Get your game notes: Wild at Avalanche

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Tonight on CNBC, it’s the Colorado Avalanche hosting the Minnesota Wild starting at 9:30 p.m. ET. Following are some game notes, as compiled by the NHL on NBC research team:

• First-year head coach Patrick Roy led the Avalanche to their first postseason berth since the 2009-10 season, when they lost in the first round to the eventual champion Chicago Blackhawks. They will be meeting the Wild in the playoffs for the third time (each club won once in the Western Conference Quarterfinals – Minnesota in 2003, Colorado in 2008). The 19-year NHL career of Roy – the all-time postseason leader in wins (151) and losses (94) – ended with a Game 7 OT loss to the Wild in 2003.

• The Avalanche jumped from 29th in the NHL standings (39 pts., .406 points %) in 2012-13 to third overall (112 pts., .683) in 2013-14, becoming the first club since the league expanded to 21 teams in 1979 to go from the bottom three to top three in a single season. The Avs matched a franchise record with 52 wins, established in 2000-01, when they won their second of two Stanley Cups (1995-96).

• Avs goaltender Semyon Varlamov set a franchise single-season record with an NHL-high 41 victories, surpassing coach Patrick Roy’s previous high of 40 set in 2000-01. Varlamov went from leading the league in losses (21 in 2012-13) to leading the league in wins in one season. Tonight, he will be making his Colorado postseason debut. He posted a 10-9 record with Washington in 2008-09 and 2009-10.

• This season, Minnesota center Mikko Koivu became the franchise career leader in points (451). Over his nine-year NHL career, the Wild captain has 19 goals and 43 points vs. Colorado (regular season and postseason), both personal highs vs. any team. In the 2008 Western Conference series vs. the Avs, he scored a goal in each of the first four games. Since then, however, he has gone without a point in his last seven playoff games (two vs. Colorado, both losses, and five last season vs. Chicago.)

• Avalanche winger Nathan MacKinnon, who led all NHL rookies in goals (24, tied with Tampa Bay’s Tyler Johnson), assists (39) and points (63), is the prohibitive favorite to win the Calder Memorial Trophy as the league’s top rookie when awards are handed out at the Stanley Cup Final. The last time the team of the eventual Rookie of the Year won a round in that year’s playoffs was in the 1999-2000 season when Scott Gomez won the individual award and his New Jersey Devils won the Stanley Cup.

• Five different Wild goaltenders picked up wins this season: Josh Harding (18), Darcy Kuemper (12), Ilya Bryzgalov (7), Niklas Backstrom (5) and John Curry (1). The last time a playoff-bound team had five goalies with at least one win during the regular season was the 2008-09 Columbus Blue Jackets. Columbus was swept in four games in the first round by the eventual champion Detroit. Elias Sports Bureau

• The Wild’s season leader in goals (30) and points (60), Jason Pominville became only the third player in franchise history to reach the 30-goal mark, joining Marian Gaborik (five times) and Brian Rolston (three). The Wild were 15-8-4 when Pominville scored a goal this season, but only 6-6-0 on the road.

• Avalanche defenseman Erik Johnson, the first overall pick in the 2006 NHL Draft, will be making his NHL postseason debut tonight. Johnson, who had 39 points (nine goals, 30 assists) in his sixth season, entered the playoffs with 409 regular-season games under his belt, the second-most among all players appearing in their first playoff games this season (Blake Comeau, Columbus – 423 games).

 

Evander Kane ejected for cross-checking Bellemare in the head

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The first game of the second-round of the Stanley Cup Playoffs turned out to be a total dumpster fire for the San Jose Sharks on Thursday night.

Not only were they completely dominated from the opening faceoff by the Vegas Golden Knights, they also lost their composure, taking nine penalties and giving Vegas two separate 5-on-3 power plays on the night.

The second two-man advantage happened because Sharks forward Evander Kane got himself thrown out of the game for cross-checking Pierre-Edouard Bellemare in the face after the whistle.

You can see the play in the video above.

[NBC’s Stanley Cup Playoff Hub]

That came with Vegas already trailing 5-0 on on the scoreboard. Vegas converted twice on the ensuing major penalty to open up a 7-0 lead.

This could have quite an impact on the series because that will probably get a serious look from the NHL’s Department of Player Safety for a potential suspension. The league has already issued four suspensions this postseason and we have only completed one round of the playoffs. Keep in mind there was only one suspension throughout the entire postseason a year ago.

Acquired from the Buffalo Sabres at the NHL trade deadline, Kane entered play on Thursday with three goals and an assist in the Sharks’ first four playoff games. He scored 29 goals and had 54 total points during the regular season in 78 games. Nine of those goals and five of those assists came as a member of the Sharks.

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Adam Gretz is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @AGretz.

Vegas jumps all over Sharks with four first period goals

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The Vegas Golden Knights magic does not appear to be running out.

After stunning the hockey world by winning the Pacific Division in their inaugural season, Vegas easily dispatched the Los Angeles Kings in the first-round with a clean four-game sweep, setting the stage for a second-round matchup with the San Jose Sharks.

That second-round matchup opened on Thursday night and Vegas continued to do what it has done all season — jump all over teams early and with no mercy.

The Golden Knights opened the game with four consecutive goals in the first period from four different players as Cody Eakin, Erik Haula, Jonathan Marchessault, and Alex Tuch all scored goals.

[NBC’s Stanley Cup Playoff Hub]

Tuch’s goal was especially beautiful as he effortlessly cut through four Sharks defenders

Just in case you have forgotten, the Golden Knights ended up getting Tuch because the Minnesota Wild gave him to them to convince them to take Haula in the expansion draft, and they were able to get Marchessault from the Florida Panthers for taking on Reilly Smith‘s contract. A lot of general managers around the NHL made bad decisions to help build this team.

Along with the offensive outburst, Marc-Andre Fleury stopped all 15 shots he faced in the period.

Related: Don’t blame expansion draft rules for Vegas’ success, blame your GM

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Adam Gretz is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @AGretz.

Penguins stun Capitals with Game 1 comeback

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With the Pittsburgh Penguins entering Game 1 of their second-round series without Evgeni Malkin and Carl Hagelin, it looked like a great opportunity for the Washington Capitals to jump on them early.

Through 45 minutes it seemed like that was going to happen.

Braden Holtby was stopping everything in net. Alex Ovechkin scored 25 seconds into the third period to give the Capitals a two-goal lead. They were in a great position to take the first game of the series.

Then, for already the third time this postseason, the Capitals allowed a two-goal lead to turn into a loss when the Penguins scored three consecutive goals in four minutes to storm back for a 3-2 win.

[NBC’s Stanley Cup Playoff Hub]

The Pittsburgh comeback started with a Patric Hornqvist deflection of a Justin Schultz shot to finally beat Holtby.

Then the Sidney CrosbyJake Guentzel connection took over.

Crosby tied the game just three minutes after Hornqvist’s goal when he one-timed a shot off the rush that beat Holtby through the five-hole, and then Guentzel gave the Penguins the lead when he was able to get his stick on a Crosby shot to beat Holtby. Both Crosby and Guentzel have seven goals on this postseason, while Guentzel has factored into eight of the Penguins’ past nine goals over the past two games. He has scored five of them. Overall this postseason he has 15 total points (seven goals, eight assists) in seven games. This after after leading the league in postseason goal-scoring a season ago.

The Penguins have now won consecutive games without Malkin after taking Game 6 in Philadelphia on Sunday. That game also saw the Penguins erase a two-goal deficit thanks to four third period goals. Malkin traveled with the team to Washington, skated with the team on Thursday, and could be available for Game 2 on Sunday afternoon. The extra day off between games could be helpful for him.

Meanwhile, Penguins goalie Matt Murray was tremendous when he needed to be on Thursday night and played a huge role in the comeback, even if it might get lost in the third period goal-scoring outburst. The two goals he gave up were on odd-man rushes following defensive breakdowns in front of him (including one just 17 seconds into the game when Evgeny Kuznetsov was able to walk in alone), but other than that he was nearly flawless the rest of the way, stopping 32 of the 34 shots he faced.

Game 2 is Sunday afternoon at 3 p.m. ET on NBC.

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Adam Gretz is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @AGretz.

NHL reportedly asked Brad Marchand to stop licking opposing players

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Sportsnet’s Elliotte Friedman regals readers with many great nuggets in his regular “31 Thoughts” column, but this bit on how the NHL reportedly responded to Brad Marchand‘s obnoxious kissing/licking of Leo Komarov from Game 1 (see the video above) might just take/taste the cake:

22. After Game 1 of the Toronto/Boston series, the Bruins got a, “We’d prefer if you could tell Brad Marchand to stop licking people” phone call from the NHL.

Seems fair enough?

[NBC’s Stanley Cup Playoff Hub]

That said, you wonder if the NHL might have sent the Boston Bruins pest a better message by, say, handing him a fine for unsportsmanlike conduct? The league could have attached a helpful message, such as: “There are better ways to tell Leo Komarov that you like his cologne.”

(One can only imagine how harsh the discipline might have been if Sean Avery was the one committing this … infraction.)

As a reminder, Marchand addressed his actions after that Game 1 win, not exactly apologizing for his actions:

You could say that Marchand had the last laugh being that the Boston Bruins ended up winning the series in Game 7 thanks to last night’s 7-4 win. Then again, Komarov didn’t get to dress for that game, so it doesn’t seem totally fair.

The bottom line is that Marchand revels in this sort of controversy, even as he’s gone from a good player with bad habits to an elite one who still makes questionable decisions.

Even last night’s Game 7 was an example of the kind of competitor he is. While Kasperi Kapanen shook him off for a memorable shorthanded go-ahead goal, Marchand got the last laugh, celebrating after an empty-netter that sapped any remaining drama from the game.

While Marchand surely gives the Bruins headaches with his antics and sometimes suspensions – don’t forget that there were years of rumors that his behavior might get him traded, at least before he jumped another level or two – he’s a huge part of a dominant line with Patrice Bergeron and David Pastrnak. For all we know, Marchand wouldn’t be the same player if he avoided some of the uglier stuff. Hockey is a violent, emotional sport, after all.

Still, if you’re the Tampa Bay Lightning, you must be wondering: “Could we be the team to get the better of Marchand?” Few teams have the firepower to match that top line (not to mention a defender to make life tougher for them in Victor Hedman), so maybe the Bolts will find a way to push Marchand closer to becoming a net-positive?

One thing’s for sure: the NHL will be keeping an eye on what Marchand does, so he better … watch his mouth.

James O’Brien is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @cyclelikesedins.