Bertuzzi Moore

Report: Bertuzzi-Moore case settled out of court (Update: Bertuzzi’s lawyer confirms)


Sounds as though one of the NHL’s longest-running sagas has come to an end.

The Steve Moore-Todd Bertuzzi civil suit, which began eight years ago, has been settled out of court, according to reports from Sportsnet and ESPN. The move comes roughly one month prior to the start of civil trial, which was expected to begin sometime in September and set to feature a number of high-ranking NHL officials — commissioner Gary Bettman and deputy commissioner Bill Daly were prepared to testify, and former Canucks owner John McCaw had been ordered to take the stand.

UPDATE: Bertuzzi’s lawyer confirmed that a settlement has been reached, per the Canadian Press.

It was also possible that a slew of NHL players, coaches and front-office executives could’ve been called to testify.

At the moment, it’s unclear what financial settlement Bertuzzi and Moore agreed upon. Back in early July, reports broke that the former Colorado Avalanche forward was seeking $68 million in damages — up from $38 million — stemming from a 2004 on-ice attack in which Bertuzzi jumped Moore from behind and slammed him to the ice.

Moore suffered a concussion and three fractured vertebrae in the wake of the attack, and hasn’t played hockey since.

More, from CBC:

 “Steve Moore is unable to obtain employment commensurate to anywhere near his high intellect and Harvard degree,” Danson told the court, referring to reports by career experts he has filed.

But the lawyer for Orca Bay, the former owner of the Vancouver Canucks, argued otherwise.

Alan D’Silva referred to applications Moore made to the Harvard and Stanford MBA programs in 2010 in which Moore writes about receiving $104,000 for work.

Moore wrote the Graduate Management Admissions Test as part of his applications and scored in the 88th percentile.

Danson countered that this was a family business deal and Moore’s role was minimal.

“It’s not income from employment in the normal way,” said Danson.

Regarding the dollar figures, it’s worth noting that in February of 2012, Bertuzzi signed a two-year, $4.15 million contract extension with the Detroit Red Wings — a deal that bumped his career earnings to $47 million (per CapGeek). That contract expired on July 1, however, and Bertuzzi is now currently an unsigned UFA.

Jason Demers tweets #FreeTorres, gets mocked

Los Angeles Kings v San Jose Sharks - Game One

Following his stunning 41-game suspension, it looks like Raffi Torres has at least one former teammate in his corner.

We haven’t yet seen how the San Jose Sharks or the NHLPA are reacting to the league’s hammer-dropping decision to punish Torres for his Torres-like hit on Jakob Silfverberg, but Jason Demers decided to put in a good word for Torres tonight.

It was a simple message: “#FreeTorres.”

Demers, now of the Dallas Stars, was once with Torres and the Sharks. (In case this post’s main image didn’t make that clear enough already.)

Perhaps this will become “a thing” at some point.

So far, it seems like it’s instead “a thing (that people are making fun of).”

… You get the idea.

The bottom line is that there are some who either a) blindly support Torres because they’re Sharks fans or b) simply think that the punishment was excessive.

The most important statement came from the Department of Player Safety, though.

Bruins list Chara on IR, for now

Zdeno Chara

Those who feel as though the Boston Bruins may rebound – John Tortorella, maybe? – likely rest some of their optimism on the back of a healthy Zdeno Chara.

It’s possible that he’s merely limping into what may otherwise be a healthy 2015-16 season, but it’s definitely looking like a slow start thanks to a lower-body injury.

The latest sign of a bumpy beginning came on Monday, as several onlookers (including’s Joe Haggerty) pointed out that Chara was listed on injured reserve.

As Haggerty notes, that move is retroactive to Sept. 24, so his status really just opens up options for the Bruins.

Still … it’s a little unsettling, isn’t it?

The Bruins likely realize that they need to transition away from their generational behemoth, but last season provided a stark suggestion that may not be ready yet. Trading Dougie Hamilton and losing Dennis Seidenberg to injury only make them more dependent on the towering 38-year-old.

This isn’t really something to panic about, yet it might leave a few extra seats open on the Bruins’ bandwagon.