Video: Dryden on why hockey should ‘give up the fighting, but keep the fight’


In an interview set to air following tonight’s Montreal-Boston Rivalry Night game on NBCSN, Bob Costas and Hockey Hall of Famer Ken Dryden discuss a myriad topics, including the hot-button issue of fighting in hockey.

Here’s a snippet:

The Costas Tonight interview, set to air on Thursday, Mar. 13 at 12:30 a.m. ET on NBCSN and live online (click here), also touches on a number of other issues related to both current-day NHL news and Dryden’s storied career with the Canadiens, during which he won six Stanley Cups.

Topics include…

Dryden on ability to attend law school in the midst of his NHL career: “Imagine that you come out of Cornell, and the Montreal Canadiens are the team that has drafted you…you say to them, ‘I’m not sure, I really want to go to law school, I guess this isn’t going to work out,’ so the first year it didn’t. Then we spoke again…here was the general manager of the Montreal Canadiens saying, ‘OK, let’s work it out.’ And it was Sam Pollock that allowed that approach…because if I had to make a choice at that time, it would have been law school, and I never would have played (in the NHL)…this gave uniqueness a chance.”

Dryden on selecting the best hockey player of all time, and importance of history in sports: “The greatest player is the best player when you were 10 years old. When Bobby Orr was 10 years old [watching hockey], Gordie Howe was ‘10 feet tall.’ Gordie Howe could shoot the puck ‘1,000 miles-per-hour.’ Gordie Howe could skate ‘100 miles-an-hour.’ Bobby Orr grows up to skate faster than Gordie Howe, but in his head, Gordie’s moving 100 miles an hour. The greatest players have a sense of history…the worst is when you have a superstar in any sport who doesn’t have a sense of history, who thinks the game began with them and will end with them…it’s awful, because there is a disrespect that comes through.”

Dryden on Canada’s gold-medal game victory over Team USA in 2010 Winter Olympics: “In Vancouver, one team wanted deeply, deeply to win. The other team needed to win.”

Dryden on success of 1972 Summit Series for Canada and Soviet Union: “What did the Soviets want? They wanted to win the series. What did they need? They needed to show that hockey could be played at the highest level in a different way. What did Canadians want? We wanted to win eight straight, 10-0 every game. What did we need? To win the series. We both ended up getting what we absolutely needed out of that series.”

Related: Orr tells Costas there ‘should be a policeman’ to protect skill players

Jason Demers tweets #FreeTorres, gets mocked

Los Angeles Kings v San Jose Sharks - Game One

Following his stunning 41-game suspension, it looks like Raffi Torres has at least one former teammate in his corner.

We haven’t yet seen how the San Jose Sharks or the NHLPA are reacting to the league’s hammer-dropping decision to punish Torres for his Torres-like hit on Jakob Silfverberg, but Jason Demers decided to put in a good word for Torres tonight.

It was a simple message: “#FreeTorres.”

Demers, now of the Dallas Stars, was once with Torres and the Sharks. (In case this post’s main image didn’t make that clear enough already.)

Perhaps this will become “a thing” at some point.

So far, it seems like it’s instead “a thing (that people are making fun of).”

… You get the idea.

The bottom line is that there are some who either a) blindly support Torres because they’re Sharks fans or b) simply think that the punishment was excessive.

The most important statement came from the Department of Player Safety, though.

Bruins list Chara on IR, for now

Zdeno Chara

Those who feel as though the Boston Bruins may rebound – John Tortorella, maybe? – likely rest some of their optimism on the back of a healthy Zdeno Chara.

It’s possible that he’s merely limping into what may otherwise be a healthy 2015-16 season, but it’s definitely looking like a slow start thanks to a lower-body injury.

The latest sign of a bumpy beginning came on Monday, as several onlookers (including CSNNE.com’s Joe Haggerty) pointed out that Chara was listed on injured reserve.

As Haggerty notes, that move is retroactive to Sept. 24, so his status really just opens up options for the Bruins.

Still … it’s a little unsettling, isn’t it?

The Bruins likely realize that they need to transition away from their generational behemoth, but last season provided a stark suggestion that may not be ready yet. Trading Dougie Hamilton and losing Dennis Seidenberg to injury only make them more dependent on the towering 38-year-old.

This isn’t really something to panic about, yet it might leave a few extra seats open on the Bruins’ bandwagon.