2014 NHL Stanley Cup Final - Game Two

Kings haven’t paid for mistakes…yet


LOS ANGELES — It’s true that hockey is a game of mistakes. But this is getting ridiculous.

Just two games into the 2014 Stanley Cup Final and the list of costly, glaring blunders is already a lengthy one, on both sides.

In Game 1, Drew Doughty and Dan Girardi each had gaffes that led to goals for the New York Rangers and Los Angeles Kings, respectively.

In Game 2 – a contest that was played after a two-day break that was supposed to provide a refreshing respite for tired participants – Justin Williams had a turnover that led to a goal, and so did Brad Richards. Matt Greene made a couple of goofs that led to goals. Jonathan Quick and Willie Mitchell had a mix-up that led to a goal. There was a too many men penalty on the Kings, which led to a goal. Oh, and Ryan McDonagh tried to stick-handle when he shouldn’t have. Which led to a goal.

At least the overtime winner, a clever tip by L.A. captain Dustin Brown, was devoid of glaring error.

“You don’t want to do it, but it happens,” Kings forward Anze Kopitar said of all the mistakes. “They have some speedy guys that create turnovers. That’s just what’s going to happen sometimes. It is what it is.”

“Quite honestly, we’re not happy with how we’ve started these two games,” said Mitchell. “At all. It’s the Stanley Cup finals and you know everyone in this room cares. So much. But we haven’t executed, we haven’t executed well in the first half of games. It baffles everyone in here. It’s not a place we want to be in to have to climb out of all the time. Sooner or later it’s going to bite you in the ass.”

“Right now we’re doing a lot of things that aren’t in our game, haven’t been in our game for years here,” said Jarret Stoll. “We’re getting away with it I think right now. … It’s a game of mistakes. We made some mistakes on those goals, they’re in our net. You’re not going to blame your goalie. They made some mistakes that made it into their net. I’m sure that’s what they’ll say.”

“We still have huge room for improvement,” said Williams. “We can only get better. That’s the positive that we need to get out of this.”

The Kings could take solace that both games ended with L.A. victories, putting them just two wins away from their second championship in three years, despite the aforementioned poor starts in both Games 1 and 2.

The Rangers, meanwhile, were once again left to wonder what could have been. In Game 2, they had a 2-0 lead. And a 3-1 lead. And a 4-2 lead. All for naught.

“We blew another two-goal lead,” said New York’s Chris Kreider. “We lost in overtime. I had two Grade-A opportunities and didn’t finish, so I have to execute better.”

“They’ve been in three Game 7’s and come out on top,” said Girardi. “[The Kings] were Stanley Cup champions a couple years ago. They know what it takes to win. They’re getting those good bounces, those good plays in front.

“We’re just going to have to find a way to, when we have the lead, to hold on to it, especially against a team like this. We know they’re going to be coming. They have all that experience over there and we need to be ready for that.”

The good news for the Rangers is they haven’t lost at home yet. And if we’ve learned one thing from these playoffs, it’s that momentum can shift in a series, no matter how in control one team seems and how devastated everyone thinks the other should be.

Game 3 goes Monday at Madison Square Garden, where the Rangers will be hoping for a lift from the home crowd.

“I think we’ve played close to nine periods now,” said coach Alain Vigneault. “For the most part I’ve liked a lot of things about our game. Our guys are trying real hard. We’re going to continue to try. I mean, both games we had opportunities. We didn’t get it done.

“We’re going home in front of our great fans. We’re going to be ready for the next game.”

And if there’s one coach who should know about 2-0 leads in the Cup final, it’s Vigneault, whose former Vancouver side looked in control of the 2011 final after two wins at home, before the Bruins stormed back to win four of five, starting with a blowout victory in Boston in Game 3.

History, of course, says teams that lose the first two games of the final on the road are in big trouble. The all-time record of those teams is 3-32.

Related: Kings know they got away with one

Report: Islanders cut first-rounder Barzal from camp

Mathew Barzal
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It seems Mathew Barzal has played in his last game in a New York Islanders’ uniform for a little while.

Barzal took part in the Islanders’ preseason finale against the Washington Capitals on Sunday, but after that contest the Islanders decided to return him to WHL Seattle, per Newsday’s Arthur Staple.

He was taken with the 16th overall pick in 2015 NHL Entry Draft. That selection was well-traveled as it originally belonged to the Pittsburgh Penguins, but was involved in the David Perron trade and then moved to the Islanders as part of Edmonton’s deal to get Griffin Reinhart.

Barzal is noteworthy for his skill and speed, but he may have slipped in the draft due to a knee injury he sustained during the 2014-15 campaign.

The Islanders also reassigned Kirill Petrov, Kevin Czuczman, Scott Mayfield, and Adam Pelech to the AHL’s Bridgeport Sound Tigers.

Torres offered in-person hearing, potentially setting up long suspension

Torres hit

What will Raffi Torres get this time?

The 33-year-old forward that has become known primarily for his controversial hits has once again put himself in the sights of the NHL’s Department of Players Safety. They confirmed that he was offered an in-person hearing following his hit on Jakub Silfverberg Saturday night. He declined the opportunity to meet with them face-to-face, but the offer itself is an important detail because it gives the league the option to suspend him for more than five games.

It certainly seems like the stage is set for a lengthy suspension. While Torres is not considered a repeat offender as his last suspension came more than 18 months ago, the NHL still retains the right to consider his history when deciding on this matter.

Among other incidents, he was once was banned from 25 games for his hit on Marian Hossa in 2012, although it was later reduced to 21 contests after an appeal. The NHL found that Torres was guilty of breaking three rules for that hit; namely interference, charging, and illegally hitting the head. The NHL is reviewing Torres’ latest incident for the same three violations.

You can see the hit below:

And here it is slowed down:

Torres got a match penalty and Silfverberg left the game. Fortunately, Ducks coach Bruce Boudreau said that Silfverberg could have returned, but was kept out for precautionary reasons.