Drew Doughty

Winning a double-edged sword for Doughty, who ‘for sure’ misses his anonymity


LOS ANGELES — Drew Doughty calls it “back in the day.” The time before the Los Angeles Kings had won their first Stanley Cup in franchise history. Before that magical 2012 run, during which they only lost four times on their way to the championship. Back when they were still nobodies in the vast American city better known for the Lakers, Dodgers, and Trojans.

He kind of misses those days.

“It’s changed drastically,” Doughty said. “I don’t know if I like it better or not. I for sure don’t like it better, actually. We’ll go out for dinner – the beards we all have don’t help – but back in the day we could just pretty much roll in anywhere, and there’s no way anyone would know who you were, no possible way. And now it seems like everywhere we do go, we are getting recognized.

“It’s kind of more like a Canada, when you’re back in home in Canada. It’s great because we’re bringing more fans to the game, we’re making hockey a presence in California. But that was kind of the bonus of playing here, too – you could do what you wanted and not get in trouble for it.”

The problem for Doughty is the Kings are back in the Cup final again in 2014, and they’re favored to beat the New York Rangers and claim another title.

“I’d rather have the problem and be a winner, than not have the problem and lose,” he said.

Because, for Doughty, winning is what drives him. Games, we mean. Not awards. Sure, he’d like to be recognized with a Norris Trophy sometime, but he’d rather put his name on the Cup a few more times.

“My ultimate thing is just winning,” he said. “That’s all I care about, being a winner and helping this team win. I’ll do anything it takes.”

Of course, there have been times in his still-young career when that competitiveness would “get the best of him,” according to Kings general manager Dean Lombardi.

And Doughty admits he still has his lapses.

For example, “Last game against the Blackhawks I wasn’t very good in the first period. I played a lot better after that, but I put maybe a little bit too much pressure on myself, tried to do too much on my own.”

And, “Sometimes I still snap and lose it on the refs, which I hate doing.”

But at just 24 years old, Doughty has already won a Stanley Cup and two Olympic gold medals, while his play at both ends of the ice has drawn comparisons to some of the all-time greats at the position.

“I think [Chris] Chelios was the best all-around defenseman that I had the opportunity to coach,” said L.A. bench boss Darryl Sutter. “So I’d say that Drew would be trending more towards that type of player in terms of the all-around part of it, in terms of the whole package part of it.”

Flyers want to prove doubters wrong

Jakub Voracek, Claude Giroux
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Jakub Voracek totally understands why nobody’s expecting much from the Philadelphia Flyers. When a team finishes 14 points out of the playoffs the year before, that’s typically going to be the case.

“We weren’t good enough last year, let’s face it,” Voracek told CSN Philly. 

So, no, it doesn’t upset him that the Flyers aren’t considered among the Stanley Cup favorites.

That being said, “it makes you feel you want to prove them wrong.”

The Flyers get going tonight with a tough game against the Lightning in Tampa Bay. They also play Saturday in Florida against the Panthers, before a rematch with the Panthers Monday in Philadelphia.

“My biggest concern would be getting off to a good start,” GM Ron Hextall said. “That’s one thing that we need to do.”

That’s something they didn’t do last year. In fact, they won just once in their first six games. By the end of November, they were 8-12-3 and in a big hole — one that proved too deep to climb out of.

Related: Flyers to start season with seven defensemen

Coyotes place towering enforcer John Scott on waivers

John Scott, Brandon Davidson
The Canadian Press via AP

The Arizona Coyotes might not be using John Scott‘s services after all.

The team waived him this afternoon, per Craig Morgan. It’s possible that the Coyotes are simply giving themselves options as Scott clearing would allow them to send him down quickly at any point until he plays in 10 games or 30 days pass. At the same time, any team looking for a gritty fourth-line forward or third-pairing defenseman might be tempted to claim him in light of his affordable $575K cap hit for the 2015-16 campaign.

Scott is an imposing presence on the ice at 6-foot-8 and 260 pounds, but he doesn’t bring much to the table other than his physical play and willingness to drop the gloves. In terms of offensive abilities, he’s among the least capable in the league. In fact, the four points he recorded last season with the San Jose Sharks represented a career-high for the 33-year-old.

Meanwhile, Dan Cleary went unclaimed on waivers, according to Bob McKenzie, setting the stage for him to be reassigned to the AHL’s Grand Rapids Griffins.