SOCHI, RUSSIA - FEBRUARY 22: Zach Parise #9 of the United States looks on in the third period against Finland during the Men's Ice Hockey Bronze Medal Game on Day 15 of the 2014 Sochi Winter Olympics at Bolshoy Ice Dome on February 22, 2014 in Sochi, Russia.

U.S. players ’embarrassed’ after blowout loss


After losing 1-0 against Canada, the Americans still wanted to bring at least something back home with them. They just simply couldn’t.

Finland handed them a crushing 5-0 loss in the bronze medal game and left the U.S. players in no mood to sugarcoat things after an Olympics that started with such promise and ended so badly.

“I’m not proud at all right now,” American forward Max Pacioretty told the Pittsburgh Tribune-Review’s Dejan Kovacevic. “I don’t think anyone is. We were playing for a medal and didn’t show up.”

That’s a sentiment his teammates certainly seem to agree with.

“Disappointed,” Parise said. “A little embarrassing with what was on the line for is the last two days and not play well.”

The game certainly didn’t start terribly for the Americans. They out-shot Finland in the first period, but Parise confessed that they started to get frustrated after Teemu Selanne and Jussi Jokinen opened the contest up with goals just 11 seconds apart. As the game progressed and the United States’ chances of winning a medal diminished, that frustration only built until the team collapsed entirely.

There’s plenty of blame to go around, but obviously you can’t win if you don’t score. America had 20 goals in their first four Olympic games before being shutout of back-to-back contests. Parise’s assessment of why they dried up offensively was blunt.

“We played better teams,” Parise told Puck Daddy’s Greg Wyshynski.

The sting from this end will linger for a while. Perhaps it’s good that the United States has four years before it needs to bounce back.


Just Finn, baby: Finland medals again, routs U.S. for bronze

Two-for-two: Another successful coach’s challenge as Sens reverse Kane’s goal

Dave Cameron
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Coaches are quickly getting the hang of this challenge thing.

Following Mike Babcock’s successful challenge in Toronto’s opening-night loss to Montreal on Wednesday, Babcock’s provincial rival — Sens head coach Dave Cameron — got it right as well, successfully reversing Evander Kane‘s would-be equalizer in the third period.

From the league:

At 10:34 of the third period in the Senators/Sabres game, Ottawa requested a Coach’s Challenge to review whether Buffalo was off-side prior to Evander Kane’s goal.

After reviewing all available replays and consulting with NHL Hockey Operations staff, the Linesman determined that Buffalo’s Zemgus Girgensons was off-side prior to the goal. According to Rule 78.7, “The standard for overturning the call in the event of a ‘GOAL’ call on the ice is that the Linesman, after reviewing any and all available replays and consulting with the Toronto Video Room, determines that one or more Players on the attacking team preceded the puck into the attacking zone prior to the goal being scored and that, as a result, the play should have been stopped for an “Off-side” infraction; where this standard is met, the goal will be disallowed.”

Therefore the original call is overturned – no goal Buffalo Sabres.

The clock is re-set to show 9:32 (10:28 elapsed time), when the off-side infraction occurred.

As the league later noted, this was the first coach’s challenge under the offside scenario.

Video: Eichel’s first career NHL goal


Didn’t take long for Jack Eichel to make his mark at the NHL level.

The No. 2 overall pick at this year’s draft scored his first-ever NHL goal in his first-ever NHL game on Thursday night, cutting Ottawa’s lead to 2-1 in the third period of Buffalo’s season-opener.

Marcus Foligno and another new Sabre, Evander Kane, registered the assists on Eichel’s marker, which came on the power play.