2014 NHL Stanley Cup Final - Game Five

Oilers know Pouliot can help even if he isn’t scoring


Outside of “advanced stats” quarters, Benoit Pouliot has long been considered a bust considering the notion that his scoring numbers haven’t matched up with the expectations that come with being the fourth pick of the 2005 NHL Draft. After all that time, it seems like the hockey world is finally ready to embrace what he can do well … only now he must justify that surprising five-year, $20 million contract.

While fans might want big goal and assist totals considering that $4 million cap hit, it sounds like the Oilers are properly identifying him as a potential possession-shifting forward.

GM Craig MacTavish gave off that vibe to NHL.com, at least.

“It’s the work ethic really for me,” MacTavish said. “He’s an excellent skater who closes gaps and is able to get quickly to forechecks, and it’s something that was sorely lacking in our game throughout our lineup. We think that Benoit is going to provide that, and he’s got some ability to finish as well.”

Many have christened this “the summer of advanced stats” and the Oilers’ offseason signings make a pretty strong argument in that regard.

Again, Pouliot might not be well-equipped to silence some critics considering the likelihood that he won’t score dramatically more than before – he’s already 27, after all – but the signing could pay off if expectations are adjusted properly. Pouliot sounded comfortable with a role as a heavy-lifter while discussing that possibility with Oilers Nation, at least.

“Yeah, but that’s fine. You know what, I like that, I like that a lot,” Pouliot said. “I think that last year was the same way, we were a third line. They put us out there with the big players, even in playoffs. In Pitts we got stuck against [Sidney Crosby] the whole playoffs and we did a great job.

“So I thrive to be good defensively. I like it, I like to be able to get the puck out, have a good stick, or all of the details like that. I don’t mind that, it causes us to go on the forecheck on the offense and after that we take care of business.”

It might not always be pretty, but Edmonton needed more players who are adept at doing the dirty work.

Video: Flyers, Bolts confirm 3-on-3 OT is pretty much the greatest thing ever

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Well, the NHL’s two new initiatives for ’15-16 seem to be going swimmingly.

Not long after Ottawa successfully made the second-ever coach’s challenge, fans got their first look at 3-on-3 overtime.

And what a look it was.

In the span of 137 seconds, the Tampa Bay Lightning and Philadelphia Flyers combined for eight shots on goal, a few breakaways, some tremendous saves — including one on a penalty shot — and, finally, Jason Garrison‘s game-winning goal on a breakaway from center, giving the Bolts a 3-2 win.

It was, in a word, fun.

Lots of fun.

A quick sampling of reviews:

Of course, not everybody was a fan:

Now, to temper things a bit — this was the first time we’ve seen 3-on-3 with something on the line, so there was a novelty factor at play. There’s also no guaranteeing future OT sessions will be as exciting as this.

But none of that takes away from the fact 3-on-3 made for appointment viewing, and immense entertainment value. The prospect of future games like this? That’s pretty exciting.

In Jets return, Burmistrov delivers headshot to Bergeron (Updated)


Didn’t take long for Alex Burmistrov to make his presence felt — though not in a good way.

Burmistrov, playing in his first game for the Jets after a two-year stint in Russia, delivered a questionable elbow to the head of Boston’s Patrice Bergeron late in the first period of Thursday’s season-opener:

Burmistrov received a two-minute minor for an illegal check to the head, while Bergeron received a matching minor for roughing (retaliating for the elbow, specifically).

The Bruins went into the intermission leading 1-0, and have yet to update Bergeron’s status.

Update: Bergeron stayed in the game, but B’s head coach Claude Julien was none too pleased with the hit. Following the game, he called for the NHL’s Department of Player Safety to look at it…