SOCHI, RUSSIA - FEBRUARY 19: Alexander Ovechkin #8 of Russia looks on during the Men's Ice Hockey Quarterfinal Playoff against Finland on Day 12 of the 2014 Sochi Winter Olympics at Bolshoy Ice Dome on February 19, 2014 in Sochi, Russia.

Ovechkin: ‘It sucks. What else can I say?’


After Canada won the gold medal at home in the 2010 Winter Games, all the Russians wanted to do was replicate that level of success. They were faced with tremendous pressure, but it was matched by their desire, to the point where as far back as 2009, Alex Ovechkin was saying that he would play in Sochi even if the NHL decided not to participate in the games.

Well, he got to represent his country at home on the biggest international stage, but that’s as far as his dream played out. Russia struggled to gain any traction in the 2014 Olympics and were eliminated courtesy of a 3-1 loss to Finland in the quarterfinals.

“It sucks,” Ovechkin said, per’s Corey Masisak. “What else can I say?”

It all started with such promise too. Ovechkin found the back of the net just 77 seconds into the tournament, but then went the next 308:43 minutes without a goal. Although, in his defense, he was hardly the only Russia forward to fail to live up to expectations. With his nation out of the Olympics, he was left to wonder why a team with so many top-tier scorers struggled to get anything going offensively.

VIDEO: Highlights from Finland’s 3-1 win

“I don’t know. That’s a big question,” Ovechkin admitted to CBC’s Elliotte Friedman. “It’s tough. It’s the second Olympic Games that we lost in that kind of game and it’s bad.

“Team fight, team play ’til the end and nobody gave up, but we didn’t score second goal and it was pretty hard.”

And perhaps worst of all for Ovechkin, this will be another point in the argument that he can’t lead a team to glory. Whether or not that sentiment has merit, the fact that he has failed to get a medal in the Olympics or lead Washington past the second round of the playoffs remains a black mark on what has otherwise been a tremendous career thus far.

The silver lining is that at the age of 28, Ovechkin will have other opportunities to win it all on a major stage, even if his chance to claim an Olympic gold at home that was on his mind for years has slipped by in the blink of an eye.

Add Lecavalier to list of expensive Flyers healthy scratches

Vincent Lecavalier
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Are the Philadelphia Flyers aiming for some sort of record when it comes to expensive (potential) healthy scratches?

While lineups are obviously subject to change, notes that Vincent Lecavalier appears to be among a rather rich group of Flyers who are expected to sit during their season-opener.

Also likely to be in street clothes: Sam Gagner and Luke Schenn.

That’s $11.3 million in cap space rotting on the bench, and that’s only counting what the Flyers are paying Gagner.

“I really don’t know what to say,” Lecavalier said. “I’ll practice hard and be ready when they call me up.”

The quotes from Lecavalier, Gagner and Schenn only get sadder from there, a reminder that there are human beings attached to these numbers – whether you focus on disappointing stats or bloated salaries.

Flyers fans with the urge to reach for an Alka-Setzler can at least take some comfort in knowing that the team will see $6.8 million in savings after this season, as both Gagner and Schenn are on expiring deals.

It could be a long season, though, and this Lecavalier headache may not truly end until his contract expires following the 2017-18 campaign.

Video: NHL drops hammer, suspends Torres for 41 games


One of the NHL’s most notorious hitters has been tagged by the league.

On Monday, the Department of Player Safety announced that San Jose forward Raffi Torres has been suspended 41 games — half of the regular season — for an illegal check to the head of Anaheim’s Jakob Silfverberg.

The length of Torres’ suspension is a combination of the Silfverberg hit and Torres’ history of delivering hits to the heads of opposing players, including Jordan Eberle, Jarret Stoll, Nate Prosser and Marian Hossa.

“Torres has repeatedly violated league playing rules,” the Department of Player Safety explained. “And has been sanctioned multiple times for similar infractions.”

The league also noted that Torres has been warned, fined, or suspended on nine occasions over the course of his career, “the majority of which have involved a hit to an opponent’s head.”

“Same player every year,” Ducks forward Ryan Kesler said following the hit on Silfverberg. “I played with the guy [in Vancouver]. He needs to learn how to hit. That has no part in our game anymore.”

As for what lies ahead, things could get interesting upon potential appeal:

Torres successfully appealed a suspension under the previous CBA, getting his punishment for the Hossa hit reduced from 25 to 21 games.

Under terms of the new CBA, Torres isn’t categorized as a repeat offender because his last suspension came in May of 2013 — more than two years ago.

Of course, part of the reason Torres hasn’t run afoul of the league in two years is because he’s barely played.

Knee injuries limited Torres to just 12 games in ’13-14, and he sat out last season entirely.