Alex Burrows


Waivers: Oduya to Flyers; No one claims Burrows


GMs are busy during these late dates in the trade deadline, and that goes beyond merely working the phones to try to get a good deal.

The waiver wire is another scene of noteworthy activity, even if sometimes the most interesting activities come in teams passing on claiming someone off of waivers. This is one of those cases. Let’s look at what happened:

  • The Senators placed Alex Burrows on waivers, but no dice. Burrows’ experience feels like a microcosm of the Sens: his situation is in question almost a year to the day after being traded to Ottawa in exchange for prospect Jonathan Dahlen. It was a controversial decision at the time, and the Senators doubled down by signing Burrows to a two-year, $5 million contract extension.

Whether he heads to the AHL or just hovers around in Ottawa, that $2.5M lingers in 2018-19. Not great for a team that’s pinching pennies.

  • A different Senators player did get claimed, as the Philadelphia Flyers grabbed aging defenseman Johnny Oduya. This gives a young group a veteran presence, even if Oduya’s on the decline. Meanwhile, the Flyers waived Mark Alt, who was summarily claimed by the Colorado Avalanche.

  • The Calgary Flames love their beefy players who can score at a modest clip. They paid big money for Troy Brouwer, only to see him go from a nice-enough scorer to a modest one. With some injury questions lingering in a few spots, the Flames claimed Chris Stewart from the Wild.

Bruce Boudreau is clearly still fond of Stewart.


Chances are, these players aren’t going to be huge difference-makers, but some might argue the same for a lot of players involved in today’s trades. At least in these cases, waiver claims only cost teams roster spots and cap space.

More: PHT’s 2018 Trade Deadline Tracker.

James O’Brien is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at or follow him on Twitter @cyclelikesedins.

Taylor Hall sets Devils franchise record with 16-game point streak

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Taylor Hall did something on Thursday night that no other New Jersey Devils player has in the team’s history.

With an assist on Nico Hischier‘s third-period goal, Hall extended his point streak to 16 games.

Hall has 11 goals and 24 points during the streak. And perhaps what is most impressive about his hot run is how much punishment he’s taken while on it.

Many will remember the attack Hall endured from Alex Burrows on Feb. 6.

Burrows, who was later suspended 10-games for his antics, appeared to drive his knee into the back of Hall’s head twice, this after jumping him from behind.

And then a few nights ago, Hall was on the receiving end of a devastating (but clean) hit from Philadelphia Flyers forward Radko Gudas.

Hall actually scored on the play, and despite appearing very shaken up, returned to the game later on.

Hall also nearly ended his streak on his own accord after a dangerous hit from behind on Buffalo Sabres forward Kyle Okposo.

Hall escaped suspension on the hit, getting hit in the wallet to the tune of $5,000 in lieu.

Scott Billeck is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at or follow him on Twitter @scottbilleck

Brown gets one-game suspension for kneeing Sergachev


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Earlier today, the NHL’s Department of Player Safety announced that they wanted to talk to Kings forward Dustin Brown for an incident that took place in last night’s game against the Tampa Bay Lightning. Brown received a major penalty and a game misconduct for kneeing Bolts defenseman Mikhail Sergachev (top). Tonight, the league announced that they’ve decided to suspend Brown for one game.

But is sitting him down for one game enough of a punishment?

Let’s keep in mind that he didn’t miss all of Saturday’s game, but he was tossed at the 14:30 mark of the second period. So he missed less than half the game.

Although he’s not a repeat offender in the league’s eyes, this isn’t the first time that Brown has crossed the line on the ice. Heck, this isn’t even the first time he’s used his knee to inflict pain on an opponent. In the 2012 playoffs, he injured Coyotes defenseman Michal Rozsival on a similar play.

Obviously, this incident happened almost six years ago, so it doesn’t factor into this suspension, but how many more dangerous plays is the Kings forward going to make before the league decides to send him a clear message.

As the league mentioned in their explanation of the suspension, Brown had “sufficient time to attempt a legal, full body hit, or allow Sergachev to pass by him untouched. Instead, he extends his knee to ensure contact will be made”. At this point, the league has hit the nail right on the head with their wording. This is clearly something the veteran could have avoided.

But here’s where the league’s wording gets kind of questionable: “And while we do not believe that this is a malicious or planned attempt to injure an opponent, the onus remains on the hitter to deliver a legal check.”

It may not have been pre-meditated because it happened in a split-second, but what exactly was Brown trying to do? That’s an incredibly dangerous play. Sergachev, who managed to return to the game, could’ve been seriously hurt.

George Parros did well to suspend Alex Burrows 10 games for kneeing Taylor Hall in the head repeatedly last week. That type of punishment definitely sent a message to Burrows and the rest of the league. Unfortunately, you can’t help but feel like this incident involving Brown is a “swing and a miss” for the Department of Player Safety.

Joey Alfieri is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at or follow him on Twitter @joeyalfieri.

The Buzzer: Schenn fights, scores twice; Hoffman hits 100

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Players of the Night:

Brayden Schenn, St. Louis Blues: Another player who scored twice on Thursday night. Schenn set the tone early, fighting Colorado Avalanche captain Gabriel Landeskog three seconds after puck drop in the first period. He backed that up with his 22nd and 23rd goals of the season.

Sean Monahan, Calgary Flames: Boring Sean Monahan has 27 goals on the season after scoring a brace in the Flames 3-2 win against the New Jersey Devils.

P.K. Subban, Nashville Predators: Subban also score two goals, including the game-tying goal late in the third period to force overtime against the Ottawa Senators. Subban’s second goal was his 15th of the season, matching a career-high.

Nick Cousins, Arizona Coyotes: OK, last one. Cousins scored twice, and his second with 19 seconds left in the third period forced overtime, where Clayton Keller fired home the winner to give the desert dogs a 4-3 come-from-behind win.

Other two-goal scorers: Tyler Seguin, Travis Konecny and Joe Pavelski.

Highlights of the Night:

Mike Hoffman scored his 100th NHL goal in style:


Kyle Turris got a nice welcome back to Ottawa:

Factoids of the Night:

A reminder of how good John Klingberg has been:

Boeser doing more things:



Flames 3, Devils 2

Flyers 5, Canadiens 3

Senators 4, Predators 3 (OT)

Lightning 5, Canucks 2

Blues 6, Avalanche 1

Coyotes 4, Wild 3 (OT)

Stars 4, Blackhawks 2

Golden Knights 5, Sharks 3

Scott Billeck is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at or follow him on Twitter @scottbilleck

Alex Burrows won’t appeal, accepts 10-game suspension


Alex Burrows is choosing to accept his 10-game suspension.

A day after the NHL brought down the ban hammer on the Ottawa Senators forward following a senseless attack on New Jersey Devils forward Taylor Hall — one that included a couple of knees to a downed opponent — Burrows made the wise decision not to appeal his lengthy spell away from the game.

In a tweet from the NHLPA on Thursday, Burrows expressed his relief to see Hall wasn’t injured during his tirade.

“I have received the NHL Department of Player Safety’s decision, following the incident I was involved in during Tuesday night’s game,” Burrows was quoted. “The situation was one in which I recognize I let my emotions get the better of me, and it was a relief to see that Taylor Hall was not injured.

“I have decided to accept the NHL’s decision, and will not be appealing it. I will have no further comment regarding this matter.”

Hall, who thought Burrows had lost his mind after Tuesday’s game, seemed content with the ruling from the league’s player safety department.

Speaking to Andrew Gross of The Record in North Jersey on Thursday, Hall said he feels the league saw the play for what it was.

“I think what they’re saying is it’s not really a hockey play. It’s not something you want to see in the game,” Hall said. “It’s a lot of games.

“I don’t know what his reaction was or his reasoning, but it’s something where the reason it is so high is (because) they just want to exterminate it. They don’t want to see it again.”

Added Hall: “You always want to see the league stand up for its players. At the end of the day, we’re just trying to make it a safer game. I think in instances like that where it’s not really a hockey play, you like to see the league standing up for you there.”

Scott Billeck is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at or follow him on Twitter @scottbilleck