Peter Laviolette

With Laviolette gone, here’s the NHL’s coaching vacancy landscape


Considering how in-demand Peter Laviolette appeared to be prior to getting scooped up by Nashville — online oddsmaker Bovada had him as the 3-to-1 favorite to land the Washington gig, for example — it’s likely that his hire will shift the NHL’s coaching vacancy landscape.

As of today, there are openings in Vancouver, Washington, Florida and Carolina. Questions remain about Randy Carlyle’s future in Toronto and Todd McLellan’s in San Jose, so there could be as many as six potential jobs available — but, if Carlyle and McLellan hit the open market, that’s two more viable candidates added to the mix.

Speaking of that mix, names currently in it include Barry Trotz, John Stevens, Kevin Dineen, Jeff Blashill, Mike Haviland, Guy Boucher, Willie Desjardins and Brad Shaw (to name a few.) You can also throw the four recently dismissed bench bosses in the mix — John Tortorella, Peter Horachek, Kirk Muller and Adam Oates — though the bloom is definitely off the rose to a varying degree for all of them.

Here are some things to consider regarding the Laviolette hire:

One of the better offense-minded candidates is gone

In today’s release, Nashville cited Laviolette’s “offensive-minded philosophy” as one of the key reasons for his hire. Six times in eight seasons Laviolette’s teams finished in the NHL’s top-10 in goals scored; he was also credited for the maturation and development of Claude Giroux, James van Riemsdyk, Wayne Simmonds and Matt Read in Philadelphia (Nashville GM David Poile also praised Laviolette for developing Eric Staal in Carolina). The Preds probably weren’t the only team looking for an offensive punch, either — Carolina finished 22nd in the NHL in goals last year, Vancouver 28th and Florida 29th.

One of the most experienced candidates is gone

Experience often matters when looking for a new coach, and Laviolette has plenty of it. He has nearly 400 career wins, won a Cup in Carolina in 2006 and, four years later, took the Flyers all the way to the final before losing to Chicago. That’s big. In Florida, GM Dale Tallon said he wants an experienced bench boss this time around — after his last three were rookie head coaches — and Laviolette’s name had come up with regards to the vacancy.

He was actually available to interview

One of the problems facing teams right now is that several prime candidates are busy, y’know, coaching their teams. Stevens, the assistant in Los Angeles, is in the midst of the Stanley Cup playoffs; Blashill (AHL Grand Rapids) and Desjardins (AHL Texas) are currently up against one another in the Calder Cup Western Conference semifinal. It also stands to reason that a number of GMs are waiting to see what happens with Carlyle and McLellan, both of whom are still under contract. According to whispers, the McLellan watch is already on in Vancouver.

Lucic: If I wanted to hurt Couture, ‘I would have hurt him’


Last night in Los Angeles, Kings forward Milan Lucic received a match penalty after skating the entire width of the ice to give San Jose’s Logan Couture a two-hand shove to the face.

Lucic didn’t hurt Couture, who had caught Lucic with an open-ice hit that Lucic didn’t like. Couture’s smiling, mocking face was good evidence that the Sharks’ forward was going to be OK.

This morning, Lucic was still in disbelief that he was penalized so harshly.

“I didn’t cross any line,” Lucic said, per Rich Hammond of the O.C. Register. “Believe me, if my intentions were to hurt him, I would have hurt him.”

While Lucic knew he deserved a penalty, he said after the game that he didn’t “know why it was called a match penalty.” His coach, Darryl Sutter, agreed, calling it “a borderline even roughing penalty.”

And though former NHL referee Kerry Fraser believes a match penalty was indeed warranted, Lucic said this morning that he hasn’t heard from the NHL about any possible supplemental discipline.

Nor for that matter has Dustin Brown, after his high hit on Couture in the first period.

In conclusion, it’s good to have hockey back.

Related: Sutter says Kings weren’t ‘interested’ in checking the Sharks

Torres apologizes to Silfverberg and Sharks


A statement from Raffi Torres:

“I accept the 41-game suspension handed down to me by the NHL’s Department of Player Safety. I worked extremely hard over the last two years following reconstructive knee surgery to resume my NHL career, and this is the last thing I wanted to happen. I am disappointed I have put myself in a position to be suspended again. I sincerely apologize to Jakob for the hit that led to this suspension, and I’m extremely thankful that he wasn’t seriously injured as a result of the play. I also want to apologize to my Sharks teammates and the organization.”

A statement from San Jose GM Doug Wilson:

“The Sharks organization fully supports the NHL’s supplementary discipline decision regarding Raffi. While we do not believe there was any malicious intent, this type of hit is unacceptable and has no place in our game. There is a difference between playing hard and crossing the line and there is no doubt, in this instance, Raffi crossed that line. We’re very thankful that Jakob was not seriously injured as a result of this play.”

Silfverberg says he expects to play Saturday when the Ducks open their regular season Saturday in San Jose.