Report: Campbell wants out of Florida


The closer we get to the draft, the more intriguing the Florida Panthers become.

The Panthers, already rumored to be shopping the first overall pick at the ’14 Draft, now reportedly have another potential move on their hands — defenseman Brian Campbell wants out, according to Fox Sports Midwest’s Andy Strickland.

Campbell, 35, has two years remaining on the massive eight-year, $57 million deal signed with Chicago in 2008. He carries an average annual cap hit of $7.14 million and, perhaps most importantly, holds an equal salary hit — Campbell didn’t sign one of those back-diving long-term deals the NHL has since penalized in the form of cap recapture.

If Strickland’s report of Campbell’s unhappiness in Florida is accurate, it won’t be entirely surprising. Campbell didn’t have Florida on his list of eight teams upon being traded from Chicago in 2011 (he had a modified no-trade clause) and Panthers GM Dale Tallon had to persuade Campbell to waive his NTC to come to Florida.

Here was Tallon’s sales pitch, per the Chicago Tribune. See any issues with it?

“We talked a couple of times,” said Tallon, who was the Hawks’ GM in 2008 when he signed Campbell to an eight-year, $56.8 million contract. “I explained the plan and the blueprint. It’s similar to what we did in Chicago. He was able to convince his family and fiance that this is the right move for him and I think it is. It was a great conversation with a guy who loves to play hockey. It was a tough decision for him.”

In Campbell’s contract, there are eight teams to which he can be traded without his permission but the Panthers weren’t on the list. In the end, Tallon’s pitch was enough for him to OK the move with the Hawks getting winger Rostislav Olesz in return.

“I was pretty quiet (Friday), mulling it over, thinking of all the positives and negatives of the situation,'” Campbell told the South Florida Sun Sentinel. “Dale did some great things in Chicago for a lot of guys and I’ve talked to a lot of my ex-teammates who are saying to me, ‘Get me there.’

“Dale will make this place very attractive for players. We’ll get this organization going in the right direction and make the fans want to come back to support a great team.”

Since that time, the Panthers have gone 82-98-32, made the playoffs just once and are now on the verge of hiring their third head coach after dismissing both Kevin Dineen and Peter Horachek.

Campbell, meanwhile, has seen his reputation take a hit by playing big minutes on a bad team. He’s minus-37 since joining the Panthers, prompting L.A. head coach Darryl Sutter to say the following:

As long as [Drew] Doughty is taking care of business in his own end and making a good first pass, Sutter will be happy.

The last thing the coach wants to see is Doughty trying to do it all himself.

“Well, if you do that all the time, you’re not a very good player,” said Sutter, per LA Kings Insider. “You’re Brian Campbell in Florida. You’ll be minus-20. And we’ll see you on the highlights, but you’re on a bad team, and you’re a high-minus player.”

Should Campbell be made available via trade, he’ll be an interesting candidate. Though the cap hit is high, he’s still a quality point producer and excellent puck-mover, something the Oilers — who have nearly $26 million in cap space — are reportedly interested in acquiring.

Kings GM says Mike Richards went into ‘a destructive spiral’

Mike Richards

The Los Angeles Kings may owe Mike Richards money until 2031 (seriously), but in settling his grievance, the team and player more or less get to turn the page.

Not before Kings GM Dean Lombardi shares his sometimes startling perspective, though.

Lombardi has a tendency to be candid, especially in the press release-heavy world of sports management. Even by his standards, his account of Richards’ “destructive sprial” is a staggering read from the Los Angeles Times’ Lisa Dillman.

“Without a doubt, the realization of what happened to Mike Richards is the most traumatic episode of my career,” Lombardi said in a written summation he provided to the Los Angeles Times. “At times, I think that I will never recover from it. It is difficult to trust anyone right now – and you begin to question whether you can trust your own judgment. The only thing I can think of that would be worse would be suspecting your wife of cheating on you for five years and then finding out in fact it was true.”

Lombardi provides plenty of eyebrow-raising statements to Dillman, including:

  • He believed he “found his own Derek Jeter” in Richards, a player who “at one time symbolized everything that was special about the sport.”
  • Lombardi remarked that “his production dropped 50 percent and the certain ‘it’ factor he had was vaporizing in front of me daily.”
  • The Kings GM believes that he was “played” by Richards.

… Yeah.

Again, it’s a powerful read that you should soak in yourself, even if you’re unhappy with the way the Kings handled the situation.

Maybe the most pressing of many lingering questions is: will we get to hear Richards’ side of the story?

Coyotes exploit another lousy outing from Quick

Jonathan Quick
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Despite owning two Stanley Cup rings, there are a healthy number of people who aren’t wild about Jonathan Quick.

Those people might feel validated through the Los Angeles Kings’ first two games, as he followed a rough loss to the San Jose Sharks with a true stinker against the Arizona Coyotes on Friday.

Sometimes a goalie has a bad night stats-wise, yet his team is as much to blame as anything else. You can probably pin this one on Quick, who allowed four goals on just 14 shots through the first two periods.

Things died down in the final frame, but let’s face it; slowing things down is absolutely the Coyotes’ design with a 4-1 lead (which ultimately resulted in a 4-1 win).


A soft 1-0 goal turned out to be a sign of things to come:

Many expected the Kings to roar into this second game after laying an egg in their opener. Instead, the Coyotes exploited Quick’s struggles for a confidence-booster, which included key prospect Max Domi scoring a goal and an assist.

It’s worth mentioning that Mike Smith looked downright fantastic at times, only drawing more attention to Quick’s struggles.


After a troubled summer and a failed 2014-15 season, Los Angeles was likely eager to start things off the right way.

Instead, they instead will likely focus on the fact that they merely dropped two (ugly) games.