Dallas Stars v San Jose Sharks

Who are the most disciplined and undisciplined teams in the NHL?


Let’s continue our best-and-worst series (see: special teams, shot differential, 5-on-5 scoring) with a look at discipline. Or in the case of teams like the Senators, Bruins and Jets, a lack thereof:

PPs PKs Diff
1 SJS 262 195 67
2 CAR 257 222 35
3 DAL 255 232 23
4 NYR 237 214 23
5 PIT 246 226 20
6 NYI 247 229 18
7 FLA 243 228 15
8 MIN 228 219 9
9 CGY 224 217 7
10 PHX 259 253 6
11 NSH 220 215 5
12 ANA 244 240 4
13 CHI 234 230 4
14 EDM 248 245 3
15 WSH 262 259 3
16 MTL 256 257 -1
17 STL 249 250 -1
18 COL 218 220 -2
19 CBJ 248 251 -3
20 TBL 235 240 -5
21 DET 251 264 -13
22 LAK 258 271 -13
23 BUF 226 242 -16
24 NJD 214 231 -17
25 VAN 232 249 -17
26 TOR 229 247 -18
27 PHI 262 284 -22
28 WPG 235 264 -29
29 BOS 202 239 -37
30 OTT 239 287 -48


Unlike the three other things we’ve looked at in this series, there doesn’t seem to be a strict relationship between winning/losing and taking fewer/more penalties. Yes, the Sharks are one of the NHL’s elite, but the Hurricanes, Islanders, and Panthers sure aren’t. Conversely, while the Senators have had a tough season, the Bruins sure haven’t.

San Jose’s differential certainly stands out though, just because it’s such a big number. The Sharks have been shorthanded the fewest times per game (2.64) while averaging the sixth-most power plays (3.54).

“I think it’s a big reason why we have the success we’ve had so far winning games,” forward Tommy Wingels said in January. “[On] a lot of teams, the power play guys get paid a lot to produce on the power play. You have to keep them without the man advantage. When you stay disciplined, you often times limit the other team’s scoring opportunities. That’s what we try to do defensively.”

Related: Hitch says killing penalties is more important than scoring on the power play

Dropping like flies: Johnson, Killorn hurt in Bolts’ exhibition

Montreal Canadiens v Tampa Bay Lightning - Game One
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You probably know the drill: injury updates are murky in the NHL basically from the moment a puck drops.

We’ll learn more once the 2015-16 season begins, but at the moment, Saturday might have served as a costly night for the Tampa Bay Lightning. Both Tyler Johnson and Alex Killorn went down with injuries stemming from a 3-2 pre-season win against the Florida Panthers.

“Guys were dropping like flies,” Steven Stamkos told the Tamba Bay Times.

These could be minor situations – just about any ailment will sideline a key asset this time of year – yet one cannot help but wonder if the Lightning might limp into this campaign.

Nikita Kucherov is dealing with his own issues, so that means at least minor issues for one half of the Bolts’ top six forwards.

It’s believed that more will be known about these banged-up Bolts sometime on Sunday.

Raffi Torres gets match penalty for being Raffi Torres

Raffi Torres

With knee issues still limiting him, Raffi Torres isn’t as mobile as he once was. Apparently he still moves well enough to leave the usual path of destruction.

It’s the pre-season, so it’s unclear if we’ll get a good look at the check, but Torres received a match penalty for his hit on Anaheim Ducks forward Jakob Silfverberg.

Most accounts were pretty critical of the San Jose Sharks’ chief troublemaker:

It’s too early to tell if Silfverberg is injured. If he is, that’s a significant loss for the Ducks, as he really showed signs of fulfilling his promise (especially during the 2015 playoffs).

As far as Torres goes, he’s hoping to play in the Sharks’ season-opener. Wherever he ends up, he’ll certainly make plenty of enemies on the ice.

Whether it was because of that hit or just the general distaste shared by those sides, it sounds like tonight’s Sharks – Ducks exhibition is getting ugly, in general:

This post will be updated if video of the hit becomes available, and also if we get a better idea of Silfverberg’s condition.

Update: Bullet dodged?