Report: Rangers, Nash are not interested in a trade

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The New York Rangers parted ways with one splashy-move-turned-struggling-playoff-performer this offseason by buying out Brad Richards, but the New York Post’s Larry Brooks reports that there’s no push to trade Rick Nash.

To be more precise, neither Nash nor the Rangers want to make a deal, according to Brooks:

But I’m here to tell you that a trade is not happening. Nash has a no-move clause in his contract in force through the end of this season that management has no intention of asking him to waive and No. 61 has no intention of volunteering to forfeit.

Indeed, Cap Geek notes that he has a no-movement clause through 2014-15 that softens to a no-trade clause from 2015-16 through the expiration of his $7.8 million cap hit in 2017-18.

Short-term fit

Considering the turnover the Rangers have experienced during this summer, it’s understandable why they would want to keep their most dangerous goal-scoring threat in the mix, even considering another miserable playoff run for the power forward.

Rather than any talk of “choking,” the Rangers might be more concerned with aging, however. Nash turned 30 on June 16, and it’s well-documented that the “Big 3-0” can be very unfriendly to scorers.

Nash’s 26 goals last season were nice – especially considering being limited to 65 regular season games – yet he actually generated more points (42 to 39) in the lockout-abbreviated 2012-13 campaign. He’s seen his point totals decline steadily since the 2008-09 season, although the Rangers would probably be OK with that if he can still be a threat to score 30 tallies (which he generally has been, despite missing that mark in two short seasons* with the Rangers).

What about next summer, though?

Long story short, the Rangers are justified in keeping him for this season, but would a trade down the line make sense if Nash was OK with it? Ignoring the prominent players who still need deals this offseason, just take a look at some of the players who are scheduled to be free agents as of this writing (cap hits in parenthesis):

Martin St. Louis ($5.625 million)
Derek Stepan ($3.075 million)
Carl Hagelin ($2.25 million)
Marc Staal ($3.975 million)

The fact that Stepan and Hagelin are RFA’s softens the blow a bit, but it’s conceivable that all of those players might want a raise. (Yes, St. Louis is aging, but he’s also been a nice bargain for most/all of his career and might seek a big payout to wrap up his NHL days …)

***

Nash has a hammer to swing even when he “only” has an NTC, yet that could be an interesting story to watch, especially if his season ends on a sour note once more. For now, though, it seems reasonable to believe that the power forward will stick in the Big Apple.

* The 2012-13 season throws off a lot of stats, doesn’t it?

Ducks prospect Jones seems ready to make the jump to the NHL

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The Anaheim Ducks had a chance to restock their prospect cupboard during the 2016 draft with a pair of first-round picks, selecting Max Jones with the No. 24 overall pick and Sam Steel with the No. 30 pick. Both prospects had strong seasons in 2016-17 with their junior teams — Steel recorded 131 points in 66 games with the Regina Pats of the Western Hockey League, while Jones was a point-per-game player for the OHL’s London Knights before getting his first taste of pro hockey with a nine-game look in the American Hockey League playoffs with the San Diego Gulls.

He now seems determined to make the Ducks’ roster this upcoming season.

Here is talking to Eric Stephens of the OC Register following the team’s prospect camp earlier this month.

“I don’t know if it’s about that,” Jones said at the Ducks’ prospect camp earlier this month. “I just think … I won a Memorial Cup. I think it’s time to move on and try to win a Stanley Cup. That’s kind of what my idea is.

“I want to step into the big leagues and I want to … for years and years I’ve been watching teams win that Stanley Cup and that’s all I want to do right now. Start playing and try to win a Stanley Cup.”

The problem Jones and the Ducks will face this season is that he is still not eligible to play in the American Hockey League during the regular season due to the CHL transfer agreement, which means the team has to decide whether or not to give him a look with the big club in Anaheim, or send him back to the Ontario Hockey League for a third consecutive season.

He also missed significant time this past season due to a broken arm and another suspension for crossing the line physically (this time it was 10 games for cross-checking), something he has struggled with during his junior hockey days.

Given his willingness to play the game with a physical edge and his size (6-3, 215 pounds) he certainly seems to fit the Ducks’ “heavy” style of play.

Still, the Ducks’ roster is already pretty deep and there aren’t many spots available, especially after the team just reached the Western Conference Finals this past season. For as big and talented as he is, he has still only played 112 games in the OHL over the past two seasons and hasn’t always dominated offensively. Some additional development time might not be the worst thing for him this season.

Penguins, Dumoulin seem pretty far apart with their arbitration numbers

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The Pittsburgh Penguins have two arbitration hearings scheduled with restricted free agents (Brian Dumoulin and Conor Sheary) over the next few weeks, and on Saturday we found out some of the numbers being thrown around for one of them.

Sportsnet’s Elliotte Friedman has the arbitration numbers for Dumoulin, with the defender asking for $4.35 million, while the team is offering $1.95 million.

Obviously, that is a pretty significant gap, and probably one of the larger ones you will see in these sorts of situations. But it is also important to keep in mind that at the end of the day this is still a negotiation and both sides know they’re probably not going to get what they are hoping for.

Dumoulin has to know he is not going to get $4.35 million, while the Penguins have to know they are probably going to have to pay more than $1.95 million to get him re-signed.

He is coming off of a contract that paid him $800,000 in each of the past two seasons.

The question is going to be how much each side has to give up.

What is going to work against Dumoulin is that he does not have the offensive numbers that are going to stand out and get him the sort of payday he asked for. His career high in points is 16 while he has scored just two goals in 163 regular season games during his career. He is a good defensive player and a solid top-four defenseman on a Stanley Cup winning team, but that lack of offensive production is going to hurt him in this sort of negotiation. Even if he were an unrestricted free agent on the open market he probably would not be able to get that sort of payday from a team. It seems impossible to think he would get that as an RFA in arbitration.

His arbitration hearing is scheduled for Monday, July 24.

Sheary is scheduled for his arbitration hearing on Aug. 4.

The Penguins are still $10.3 million under the salary cap (via CapFriendly). Dumoulin and Sheary figure to take up most of that, but they are also still in the market for a third-line center to replace Nick Bonino after he signed with the Nashville Predators in free agency.

Coyotes, Martinook avoid arbitration with two-year contract

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The Arizona Coyotes and restricted free agent forward Jordan Martinook were able to avoid their upcoming salary arbitration hearing by agreeing to terms on a two-year contract on Saturday.

Martinook’s new deal will pay him an average annual salary of $1.8 million per season according to Craig Morgan of 98.7 in Arizona and Sportsnet’s Elliotte Friedman.

“We are pleased to sign Jordan to a two-year contract,” general manager John Chayka said in a statement released by the team. “Jordan is a hard-working, versatile forward with good speed. He was an effective player for us last year and will play an important role for us this season.”
Martinook had an arbitration hearing scheduled for July 26 but this contract helps the two sides avoid that unpleasantness.

A second-round pick by the Coyotes in 2012, the 24-year-old forward has spent the past two full seasons playing for the Coyotes and is coming off of a 2016-17 season that saw him score a career-high 11 goals and 25 points. He mad $612,500 this past season, so the $1.8 million cap hit over the next two years represents a pretty significant raise for him. He bounced around the Coyotes’ lineup this past season, but he spent the majority of his time playing on a line alongside Tobias Rieder.

 

 

Tom Gilbert signs one-year contract to play in Germany

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After playing 11 seasons in the NHL veteran defenseman Tom Gilbert signed a one-year contract to play in Germany this upcoming season.

On Friday the Nuremberg Ice Tigers announced that Gilbert, 34, had signed with the team.

He spent the 2016-17 season with the Los Angeles Kings and Washington Capitals organizations, appearing in 18 games for the Kings and scoring one goal to go with four assists. He was traded to the Capitals during the season but never played a game for the team.

A fourth-round pick by the Colorado Avalanche in 2002, Gilbert has played 655 games in the NHL, scoring 45 goals and adding 178 assists while playing for the Edmonton Oilers, Minnesota Wild, Florida Panthers, Montreal Canadiens and Kings.

He will not be the only former NHLer playing for the Ice Tigers as the team already includes Steven Reinprecht, Milan Jurcina, and Colten Teubert.