept for speed and skill.

”Just the mold of all teams is kind of changing: They’re going for smaller, skilled guys rather than guys who are two-way forwards and stuff like that,” said Kings defenseman Drew Doughty, who is all of 27. ”These young kids have unbelievable skill, too. It’s kind of crazy how much skill. They have things they grew up getting taught how to do those things, which we didn’t have access to when we were kids.”

For all the offense so far, there are those who don’t expect it to keep happening. Goals were up through October last season and the NHL finished averaging 5.54 per game. DeBoer said teams often tighten their systems and structure after Christmas, making it more difficult to score.

”I think it’s still early to say,” Blackhawks winger Richard Panik said. ”The game is going to get tighter. It always does before playoffs.”

Let’s go deep on Flyers’ 10-game losing streak

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When fans are booing you out of the building and management is straining to defend you, things can start to get out of hand.

The Philadelphia Flyers will either end their current 10-game losing streak or see it go to 11 games on Monday as they take on the Flames in Calgary. PHT will monitor that contest, but in the meantime, it might be entertaining, informative, and yes, a bit frustrating to see how the wheels came off.

Will there be some themes to this 10-game skid? Yes, it seems there will be.

Games 1 and 2: Shutout losses to the Wild (1-0 at home on Nov. 11; 3-0 in Minnesota on Nov. 14)

For Wild fans, Devan Dubnyk‘s shutout streak probably feels pretty distant right now. Still, his hot run really cooled off the Flyers, as Dubnyk stopped 32 and 30 shots for those goose eggs.

[More on Dubnyk’s hot streak here.]

Game 3: 3-2 shootout loss to the Jets.

One theme, at least early on, of this losing streak is blown leads. In the case of this contest against Winnipeg, the trio of Sean Couturier, Jakub Voracek, and Claude Giroux helped the Flyers build a 2-0 lead through the first period, with that second tally coming about five minutes into the opening frame.

The Jets’ second goal really had to sting, as Mark Scheifele sent the contest into overtime with less than a minute remaining in regulation.

Game 4: Flames 5, Flyers 4 (OT).

Another game where a substantial first-period lead eventually dissolved into a defeat.

In this case, Philly went up 1-0 and then 3-1 in the opening frame. Sean Monahan, Johnny Gaudreau, and the Flames turned the game on its head in the second period, which included Monahan’s first NHL hat trick:

Game 5: Canucks win 5-2.

The Flyers scored first in this one, but that lead only lasted for 1:12 before things quickly went off the rails. Brock Boeser scored twice and Daniel Sedin had a rare strong night during a fading season with two points.

Game 6 and 7: Two OT losses against the Islanders.

On Nov. 22, the Flyers saw leads go away, and then John Tavares ended the game with this outstanding combination of will and skill:

The second contest probably generated more unrest, as the Flyers squandered a 4-2 lead heading into the third period, ultimately seeing Nick Leddy‘s OT goal extend the misery.

Game 8: The temperature rises another level with another squandered lead, and an OT loss to the hated Penguins.

While Pittsburgh generated a 1-0 lead through the first 20 minutes, the Flyers exploded for three goals to make it 3-1 entering the final frame. Even with things crumbling, they shook off the game being tied 3-3 to take one more advantage at 4-3, only to see Jake Guentzel send it to overtime with a late tally.

Then, to turn the knife in deeper, it was Sidney Crosby who scored the game-clincher:

And tweets like these started to surface.

Game 9: Boos and votes of confidence.

With a 3-1 loss to the San Jose Sharks for their ninth in a row, things were getting pretty ugly in Philly.

[Ron Hextall gives Dave Hakstol the vote of confidence]

Game 10: After losing 3-1 to the Sharks, the Flyers dropped a 3-0 defeat to the Boston Bruins.

***

Basically, the Flyers have either been shut out/blown out of games or given up significant leads during this 10-game skid, generating five standings points in the process. Really, this slump could probably be traced back longer; Philly began 2017-18 with a 5-3-0 record, yet now they find themselves at 8-11-7. Yes, that means 15 losses in their last 18 contests.

Maybe Hextall is correct in believing that this team hasn’t played poorly as of late, but they also haven’t played particularly well. It might just be that this squad, as constructed – or with its current coach, or both – simply stands in hockey purgatory.

Monday presents another opportunity for the Flyers to end this streak, as they take on the Flames in Calgary to begin a three-game road trip. If they don’t get it together, we’ll once again learn that votes of confidence only mean so much.

James O’Brien is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @cyclelikesedins.