2014 NHL Draft - Portraits

Bloodlines: 2014 Draft features familiar (last) names


As much as the 2014 NHL Draft (and everything surrounding it) was about change, seeing children of former players selected – sometimes by the same teams that employed their fathers – brought about a certain feeling of familiarity.

(And, in the case of Brendan Lemieux being more than OK with emulating his controversial dad Claude Lemieux, maybe the occasional foreboding sense.)

If a last name or 10 sounded familiar to you sometime between Friday night and Saturday afternoon, you weren’t hearing things. Consider some of the best “bloodlines” stories from the draft:

  • Eighth overall pick William Nylander might end up being the best offspring of them all. His father Michael isn’t that far removed from his playing days.
  • Another familiar name is Pittsburgh Penguins’ first-rounder (22nd overall) Kasperi Kapanen, Sami’s son.
  • The most charming moments probably came when players were selected for the same teams their fathers once skated for. That happened when the Montreal Canadiens picked Daniel Audette (you might remember his father Donald), the Boston Bruins selected Ryan Donato (son of Ted) and Carolina Hurricanes tabbed Josh Wesley (Glen’s progeny).
  • Josh Wesley is an especially cool story. He represents North Carolina’s homegrown NHL Draft selection. Will we see more from that region as the Hurricanes only get more settled in Raleigh?
  • Again, Brendan Lemieux hopes to bring the same clutch prowess and fury that his father Claude made infamous, even if it’s not with the Colorado Avalanche or New Jersey Devils (Buffalo made him the first pick of the second round). More about that father-son connection here.
  • The Los Angeles Kings nabbed Jake Marchment, son of Bryan … so Lemieux isn’t the only son of a controversial checker.
  • The Arizona Coyotes drafted Ryan MacInnis, son of Al.
  • The Detroit Red Wings drafted Dominic Turgeon with the 63rd pick. He looks remarkably like his father Pierre (insert uncomfortable Dale Hunter joke here).
source: Getty Images
Source: Getty Images
  • And, of course, there’s a Sutter. The New York Islanders drafted Lukas Sutter with the 200th pick. He’s Rich’s son.

Father-son connections aren’t the only noteworthy familial bits …

  • Shane Gersich (135th overall, Washington Capitals) has some famous uncles in Neal and Paul Broten. Neal had a great NHL career and was a key member of the fabled “Miracle on Ice” team.
  • If Anton Karlsson is anywhere near the player is brother Erik Karlsson is, the Arizona Coyotes could have a scary combination of offensive defensemen considering Oliver Ekman-Larsson and Keith Yandle’s talents. The Coyotes seemed to draft based on good genes, it seems.
  • John Quenneville is Chicago Blackhawks head coach Joel Quenneville’s second cousin. Coach Q must be glad that he’s in the Eastern Conference (selected 30th overall by the New Jersey Devils), as that will at least limit the awkward storylines.

Aside from maybe one of those first-round picks, it’s unlikely that fans will get many chances to compare and contrast these players with their relatives in NHL games during the 2014-15 season. Still, it’s often fun to see how far these hockey apples fall from the tree.

If the teams that drafted them get their way, the answer will be “not very far.”

Kings GM says Mike Richards went into ‘a destructive spiral’

Mike Richards

The Los Angeles Kings may owe Mike Richards money until 2031 (seriously), but in settling his grievance, the team and player more or less get to turn the page.

Not before Kings GM Dean Lombardi shares his sometimes startling perspective, though.

Lombardi has a tendency to be candid, especially in the press release-heavy world of sports management. Even by his standards, his account of Richards’ “destructive sprial” is a staggering read from the Los Angeles Times’ Lisa Dillman.

“Without a doubt, the realization of what happened to Mike Richards is the most traumatic episode of my career,” Lombardi said in a written summation he provided to the Los Angeles Times. “At times, I think that I will never recover from it. It is difficult to trust anyone right now – and you begin to question whether you can trust your own judgment. The only thing I can think of that would be worse would be suspecting your wife of cheating on you for five years and then finding out in fact it was true.”

Lombardi provides plenty of eyebrow-raising statements to Dillman, including:

  • He believed he “found his own Derek Jeter” in Richards, a player who “at one time symbolized everything that was special about the sport.”
  • Lombardi remarked that “his production dropped 50 percent and the certain ‘it’ factor he had was vaporizing in front of me daily.”
  • The Kings GM believes that he was “played” by Richards.

… Yeah.

Again, it’s a powerful read that you should soak in yourself, even if you’re unhappy with the way the Kings handled the situation.

Maybe the most pressing of many lingering questions is: will we get to hear Richards’ side of the story?

Coyotes exploit another lousy outing from Quick

Jonathan Quick

Despite owning two Stanley Cup rings, there are a healthy number of people who aren’t wild about Jonathan Quick.

Those people might feel validated through the Los Angeles Kings’ first two games, as he followed a rough loss to the San Jose Sharks with a true stinker against the Arizona Coyotes on Friday.

Sometimes a goalie has a bad night stats-wise, yet his team is as much to blame as anything else. You can probably pin this one on Quick, who allowed four goals on just 14 shots through the first two periods.

Things died down in the final frame, but let’s face it; slowing things down is absolutely the Coyotes’ design with a 4-1 lead (which ultimately resulted in a 4-1 win).


A soft 1-0 goal turned out to be a sign of things to come:

Many expected the Kings to roar into this second game after laying an egg in their opener. Instead, the Coyotes exploited Quick’s struggles for a confidence-booster, which included key prospect Max Domi scoring a goal and an assist.

It’s worth mentioning that Mike Smith looked downright fantastic at times, only drawing more attention to Quick’s struggles.


After a troubled summer and a failed 2014-15 season, Los Angeles was likely eager to start things off the right way.

Instead, they instead will likely focus on the fact that they merely dropped two (ugly) games.