Get your game notes: Wild at Blackhawks

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Tonight on NBCSN, it’s the Chicago Blackhawks hosting the Minnesota Wild starting at 8 p.m. ET. Following are some game notes, as compiled by the NHL on NBC research team:

• Losers of three straight in regulation (all away games), the Blackhawks return home tonight seeking to avoid their second four-game losing streak of the season (0-2-2 from Jan. 22-28). Only three teams in NHL history have had losing streaks of four or more games after March 1 and gone on to win the Stanley Cup: the 1936 Red Wings (0-4-0), the 1986 Canadiens (0-6-0) and the 2011 Bruins (0-2-2).

• The Wild are 3-1-0 vs. the Blackhawks this season. In their only trip to the United Center this season, on Oct. 26, Minnesota defeated Chicago 5-3, thanks in large part to two goals by winger Jason Pominville. Since 2000-01 (the season the Wild entered the NHL), they have the league’s fifth-best regular-season road record against Chicago (13-10-1, .563 points%). Minimum: 10 games played…

Team | Road record at CHI, 2000-present | Points%
1. Detroit, 20-11-7, .618
2. Vancouver, 12-7-5, .604
3. Anaheim, 14-9-3, .596
4. Phoenix, 10-6-7, .587
5. Minnesota, 13-10-1, .563

• The Blackhawks will be without both captain Jonathan Toews (upper body) and winger Patrick Kane (leg) for the rest of the regular season. Tonight’s game will mark only the second time since the stars entered the NHL (2007-08) that they will both be out of the Hawks’ lineup. They were rested in the final game of the 2012-13 season, a 3-1 loss at St. Louis.

• Wild winger Zach Parise needs one point to reach 500 for his NHL career (240 goals, 259 assists). He has been on a tear lately, with four goals in his last three games and five in his last five, for a team-high 28 goals in 61 games this season. The Wild are 18-3-2 when he scores a goal.

• Blackhawks winger Marian Hossa needs nine points in Chicago’s final six games to become the 80th player in NHL history (and seventh active) to register 1,000 points. Of his 461 career goals, 29 are shorthanded, tied for the most among active players (Rangers’ Martin St. Louis).

• Wild captain Mikko Koivu enters tonight’s game on a season-long, six-game point streak (two goals, seven assists) which included three multi-point games (all wins). The Wild are 79-17-9 when their all-time leading scorer (447 points) registers two or more points.

• The Blackhawks rank second in the NHL in goals (243) and goals/game (3.20), trailing Anaheim (245 goals, 3.22 goals/game) in both. Their leading goal-getter, winger Patrick Sharp (31 goals, T-11th in the NHL) has recorded career-highs in assists (42), points (73, T-9th in the NHL) and shots on goal (294, 2nd in the NHL). Since the beginning of the 2012-13 season, the Hawks are 25-2-3 when Sharp scores.

• Wild goaltender Ilya Bryzgalov is 4-0-2 with a 2.16 GAA, .909 save% and one shutout since his acquisition from Edmonton on Mar. 4. However, the “Madhouse on Madison” has been a house of horrors for the 33-year-old Russian netminder since the 2007-08 season. In six starts (all with Phoenix), he is 0-5-1, with a 4.23 GAA and .865 save%. Prior to that, he had won his two starts, with Anaheim.

• Wild head coach Mike Yeo, the youngest bench boss in the NHL (40 years old), picked up career win number 100 vs. Los Angeles on Monday. It took Yeo 206 games to become the second coach in franchise history to reach the milestone. The first, Jacques Lemaire (who won 293 games for Minnesota from 2000-2009), needed 262 games to pick up his first 100 wins with the Wild.

Laviolette: Early struggles, injuries made Predators ‘stronger as a team’

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After a second-round playoff appearance and trading for P.K. Subban several weeks later last offseason, expectations for the Nashville Predators were perhaps the highest they’ve ever been entering a new season.

And then they went out and started with an underwhelming 2-5-1 record through October.

When you think of those players that have been so critical to Nashville’s success in this run to the Stanley Cup Final versus the Penguins, most of them struggled mightily in that first month.

From PHT on Oct. 31:

Ryan Johansen isn’t helping much either. The 24-year-old center had three assists in the Preds’ first game, but just one in the next seven. He has no goals and has yet to register a point at even strength. In fact, he hasn’t even been on the ice for a Nashville goal at five-on-five!

Filip Forsberg doesn’t have a goal either, and James Neal has but one.

Meanwhile, the top pairing of P.K. Subban and Roman Josi are minus-7 and minus-6, respectively, with the possession stats to match.

And then there’s Pekka Rinne, who’s 1-4-1 with a .906 save percentage. Not helping.

Sounds bad.

But, looking back on that first month, head coach Peter Laviolette preached patience as the Predators worked to get out of that early hole.

“There was a lot of talk coming out of October about what was wrong and that we weren’t right,” said Laviolette on Sunday. “I kept saying internally, ‘That’s OK, it’s OK to struggle a little bit, to have to work to figure out who we are as a team, who we are as a group, who is driving the bus, where the seats are, and to have to figure a way out of something.’”

In November, the Predators turned around and went 9-3-2 that month.

“We were building something at that point,” said Laviolette.

“Even though December and some of January we were struggling a little bit, we were dealing with a lot of injuries. Not that that is an excuse, because every team has to deal with them. We were trying to move through that.”

For all their early problems, the Predators finished the season among the better puck possession teams in the league and qualified for a wild card spot in the West.

All of those aforementioned players that struggled in October eventually saw their fortunes turn around. Johansen had 61 points as their No. 1 center, Forsberg had another 30-plus goal season and Viktor Arvidsson (he wasn’t mentioned) emerged on that top line with his own 31-goal, 61-point season.

A pending restricted free agent, Arvidsson is surely in line for a substantial raise from the $650,000 average annual value attached to his current deal.

Oh, and the Predators’ defense, with Subban and Josi, has become arguably the best blue line group in the league. Rinne? He has a .941 save percentage in these playoffs, as Nashville rolled over the Blackhawks, Blues and Ducks to get into the championship series.

From sitting 29th in the standings at the end of October, the Predators are now four wins away from a Stanley Cup. The challenge only gets more difficult, especially against a talented and deep Penguins team.

The Predators won’t have Ryan Johansen. But it looks like Mike Fisher could return for Game 1 on Monday. In the absence of both players last round against Anaheim, the Predators were lifted in part by the performance of Colton Sissons, who had a hat trick in the series clincher.

“I think when we got to the last third of the season, our guys had been through a lot,” said Laviolette. “Things had moved around a little bit. We became stronger as a team internally.

“More than anything, I think we were built in order to get to this point.”

Predators’ Fisher, Penguins’ Hornqvist could return for Game 1 of Stanley Cup Final

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The Nashville Predators won’t have Ryan Johansen for the Stanley Cup Final, but it appears they will likely get another center back into their lineup for the beginning of this series.

Mike Fisher hasn’t played since Game 4 of the Western Conference Final because of an undisclosed injury.

But he did take part in Sunday’s practice ahead of Game 1 versus the Pittsburgh Penguins, and provided an optimistic outlook for his status heading into Monday, telling reporters he was “ready to rock.”

The Predators could also get Craig Smith back, as well. He hasn’t played since May 7 because of a lower-body injury, but also practiced Sunday. All players currently on the trip will be available, said Predators coach Peter Laviolette.

Even with Fisher nearing a return, the Predators are still in tough at center without Johansen, especially given Pittsburgh’s talent up the middle, beginning of course with Sidney Crosby and Evgeni Malkin.

“Certainly you’re talking about a couple good centermen that we have to face,” said Predators general manager David Poile. “We had a couple good centermen (Ryan Getzlaf and Ryan Kesler) last round that we had to face.”

For the Penguins, who have dealt with a long list of injuries, particularly on defense, in this postseason, there was promising news about the status of forward Patric Hornqvist, who has missed the last six games.

Hornqvist, who on seven occasions has scored 20 or more goals in a single season, took the warm-up skate prior to Game 7 of the Eastern Conference Final versus Ottawa, but didn’t play.

“We obviously chose to hold him out for reasons that we’ll keep amongst ourselves,” said Penguins coach Mike Sullivan.

“But his status is he’s obviously been cleared for practice today. He practiced today. He’ll be a game-time decision. But based on the way that he practiced today, we’re certainly encouraged.”

Trevor Daley eager to play in first Stanley Cup Final, after missing last year’s series due to injury

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Forced to watch last year’s championship series as a spectator, Pittsburgh Penguins defenseman Trevor Daley will now get his chance to play in the Stanley Cup Final.

Last spring, Daley suffered a broken ankle in the Eastern Conference Final, ending his postseason.

He didn’t play in the final, which Pittsburgh captured in six games, but did lift the Stanley Cup, the first player after Sidney Crosby to do so — a gesture from the Penguins captain to Daley, whose mother was battling cancer and wanted to see her son with hockey’s coveted silver chalice.

A week later, Daley’s mother passed away.

Despite missing time late in the second round and early in the third round because of injury, Daley returned to the Penguins lineup and played the final five games versus the Ottawa Senators. That’s a boost to Pittsburgh’s blue line, which has battled through injuries to key figures during the playoffs and even before with the loss of Kris Letang.

Daley’s wait for this opportunity will soon be over. Game 1 against the Nashville Predators goes Monday.

“It feels like we were just here. To get back here this soon is pretty cool,” said Daley on Sunday.  “It sucks to watch. I don’t know how you guys do it.”

It’s a rare feat in the salary cap era for a Stanley Cup-winning team to even make it back to the final the following year. The Detroit Red Wings were the last team to do that, back in 2008 and 2009.

“I think he understands how difficult it is to win the Stanley Cup,” said Penguins coach Mike Sullivan. “So I think he’s one of those guys that doesn’t take it for granted.”

Since his return during the last round, Daley has played 21:39 per game, with a two-point performance in that Game 5 blowout win versus the Senators. What makes Pittsburgh’s run back to the final more impressive is the fact they’ve made it — and that includes a second-round victory against Presidents’ Trophy-winning Washington — without a true No. 1 defenseman, a distinction that usually belongs to Letang, except his season came to an end before the playoffs began.

Daley has been hurt during this postseason. So, too, has Justin Schultz. All of the injuries on defense meant greater responsibility for Brian Dumoulin, Olli Maatta, Ron Hainsey and Ian Cole.

Daley has been back for a while now. Schultz returned for Game 7 versus Ottawa and played more than 24 minutes, with a goal and an assist. But with the injuries on defense, the Penguins have redefined the phrase ‘defense by committee.’

Depth on the blue line was an issue general manager Jim Rutherford addressed at the deadline, acquiring the 36-year-old Hainsey.

Despite his age and more than 900 games of regular season experience, Hainsey had never played a Stanley Cup playoff game in his career. At least, not until this spring. He has one goal and five points in 19 playoff games this year. He’s never been known for eye-popping offensive production, but what he has done for the Penguins is provide a reliable presence on defense and quality ice time, averaging more than 21 minutes per game.

It’s been a long time coming, but now, he too will play in the final.

“We all know about it. This is his first time in the playoffs. I was telling him the other day, ‘You’re undefeated. You’ve never lost a series,'” said Daley. “So that’s a pretty good record so far.”

On the big stage, Subban can’t escape ‘The Trade’

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PITTSBURGH — Three hundred and thirty-three days.

That’s how long it’s been since the Canadiens and Predators pulled off the seismic P.K. Subban-for-Shea Weber trade.

The deal was made on June 29, 2016. Today is May 28, 2017.

Three hundred and thirty-three days.

You’d think, then, given all that’s transpired in between, Subban would have plenty of topics to discuss on Sunday for Stanley Cup Final media day. He could talk about the first Cup Final in Preds franchise history, for example. Or maybe his role on what’s become the league’s best blueline. Perhaps some thoughts on Nashville’s emergence as a hockey market.

Nah. Because people still wanted to talk about The Trade.

So P.K. obliged.

“When David [Poile, Nashville’s GM] made that trade, whether we wanted to say it or not, a lot of people touted it to be a boost that was going to put us over the top,” Subban said, replying to the first of many questions about the now famous deal. “I didn’t really see it that way, but it seems that for our team, we just gelled at the right time and we’ve been clicking down the stretch.

“I guess you could say I’m definitely happier. Just to come in and do my job every day, whether that’s to play 32 minutes or play 15. I’m just happy to do whatever it takes to win.”

To be fair, it’s not like talking about The Trade rehashes old stuff. Quite the opposite, what with new storylines emerging on a weekly basis. The latest? Well, a question was asked today if Subban would bring the Cup back to Montreal, should he win it. Which came on the heels of the narrative that, in just one year, P.K. and the Preds got to where P.K. and the Habs couldn’t over the previous seven.

So, back to The Trade.

“One of the toughest things for me to think about was coming into a locker room that [Weber had] been in for 12 years, and figure out how I was going to fit in,” Subban said. “Because he had such a great presence, and such a great career in Nashville. I’m sure when he had to go to Montreal, he had to do similar things as well.

“When I got traded, I said it. Now, I don’t know if I want to look back, but I said I felt like I could win a Stanley Cup with this hockey club. I’m sure [Weber] felt the same way too when he was here.”

Winning the Cup was what Poile envisioned after making the deal. He recalled his first meeting with Subban and how, early into it, the two squared away any issues that might arise from Subban’s off-ice interests — his charity work, his foundation, his growing media presence, etc. etc.

Poile:

The whole idea was to get on the same page. Just the first meeting we had, like, ‘What are your goals?’

He said, ‘To win the Stanley Cup.’

I said, ‘That’s what our goals are, too.’

If we can get that straightened away in terms of your desires to be the best hockey player you can be, and we can both work towards winning the Stanley Cup together, we’ve got mostly everything covered. The other parts of your life, what you do off the ice, we would like to be there to support you.

I think the most important thing is that the left hand knows what the right hand is doing so there’s no surprising and, to repeat again, we can support you.

I don’t want to say it was as simple as that, but I think it was as simple as that.

Finally, everyone knows you can’t talk about The Trade without asking The Question.

And so it was posed to Subban. You’re in the Cup Final. The Habs were bounced in Round 1.

Who won it?

“What Shea brings and what I bring — maybe we have some similarities, but we have some differences as well,” Subban explained. “As far as who wins the trade, I think that both teams are different and were looking for something different.

“I don’t think I can really debate who won the trade. I’ll allow you guys to do that, you guys got all the stats and the numbers and statistics. I’m just focused on our team right now.”

And with that, Subban was done talking about The Trade.

For today, anyway.