Get your game notes: Rangers at Kings

3 Comments

Tonight on NBC, it’s the Los Angeles Kings hosting the New York Rangers at 7 p.m. ET in the second game of the 2014 Stanley Cup Final. Following are some game notes, as compiled by the NHL on NBC research team:

• Game 1 of the Stanley Cup Final went to overtime for the third straight year, the first time that has happened in NHL history. The current Game 2 OT streak is also three games (See table). Prior to 2011, the last time that either Game 1 or 2 went to OT was 2002 (all 16 games between Game 2 in 2002 and Game 1 in 2011 were decided in regulation). If another game this series goes to OT, it will mark only the second time in NHL history that multiple Cup Final games go to OT in three consecutive years (2002-04).

Results of Games 1 and 2, Stanley Cup Final, 2011-14
Year | Finalists | Game 1 | Game 2 | Series winner

2011 Boston-Vancouver at VAN, 1-0 at VAN, 3-2 (OT) Bruins in 7
2012 Los Angeles-New Jersey LA, 2-1 (OT) LA, 2-1 (OT) Kings in 6
2013 Boston-Chicago at CHI, 4-3 (3OT) BOS, 2-1 (OT) Blackhawks in 6
2014 N.Y. Rangers-Los Angeles at LA, 3-2 (OT) TBD TBD

• Kings goaltender Jonathan Quick, who stopped the last 15 Rangers shots in Game 1 and raised his career Stanley Cup Final OT record to 3-0, has allowed two or fewer goals in all seven of his Cup Final starts (2012 and 2014). That ties an NHL record for most Cup Final starts allowing two or fewer goals to begin a career. Hockey Hall of Famer Alec Connell started four games for the Ottawa Senators in 1927, and three games for the Montreal Maroons in 1935. Elias Sports Bureau

• With an assist on Drew Doughty’s game-tying goal and, later, his first-career playoff OT goal, Kings winger Justin Williams set personal single-postseason highs in goals (eight), assists (12) and points (20) and moved into a tie with Patrick Kane (CHI) for third among all players in points this postseason, behind teammates Anze Kopitar (24) and Jeff Carter (23). He is also tied with Carter and Ryan Getzlaf (ANA) for most games this postseason with at least one goal and one assist (four).

• In Game 1, the Kings outshot the Rangers 20-3 in the third period. Since NHL expansion in 1967-68, the Kings’ shots on goal advantage (+17) was the largest differential of any Stanley Cup Final period, and Rangers goaltender Henrik Lundqvist’s 20 saves were the most by a goalie during that span. It was the fifth time a team has registered 20+ shots on goal in a Cup Final period, but the first time that that team did not score; all five of those teams won the games. Elias Sports Bureau

Most shots on goal in one period by a team in Stanley Cup Final, Expansion Era (1967-68)
SOG Team (Opponent) | Year | Game | Period | Opposing goalie (saves)

21 Islanders (vs. PHI) 1980 Game 3, 2nd Phil Myre (19 saves)
20 Oilers (vs. PHI) 1985 Game 3, 1st Pelle Lindbergh/Bob Froese (17 saves)
20 Kings (at MTL) 1993 Game 1, 2nd Patrick Roy (19 saves)
20 Red Wings (vs. WSH) 1998 Game 2, 3rd Olaf Kolzig (17 saves)
20 Kings (vs. NYR) 2014 Game 1, 3rd Lundqvist (20 saves)

• Rangers defenseman Ryan McDonagh, who assisted on Carl Hagelin’s second shorthanded goal of the playoffs to take the team lead in scoring (3-11—14), led all players in ice time (31:12) and shorthanded TOI (5:28), and was second in even-strength TOI (21:29; Dan Girardi – 21:42) and third in power-play TOI (4:15; Brad Richards – 4:25, Drew Doughty – 4:21). Doughty broke his own Kings franchise record (from 2012) for points by a defenseman in one playoff year (5-12—17).

• The Kings, who scored three or more goals in half (41) of their games this regular season (T-11th-fewest in NHL) have now scored 3+ goals in seven straight games (and 17 of 22 games overall) this postseason. The last team to score 3+ in eight or more consecutive playoff games was the 2009 Penguins (10).

• Since the Stanley Cup Final went to seven games in 1939, a team has taken a 2-0 series lead in 48 of 74 series (65%), most recently Los Angeles in 2012, while 26 of 74 (35%) have featured splits. Of the 48 teams that swept Games 1 and 2, 43 (90%) went on the win the Cup.

Turn it up to 11? Pens, Caps have a lot to live up to

Getty Images
Leave a comment

by WILL GRAVES (AP Sports Writer)

PITTSBURGH (AP) — Sidney Crosby doesn’t think the Pittsburgh Penguins have some sort of mystical edge over the Washington Capitals. That all those series and all those years and all that dominance will not mean a thing when the two longtime rivals meet in the playoffs for the 11th time starting Thursday night in the Eastern Conference semifinals.

Of course, it’s kind of easy to say that when you’re on the side that always wins.

Eras change. Stars change. Coaches change. Styles change (well, sort of). The result when the Penguins are on one bench and the Capitals are on the other and a spot in the next round in the pursuit of a Stanley Cup is on the line does not. The Penguins have won nine of the 10 previous meetings.

Epic collapses. Unlikely comebacks. Wild finishes. Emotional scar tissue from losses that come from being the hockey equivalent of Sisyphus. Hall of Famers (and future Hall of Famers) all over the place — particularly if you wear black-and-gold.

Crosby, Alex Ovechkin and company have a lot to live up to. But before we throw ourselves into the physical and psychological maw for two weeks, let’s press our finger on the bruises – or relive the joy, depending on your point of view – of the magic and misery that came before and almost certainly is to come.

[NBC’s Stanley Cup Playoff Hub]

THE YEAR: 1991

THE ROUND: Patrick Division Finals

THE RESULT: Penguins in 5.

THE DEFINING MOMENT: The Capitals scored three times in the first 10:26 of the third period of Game 2 in Pittsburgh to take the lead. Randy Gilhen – he of the three career playoff goals – jumped onto the ice during a delayed Washington penalty and emerged from a sea of bodies to tie it with less than 5 minutes left in regulation. Kevin Stevens won it with a wrist shot off a pretty setup by Ron Francis 8:10 into overtime to even the series. The Capitals scored three goals total the rest of the way as the Penguins advanced to the conference finals for the first time in franchise history.

GUT PUNCH LEVEL: 2. The massively talented Penguins had seven Hall of Famers on the roster (eight if you include the ageless and sure-to-be inducted Jaromir Jagr) and won their first Cup two rounds later.

THE YEAR: 1992

THE ROUND: Patrick Division Semifinals

THE SERIES: Penguins in 7.

THE DEFINING MOMENT: The Capitals sprinted to a 3-1 series lead. After getting drilled at home in Game 5, Washington led 4-2 4 minutes into the second period of Game 6. And then Mario Lemieux happened . Super Mario scored or assisted on three power-play goals over the final 30 minutes as the Penguins tied the series, then shut the Caps down in Game 7, a 3-1 win on the road to propel them to a second straight Cup.

GUT PUNCH LEVEL: 8. Pittsburgh had a bit of a Cup hangover after winning it all in ’91 and appeared on the verge of collapse after the Capitals crushed them 7-2 in Game 4. And then … well, consider this the start of a trend.

THE YEAR: 1994

THE ROUND: Eastern Conference quarterfinals.

THE SERIES: Capitals in 6.

THE DEFINING MOMENT: Washington again jumped out to a 3-1 series lead only to lose Game 5 at home. Back in Pittsburgh for Game 6, the Capitals went up 3-0 only to have the Penguins cut it to 3-2 after the first period. Momentum teetering, Washington defenseman Calle Johansson beat Tom Barrasso 1:25 into the second to restore the Caps’ two-goal lead and Washington closed out Pittsburgh for the first – and only – time.

GUT PUNCH LEVEL: 6. Pittsburgh viewed 1994 as a redemption tour after its bid for a three-peat was derailed by the Islanders in the 1993 playoffs. The Penguins won the Northeast Division and had the third-best record in the league only to lose to a Capitals team that started the season 0-6 and fired coach Terry Murray at midseason and replaced him with Jim Schoenfeld.

THE YEAR: 1995

THE ROUND: Eastern Conference quarterfinals.

THE SERIES: Penguins in 7.

THE DEFINING MOMENT: Lemieux sat out the lockout shortened 1994-95 season due to fatigue and the Capitals took advantage in the playoffs. Washington – stop us if you’ve heard this before – headed to Pittsburgh with a 3-1 lead and jumped ahead four separate times in front of a stunned crowd at the Igloo. Kevin Stevens, however, drew the Penguins even with 8:18 left in regulation and Luc Robitaille kept Pittsburgh’s season alive with his OT winner 4:30 into the first extra period to give the Penguins a 6-5 victory. Pittsburgh went on to win Games 6 and 7 by a combined 10-1.

GUT PUNCH LEVEL: 9. For a franchise that didn’t exactly have a reputation for answering when pushed, Washington’s remarkable play in Game 5 went against the grain and they didn’t have to worry about Lemieux. And yet …

THE YEAR: 1996

THE ROUND: Eastern Conference quarterfinals.

THE SERIES: Penguins in 7.

THE DEFINING MOMENT: Make it defining moments. All of them seeming to come in an epic Game 4 . The Capitals led 2-1 and didn’t have to contend with Lemieux after he was ejected late in the second period for fighting Washington’s Pat Peake. Regulation ended tied at 2. So did the first overtime. And the second (after Washington’s Joe Juneau couldn’t convert the first overtime penalty shot in NHL history ). And the third. With 45 seconds left in the fourth extra period, Petr Nedved threw a shot in from outside the left circle that slipped by Olaf Kolzig and into the net to tie the series. Pittsburgh captured the next two to advance to the conference finals.

GUT PUNCH LEVEL: They might not have invented the number yet to rate the emotional toll of this one. Say ”Nedved” around Caps’ fans at your own risk.

THE YEAR: 2000

THE ROUND: Eastern Conference quarterfinals.

THE SERIES: Penguins in 5.

THE DEFINING MOMENT: Washington lost 7-0 in Game 1 but had a chance to even the series when Game 2 went to overtime. Jaromir Jagr, however, effectively ended the competitive portion of things with a power-play goal 5:49 into overtime as the Penguins – who finished a middling third in the Atlantic Division – knocked off the Southeast Division champions with relative ease.

GUT PUNCH LEVEL: 3. Washington’s record was a bit of a mirage in a division that included the teams (Atlanta and Tampa Bay) that finished with the two worst records in the NHL.

THE YEAR: 2001

THE ROUND: Eastern Conference quarterfinals.

THE SERIES: Penguins in 6.

THE DEFINING MOMENT: The last great stand of the Lemieux-Jagr partnership. Super Mario scored the game-winning goals in both Game 2 and Game 5 and Martin Straka’s OT winner finished off the Capitals in six games. Washington was built on coach Ron Wilson’s defensive style but the Penguins – as they almost always did – found a way to squeak by anyway. Pittsburgh allowed just 10 goals in six games.

GUT PUNCH LEVEL: 4. At this point, the rivalry had gotten to the point where the Capitals appeared to be waiting for the other shoe to drop.

THE YEAR: 2009

THE ROUND: Eastern Conference semifinals.

THE SERIES: Penguins in 7.

THE DEFINING MOMENT: Let’s just go with the whole thing. The NHL pulled itself out of the 2004-05 lockout largely on the back of Crosby and Ovechkin. Meeting in the playoffs for the first time, they somehow exceeded massive expectations. They put up matching hat tricks in Washington’s Game 2 win. The Penguins responded by ripping off three straight only to have Washington force a Game 7 with an overtime victory in Pittsburgh in Game 6 (helped by three Ovechkin assists). Was this ”The Year”? SPOILER ALERT: No. At home in Game 7, the Capitals collapsed. Crosby opened the scoring, the Penguins were up by four just 2:12 into the second and that was it.

GUT PUNCH LEVEL: 7.5. It probably should be higher because of Washington’s very un-Capslike rally in Game 6 on the road but the Penguins were coming off a season in which they were a Stanley Cup runner-up and just proved to be more mature when it mattered.

THE YEAR: 2016

THE ROUND: Eastern Conference semifinals

THE SERIES: Penguins in 6.

THE DEFINING MOMENT: Pittsburgh was in a malaise in December and fired coach Mike Johnston in favor of Mike Sullivan. General manager Jim Rutherford overhauled the roster to one built on speed and depth. All three goal scorers in Pittsburgh’s clinching Game 6 win – Phil Kessel, Carl Hagelin and Nick Bonino – were brought in by Rutherford to ramp up the team’s quickness. Together they formed the ”HBK” line and Bonino’s jam into the net 6:32 into overtime showcased the depth the Penguins needed to take some of the pressure off Crosby and Evgeni Malkin.

GUT PUNCH LEVEL: 9. The Capitals captured the Presidents’ Trophy by posting 120 points, 11 more than the next best team. They had home ice and a Vezina Trophy-winning goaltender in Braden Holtby, who lost in regulation only nine times during the regular season. Still, Holtby was outplayed – just a tad – by 21-year-old rookie Matt Murray.

THE YEAR: 2017

THE ROUND: Eastern Conference semifinals.

THE SERIES: Penguins in 7.

THE DEFINING MOMENT: Maybe Matt Niskanen‘s controversial shot to Crosby’s head in Game 3 that forced Crosby to miss Game 4? Washington’s comeback from a 3-1 deficit to force Game 7? Let’s go with Penguins goaltender Marc-Andre Fleury. The winningest netminder in franchise history had lost his job to Murray over the course of the season but was pressed into action when Murray was injured before Game 1 of Pittsburgh’s opening-round series against Columbus. Fleury was brilliant, no more so than in Game 7 against the Caps. He stopped 29 shots for his ninth career playoff shutout, including a save on an Ovechkin one-timer with the butt end of his stick late in the second period to preserve a one-goal lead.

GUT PUNCH LEVEL: 6. Why 6? Call it the emotional calluses of disappointment. If this loss was to say, the New York Rangers, it may have been more traumatic. But this is what happens when the Capitals play the Penguins.

More NHL hockey: https://apnews.com/tag/NHLhockey

PHT Morning Skate: Provorov played with AC separation; Time for Wild to rebuild

1 Comment
Welcome to the PHT Morning Skate, a collection of links from around the hockey world. Have a link you want to submit? Email us at phtblog@nbcsports.com.

• Up top, check out the highlights from Game 7 between the Boston Bruins and Toronto Maple Leafs.

• Even though the Capitals and Penguins have had similar regular-season success since the start of the Crosby/Ovechkin era, there’s still a glaring difference when it comes to playoff results. The Caps are hoping this time will be different. (Sports Illustrated)

• A three-peat won’t be easy for the Penguins, but it isn’t supposed to be easy. There’s a reason why the Stanley Cup Playoffs are considered to be the most difficult grind in professional sports. (Pensblog)

Marc-Andre Fleury is one of the big reasons why the Golden Knights are through to the second round of the playoffs. He plays with a chip on his shoulder, but he certainly doesn’t act like he has one. (SB Nation)

• The San Jose Sharks have an incredible power play, the Vegas Golden Knights have an incredibly penalty kill. Which special teams unit will come out on top in Round 2? (NBC Sports Bay Area)

• Instead of smashing a car before their second-round series the Winnipeg Jets, Predators fans will smash a small plane instead. (NHL.com)

• Canadiens forward Andrew Shaw underwent knee surgery on Wednesday. He’s expected to miss at least six months of action. (NHL.com/Canadiens)

Ivan Provorov played in Game 6 against Pittsburgh with a grade 3 AC separation. “It was really frustrating going down in the third period, where I was starting to lose the feeling in my arm. I lost the puck a bunch of times and turned it over. As a competitor, it’s hard not to be out there and not try to do everything to help the team win.” (NBC Sports Philly)

• The Columbus Blue Jackets did some things well and other things not so well during their first-round series against the Washington Capitals. They managed to grab early leads and their stars produced, but they also took too many penalties and their goalie wasn’t good enough. (Jackets Cannon)

• The Colorado Avalanche had a positive season, but they still have a lot to do this offseason. Joe Sakic can start by signing Mikko Rantanen to an extension. (Mile High Hockey)

• New Jersey surprised many by making it to the postseason this year, but they’ll have to show that they can perform now that other teams see them coming. (All About the Jersey)

• The Flames will have to hope that new head coach Bill Peters is able to relate to his players better than the team’s previous coaches. (Flames Nation)

• Regardless of who the Minnesota Wild hire to be their next GM, they should probably look at rebuilding. (Featurd)

• The Hockey Hall of Fame will display items used by First Nations women’s hockey star Bev Beaver. She played competitive hockey for four decades. (Color of Hockey)

• Why will the Capitals get the job done this time around? DC Puck Drop explains why. (DC Puck Drop)

Joey Alfieri is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @joeyalfieri.

Bruins will way to Game 7 win against Maple Leafs

25 Comments

Once again, the Boston Bruins finished a Game 7 against the Toronto Maple Leafs, riding an overpowering third period. In the case of Wednesday’s game, the end result was a 7-4 win for the Bruins.

The 2018 edition featured some similarities to the Bruins’ 5-4 win back in 2013.

  • A Maple Leafs team headed for the summer shaking their heads and with some serious soul-searching to do.
  • The heartache that comes with the Leafs giving up leads. Toronto was up 1-0, 2-1, and 4-3. This wasn’t a collapse of the “It was 4-1” variety, but the Maple Leafs squandered multiple leads nonetheless.

  • The Bruins simply ran away with things in the third period. Boston went from being down 4-3 to winning 7-4. That domination included the Bruins keeping the Maple Leafs from registering a shot on goal through the first eight minutes of the final frame.

In the case of this latest Game 7, there were times when it seemed like the last shot on goal might be the winner.

[NBC’s Stanley Cup Playoff Hub]

Really, it was a nightmare game for both goalies. Frederik Andersen‘s Game 7 heartache is no longer limited to his time with the Anaheim Ducks, as he gave up six goals, including a few that are likely to haunt him during the off-season. The Lightning must be licking their chops at the prospect of exploiting what might be a fragile goalie in Tuukka Rask; the Bruins ended up on top in this one, yet Rask gave up four goals on 24 shots.

(Maybe a solid finish will help bolster his self-esteem? Rask stopped all eight Maple Leafs SOG in the third period after giving up those four goals on the first 18 shots he faced.)

If you want to summarize Game 7 in one video clip, Jake DeBrusk‘s second goal of the night (and eventual game-winner) could suffice. The Bruins simply demanded this win, showing off their skill and will while flabbergasting the overmatched Maple Leafs and a struggling Andersen:

Several players came up big on each side. DeBrusk scored those two goals and was quite the presence overall. Charlie McAvoy logged 26:43 of ice time with a +1 rating, while a blocked shot apparently didn’t really throw off Zdeno Chara, who managed a +2 rating and 28:38 TOI. Despite some warranted criticisms, David Krejci did manage to generate three assists, adding to a substantial playoff resume for his career. Patrick Marleau provided more than just a “veteran presence” for the Maple Leafs, scoring two goals during a zany first period.

Still, when it comes to the Maple Leafs, many will linger on those who fell short.

Andersen’s struggles were considerable, rounding out a remarkably hot-and-cold series overall. Auston Matthews failed to score a point despite firing four SOG, finishing the series with just a single goal and single assist. Jake Gardiner had an awful Game 7, suffering a -5 rating and absorbing some of the blame for multiple bad moments.

Sportsnet’s Chris Johnston reports that Gardiner said “most” of the loss was on him and that the defenseman had tears in his eyes while asking questions.

“I didn’t show up,” Gardiner said.

The Bruins eliminated the Maple Leafs in an exhilarating fashion, carrying over an impressive regular season of puck-hogging play. They have plenty of room for improvement, something Jack Adams finalist Bruce Cassidy will surely emphasize as they turn their sights to a rested, versatile opponent in the Lightning.

If it’s anything like Bruins – Leafs, it should be thrilling … and maybe a goalie’s nightmare.

James O’Brien is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @cyclelikesedins.

NHL Stanley Cup Playoffs: Second round schedule, TV info

Getty Images
Leave a comment

The second round of the 2018 Stanley Cup Playoffs is now set, thanks to the Boston Bruins winning Game 7 over the Toronto Maple Leafs, 7-4. The Bruins will move on to face the Tampa Bay Lightning, while the Pittsburgh Penguins will meet the Washington Capitals to complete the Eastern Conference bracket. Out West, the Nashville Predators and Winnipeg Jets will battle out of the Central Division and the Vegas Golden Knights take on the San Jose Sharks.

[NBC’s Stanley Cup Playoff Hub]

Here’s the full second round schedule, which kicks off with two games on Thursday night:

* if necessary
TBD – To Be Determined

————

Sean Leahy is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @Sean_Leahy.