Captain clutch: Brown scores OT winner, Kings take Game 2


LOS ANGELES — When the Kings needed someone to step up, the captain answered the call.

Dustin Brown scored the winner 10:26 into the second overtime on Saturday night, tipping home a Willie Mitchell point shot to give the Kings a 5-4 win over the New York Rangers and two games to none lead in the Stanley Cup Final.

For Brown, the goal capped off one of his most emphatic performances of the postseason. He led all Kings forwards with six hits and finished with over 26 minutes of ice time, his highest total of the playoffs. The goal occurred during the second straight OT game played between the Rangers and Kings; it also marked the first time in NHL history that three consecutive Stanley Cup Finals opened with a pair of overtime games (L.A. and New Jersey went to extra time twice in 2012; the Bruins and ‘Hawks did it last year as well.)

Tonight’s game had plenty more to offer than just Brown’s OT heroics, however. Like in Game 1, both Los Angeles and New York engaged in an entertaining opening 60 minutes that featured a number of scoring chances.

And just like in Game 1, the Rangers couldn’t hold onto a two-goal lead.

Check that — the Rangers couldn’t hold onto three two-goal leads.

New York raced out to its first in the opening period — Ryan McDonagh opened the scoring at the 10:48 mark, and Mats Zuccarello made it 2-0 eight minutes later when he scored his fifth of the playoffs.

In the second period, L.A. wasted little time erasing the deficit.

The Kings cut the lead to one just 1:46 in, when Jarret Stoll capitalized on a bad Brad Richards turnover and some sloppy defensive zone work from New York. Ten minutes later, the Rangers restored their two-goal advantage when Martin St. Louis scored on his power play — the first Blueshirts goal with the man advantage this series — but the Kings replied almost immediately when Willie Mitchell scored his team’s first power play goal of the Stanley Cup Final at the 14:39 mark.

Eleven seconds after Mitchell scored, the Rangers took advantage of some poor Jonathan Quick puck handling (Mitchell’s wasn’t great either). Derick Brassard scored, giving New York a 4-2 lead they’d carry into the third period.

Down a pair of goals — and stop us if you’ve heard this one before — the Kings found a way to claw back.

It began with the most questionable and controversial goal of the series, as Dwight King appeared to interfere with Henrik Lundqvist while tipping home Matt Greene’s point shot. Lundqvist was livid following the goal, protesting that King was camped out in his crease; adding to the frustration was that, earlier in the game, the Rangers were whistled on a goalie interference penalty when Benoit Pouliot tangled with Jonathan Quick.

Kings’s goal stood, however, and that seemed to give L.A. the momentum it needed. Marian Gaborik snapped home his NHL-best 13th of the playoffs at the 7:36 mark, which capped the regulation scoring and sent the teams into overtime.

In the extra frames, both goalies performed well. Lundqvist stopped 11 of 12 shots to finish with 39 saves overall; Quick was perfect on all nine shots faced to finish with 34 saves on the night.

Looking ahead, it’ll be interesting to see how the Rangers respond to a second disappointing loss. They’ve now blown four two-goal leads in two games against the Kings and dropped a pair of OT defeats. For a team that will need to win at least one game at Staples to capture the Stanley Cup, those missed opportunities will loom large.

For the Kings…well, what more can be said? This team has shown remarkable resilience all postseason and did it again tonight, mounting a series of comebacks while looking completely unfazed by the prospect of falling behind. The Kings have proven to be a tough out all spring, and that’s continued through the first two games of the Stanley Cup Final.

Jason Demers tweets #FreeTorres, gets mocked

Los Angeles Kings v San Jose Sharks - Game One

Following his stunning 41-game suspension, it looks like Raffi Torres has at least one former teammate in his corner.

We haven’t yet seen how the San Jose Sharks or the NHLPA are reacting to the league’s hammer-dropping decision to punish Torres for his Torres-like hit on Jakob Silfverberg, but Jason Demers decided to put in a good word for Torres tonight.

It was a simple message: “#FreeTorres.”

Demers, now of the Dallas Stars, was once with Torres and the Sharks. (In case this post’s main image didn’t make that clear enough already.)

Perhaps this will become “a thing” at some point.

So far, it seems like it’s instead “a thing (that people are making fun of).”

… You get the idea.

The bottom line is that there are some who either a) blindly support Torres because they’re Sharks fans or b) simply think that the punishment was excessive.

The most important statement came from the Department of Player Safety, though.

Bruins list Chara on IR, for now

Zdeno Chara

Those who feel as though the Boston Bruins may rebound – John Tortorella, maybe? – likely rest some of their optimism on the back of a healthy Zdeno Chara.

It’s possible that he’s merely limping into what may otherwise be a healthy 2015-16 season, but it’s definitely looking like a slow start thanks to a lower-body injury.

The latest sign of a bumpy beginning came on Monday, as several onlookers (including’s Joe Haggerty) pointed out that Chara was listed on injured reserve.

As Haggerty notes, that move is retroactive to Sept. 24, so his status really just opens up options for the Bruins.

Still … it’s a little unsettling, isn’t it?

The Bruins likely realize that they need to transition away from their generational behemoth, but last season provided a stark suggestion that may not be ready yet. Trading Dougie Hamilton and losing Dennis Seidenberg to injury only make them more dependent on the towering 38-year-old.

This isn’t really something to panic about, yet it might leave a few extra seats open on the Bruins’ bandwagon.