Babcock on analytics: ‘I love the information’


It might be hasty to call him “Moneyball” Mike Babcock, but the Detroit Red Wings’ head coach is a fan of analytics.

He told NHL.com’s Dan Rosen as much, noting that the Red Wings don’t have an analytics guy on staff yet, but also stating his belief that it’s just a matter of time.

“I love the information,” Babcock said.

The two-time Olympic gold medal-winner, one-time Stanley Cup champion and all-around decorated bench boss believes that teams will have more resources to spend on stats-minded staffers as time goes on.

Those interested in “fancy stats” will probably find themselves nodding at this statement, in particular:

Indeed, it might be a work in progress, as Red Wings GM Ken Holland seemed reluctant to fully embrace “advanced stats” according to what he said to The Hockey News.

“We’ve been talking about it, but I wouldn’t say it’s a big factor in any of our decision making,” Holland said. “Let’s say you’re Pavel Datsyuk’s linemate. You move to another team and not playing with Pavel Datsyuk is going to have an effect on your lack of success. With baseball, it’s more black and white because the pitcher is on the mound and he’s going against the batter. But in hockey, you’ve got four teammates and five opponents who are going to have some impact on what’s going to happen.”

(If you hear some grumbling, it’s likely from those who are going great lengths to account for context or merely people who note that there are other stats out there beyond Corsi and Fenwick-related numbers.)

Of course, it could also be a matter of semantics, as many simply prefer to refer to Corsi or Fenwick events as “shot attempts.”

Either way, it’s probably a step in the right direction for Babcock at least to be intrigued by it all. Red Wings blog Winging It in Motown seems excited by the potential:

Is it happening? Are the gut analyses on their way out? We aren’t too sure, but as a fan of analyzing players using advanced statistical data, I sure hope so. It shows signs of forward-looking enlightenment for a team who is in need of a new approach to player analysis. With advanced statistics, you can see that players like Luke Glendening are badly overplayed (even though it should be obvious by the common eye-test), and players like Riley Sheahan are turning to prodigious possession powerhouses. Is this it? Is it time for the advanced stat revolution in Detroit? Don’t know.. But boy oh boy, do I sure hope so.

Overall, we’ve seen some surprising revelations in teams embracing new ideas lately, maybe most shockingly in the Toronto Maple Leafs’ decision to hire Kyle Dubas as assistant GM.

If nothing else, we can all amuse ourselves imagining Babcock making these faces while pouring over a spreadsheet:

source: Getty Images
Credit: Getty Images
source: Getty Images
Credit: Getty Images
source: AP
Credit: AP

Lucic: If I wanted to hurt Couture, ‘I would have hurt him’


Last night in Los Angeles, Kings forward Milan Lucic received a match penalty after skating the entire width of the ice to give San Jose’s Logan Couture a two-hand shove to the face.

Lucic didn’t hurt Couture, who had caught Lucic with an open-ice hit that Lucic didn’t like. Couture’s smiling, mocking face was good evidence that the Sharks’ forward was going to be OK.

This morning, Lucic was still in disbelief that he was penalized so harshly.

“I didn’t cross any line,” Lucic said, per Rich Hammond of the O.C. Register. “Believe me, if my intentions were to hurt him, I would have hurt him.”

While Lucic knew he deserved a penalty, he said after the game that he didn’t “know why it was called a match penalty.” His coach, Darryl Sutter, agreed, calling it “a borderline even roughing penalty.”

And though former NHL referee Kerry Fraser believes a match penalty was indeed warranted, Lucic said this morning that he hasn’t heard from the NHL about any possible supplemental discipline.

Nor for that matter has Dustin Brown, after his high hit on Couture in the first period.

In conclusion, it’s good to have hockey back.

Related: Sutter says Kings weren’t ‘interested’ in checking the Sharks

Torres apologizes to Silfverberg and Sharks


A statement from Raffi Torres:

“I accept the 41-game suspension handed down to me by the NHL’s Department of Player Safety. I worked extremely hard over the last two years following reconstructive knee surgery to resume my NHL career, and this is the last thing I wanted to happen. I am disappointed I have put myself in a position to be suspended again. I sincerely apologize to Jakob for the hit that led to this suspension, and I’m extremely thankful that he wasn’t seriously injured as a result of the play. I also want to apologize to my Sharks teammates and the organization.”

A statement from San Jose GM Doug Wilson:

“The Sharks organization fully supports the NHL’s supplementary discipline decision regarding Raffi. While we do not believe there was any malicious intent, this type of hit is unacceptable and has no place in our game. There is a difference between playing hard and crossing the line and there is no doubt, in this instance, Raffi crossed that line. We’re very thankful that Jakob was not seriously injured as a result of this play.”

Silfverberg says he expects to play Saturday when the Ducks open their regular season Saturday in San Jose.