George McPhee

Has McPhee’s ‘adversarial relationship with player agents’ cost the Caps?


The Capitals’ fall from one of the most dynamic teams in the NHL to, well, whatever it is they are today (not in the playoffs, for one) has been well-documented. But the Washington Post’s Katie Carrera has documented it particularly well here.

In a lengthy article titled “Washington Capitals’ problems began long before their playoff streak ended,” Carrera deftly recaps a lot of the stuff fans already knew about the Caps (they’ve changed systems a few times, captain Alex Ovechkin is a lightning rod for criticism, etc.), while also sharing some tidbits that aren’t quite so well-known.

For example, apparently Caps management isn’t the most popular among agents, and that’s affected their ability to attract players:

Even with persistent vacancies, the Capitals haven’t been able to find long-term solutions. According to multiple league sources, that can be attributed partly to what they describe as McPhee’s adversarial relationship with player agents, whose grievances include his refusal to communicate with them directly and limiting their postgame access to clients.

When a key free agent or a player with a no-trade clause — one who can name what teams he will play for — is available, the Capitals intentionally aren’t on the list, one NHL agent explained.

“It’s hostile,” another agent said. “Why would anyone encourage their client to play there when the organization intentionally makes it incredibly difficult to work with them?”

Yesterday, Caps owner Ted Leonsis wrote a blog post promising to “conduct a comprehensive review of what transpired this year.”

It’s been widely speculated that McPhee, as well as head coach Adam Oates, could be replaced.

Related: Halak’s agent ‘bewildered’ by Oates’ remarks prior to Blues game

Video: Flyers, Bolts confirm 3-on-3 OT is pretty much the greatest thing ever


Well, the NHL’s two new initiatives for ’15-16 seem to be going swimmingly.

Not long after Ottawa successfully made the second-ever coach’s challenge, fans got their first look at 3-on-3 overtime.

And what a look it was.

In the span of 137 seconds, the Tampa Bay Lightning and Philadelphia Flyers combined for eight shots on goal, a few breakaways, some tremendous saves — including one on a penalty shot — and, finally, Jason Garrison‘s game-winning goal on a breakaway from center, giving the Bolts a 3-2 win.

It was, in a word, fun.

Lots of fun.

A quick sampling of reviews:

Of course, not everybody was a fan:

Now, to temper things a bit — this was the first time we’ve seen 3-on-3 with something on the line, so there was a novelty factor at play. There’s also no guaranteeing future OT sessions will be as exciting as this.

But none of that takes away from the fact 3-on-3 made for appointment viewing, and immense entertainment value. The prospect of future games like this? That’s pretty exciting.

In Jets return, Burmistrov delivers headshot to Bergeron (Updated)


Didn’t take long for Alex Burmistrov to make his presence felt — though not in a good way.

Burmistrov, playing in his first game for the Jets after a two-year stint in Russia, delivered a questionable elbow to the head of Boston’s Patrice Bergeron late in the first period of Thursday’s season-opener:

Burmistrov received a two-minute minor for an illegal check to the head, while Bergeron received a matching minor for roughing (retaliating for the elbow, specifically).

The Bruins went into the intermission leading 1-0, and have yet to update Bergeron’s status.

Update: Bergeron stayed in the game, but B’s head coach Claude Julien was none too pleased with the hit. Following the game, he called for the NHL’s Department of Player Safety to look at it…