Anaheim Ducks Announce Bruce Boudreau

On Anaheim’s defense, and finding ‘that guy’


Over the last few years, winning a Stanley Cup and having a stud d-man have often gone hand-in-hand. Chicago had Duncan Keith, Los Angeles had Drew Doughty, Boston had Zdeno Chara, Detroit had Nicklas Lidstrom and, in 2007, the Ducks had Chris Pronger.

Also, and Scott Niedermayer.

The two Norris winners were instrumental in Anaheim’s dominant campaign — a 110-point regular season, followed by a playoff run in which the Ducks only lost five games total. As such, Pronger and Niedermayer are forever etched in Ducks lore, the anchors of the first and only Cup champion in franchise history.

Which brings us to the modern-day Ducks.

Heading into next season, they project to have a top-six defense of Cam Fowler, Francois Beauchemin, Hampus Lindholm, Bryan Allen, Ben Lovejoy and Sami Vatanen (Sheldon Souray’s future remains uncertain). It’s a decent group, but one that lacks a true stud blueliner — Fowler may be that guy one day, but he’s not there yet — and it’s something even GM Bob Murray admits is lacking.

“You watch the Kings, for example, and you watch how Drew Doughty has emerged as a superstar,” Murray said earlier this summer. “Do we have a defenseman who can be that way? When we won the Stanley Cup, we had [Niedermayer and Pronger].

“That’s in the back of my mind all the time. Where is that guy, can you find that guy, and can you afford that guy?”

A curious statement.

“Afford” is something worth paying attention to. The Ducks are in win-now mode; Ryan Kesler all but cemented that following his blockbuster move to Anaheim by saying “I’m going to Anaheim to win a championship.” Yet the club must know that, barring remarkable development from Fowler (or Lindholm, I suppose), it doesn’t exactly have the blueline for a championship blueprint.


Murray is the reigning GM of the year, and the fruits of his work are currently on display. While questions remain on D and in goal — where the largely inexperienced Frederik Anderson and wunderkind John Gibson will battle for minutes — the Ducks are still one of the West’s elite teams, and doing it nearly $11 million under the salary cap. They’ve got young guys on inexpensive deals contributing significantly and while they won’t be a spend-to-the-cap team, Murray has positioned them well to add salary.

Heck, they could be a prime candidate to obtain a rental at the deadline.

Now, it’s worth mentioning that stud defensemen rarely become available. Most are playing on good teams challenging for the playoffs; ones on bad teams are still deemed far too valuable to trade away. But things change quickly in the NHL — look at the Kesler deal. In October, Kesler was playing tons of minutes on Vancouver’s top line with the Sedins and scored eight goals and 11 points in his first 15 games. Months later, the Canucks are a train wreck and he’s asking out of town.

And eventually ended up in Anaheim.

So, what does it mean for the Ducks moving forward? It’s safe to assume they’ll be on the lookout for defensive improvements throughout the year and even if they’re unable to land “that guy,” they could still find a quality rearguard to bolster what they’ve got.

Defense is clearly issue No. 1 for this squad — just look at our poll results from earlier today.

Poll: What is the biggest concern for the Ducks?

Report: Islanders cut first-rounder Barzal from camp

Mathew Barzal
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It seems Mathew Barzal has played in his last game in a New York Islanders’ uniform for a little while.

Barzal took part in the Islanders’ preseason finale against the Washington Capitals on Sunday, but after that contest the Islanders decided to return him to WHL Seattle, per Newsday’s Arthur Staple.

He was taken with the 16th overall pick in 2015 NHL Entry Draft. That selection was well-traveled as it originally belonged to the Pittsburgh Penguins, but was involved in the David Perron trade and then moved to the Islanders as part of Edmonton’s deal to get Griffin Reinhart.

Barzal is noteworthy for his skill and speed, but he may have slipped in the draft due to a knee injury he sustained during the 2014-15 campaign.

The Islanders also reassigned Kirill Petrov, Kevin Czuczman, Scott Mayfield, and Adam Pelech to the AHL’s Bridgeport Sound Tigers.

Torres offered in-person hearing, potentially setting up long suspension

Torres hit

What will Raffi Torres get this time?

The 33-year-old forward that has become known primarily for his controversial hits has once again put himself in the sights of the NHL’s Department of Players Safety. They confirmed that he was offered an in-person hearing following his hit on Jakub Silfverberg Saturday night. He declined the opportunity to meet with them face-to-face, but the offer itself is an important detail because it gives the league the option to suspend him for more than five games.

It certainly seems like the stage is set for a lengthy suspension. While Torres is not considered a repeat offender as his last suspension came more than 18 months ago, the NHL still retains the right to consider his history when deciding on this matter.

Among other incidents, he was once was banned from 25 games for his hit on Marian Hossa in 2012, although it was later reduced to 21 contests after an appeal. The NHL found that Torres was guilty of breaking three rules for that hit; namely interference, charging, and illegally hitting the head. The NHL is reviewing Torres’ latest incident for the same three violations.

You can see the hit below:

And here it is slowed down:

Torres got a match penalty and Silfverberg left the game. Fortunately, Ducks coach Bruce Boudreau said that Silfverberg could have returned, but was kept out for precautionary reasons.