Ryan Miller

Don’t like the Ryan Miller signing, Canucks fans? Consider the 2011-12 Leafs


For a good example of the scenario that Canucks general manager Jim Benning wanted to avoid next season, consider the 2011-12 Toronto Maple Leafs.

That was the Leafs team that went into the season with James Reimer and Jonas Gustavsson as their two goalies, despite the pair having combined for just 95 starts in NHL.

It did not go well for the Leafs, who, like the Canucks, play in a high-pressure Canadian market that can be particularly hard on goalies. Reimer, after an excellent 2010-11 rookie campaign that gave management confidence he could do it again, suffered a head injury in October and his game remained off all season. Meanwhile, Gustavsson mostly struggled when called upon, while Ben Scrivens and Jussi Rynnas weren’t any better.

The Leafs finished 12 points out of the playoffs and with the second-lowest save percentage in the league (.898). And while the experience didn’t completely ruin Reimer, it still gets referenced to this day and contributed in part to Toronto’s acquisition of Jonathan Bernier, who’s since taken over as the starter. The future for Reimer as a Leaf remains very much up in the air.

The Canucks could have gone into the 2014-15 season with a similar goalie tandem to that Leafs team. They could’ve gone with Eddie Lack, who impressed as a rookie in 2013-14, as the starter. They could’ve had Jacob Markstrom as the back-up. Combined, those two have 78 career NHL starts.

And hey, it might’ve worked out great. Goaltending is an unpredictable position. Teams don’t necessarily need big-money goalies to be successful. Lack and Markstrom have a lot of potential, too.

But instead of rolling the dice on youth and inexperience, Benning signed veteran Ryan Miller to a three-year, $18 million contract.

“He’s going to give our team confidence,” said Benning. “I think goaltending is the most important position on the team.”

The Miller signing was also clear evidence that the objective in Vancouver is to make the playoffs. It’s not to enter the Connor McDavid sweepstakes.

Said president of hockey operations Trevor Linden, to The Province: “We can’t have Daniel [Sedin] and Henrik [Sedin], Alex Burrows and Chris Higgins, all these veterans, and not give them every chance they need to win. As much as we felt Lack made great steps last year, Jim believes goaltending is the most important position in the game. He needed to know every night we had a chance to win and we’re going to be good in that position. That’s the foundation of your team. Nothing destroys confidence faster if you struggle at that position. We weren’t willing to risk that, and the three-year term gave us some flexibility.”

As poorly as Miller performed during his short stint in St. Louis, the 34-year-old was remarkably consistent during his many years with the Buffalo Sabres. In fact, from 2008-09 to 2013-14, his save percentage never finished below .915.

And at least publicly, Lack has been on board with the Miller signing.

“Ryan has been a great goalie in the league for a long time,” he told NHL.com, “and I’m going to try to learn from him.”

Report: Islanders cut first-rounder Barzal from camp

Mathew Barzal
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It seems Mathew Barzal has played in his last game in a New York Islanders’ uniform for a little while.

Barzal took part in the Islanders’ preseason finale against the Washington Capitals on Sunday, but after that contest the Islanders decided to return him to WHL Seattle, per Newsday’s Arthur Staple.

He was taken with the 16th overall pick in 2015 NHL Entry Draft. That selection was well-traveled as it originally belonged to the Pittsburgh Penguins, but was involved in the David Perron trade and then moved to the Islanders as part of Edmonton’s deal to get Griffin Reinhart.

Barzal is noteworthy for his skill and speed, but he may have slipped in the draft due to a knee injury he sustained during the 2014-15 campaign.

The Islanders also reassigned Kirill Petrov, Kevin Czuczman, Scott Mayfield, and Adam Pelech to the AHL’s Bridgeport Sound Tigers.

Torres offered in-person hearing, potentially setting up long suspension

Torres hit

What will Raffi Torres get this time?

The 33-year-old forward that has become known primarily for his controversial hits has once again put himself in the sights of the NHL’s Department of Players Safety. They confirmed that he was offered an in-person hearing following his hit on Jakub Silfverberg Saturday night. He declined the opportunity to meet with them face-to-face, but the offer itself is an important detail because it gives the league the option to suspend him for more than five games.

It certainly seems like the stage is set for a lengthy suspension. While Torres is not considered a repeat offender as his last suspension came more than 18 months ago, the NHL still retains the right to consider his history when deciding on this matter.

Among other incidents, he was once was banned from 25 games for his hit on Marian Hossa in 2012, although it was later reduced to 21 contests after an appeal. The NHL found that Torres was guilty of breaking three rules for that hit; namely interference, charging, and illegally hitting the head. The NHL is reviewing Torres’ latest incident for the same three violations.

You can see the hit below:

And here it is slowed down:

Torres got a match penalty and Silfverberg left the game. Fortunately, Ducks coach Bruce Boudreau said that Silfverberg could have returned, but was kept out for precautionary reasons.