SOCHI, RUSSIA - FEBRUARY 19: Alexander Ovechkin #8 of Russia looks on during the Men's Ice Hockey Quarterfinal Playoff against Finland on Day 12 of the 2014 Sochi Winter Olympics at Bolshoy Ice Dome on February 19, 2014 in Sochi, Russia.

Ovechkin: ‘It sucks. What else can I say?’


After Canada won the gold medal at home in the 2010 Winter Games, all the Russians wanted to do was replicate that level of success. They were faced with tremendous pressure, but it was matched by their desire, to the point where as far back as 2009, Alex Ovechkin was saying that he would play in Sochi even if the NHL decided not to participate in the games.

Well, he got to represent his country at home on the biggest international stage, but that’s as far as his dream played out. Russia struggled to gain any traction in the 2014 Olympics and were eliminated courtesy of a 3-1 loss to Finland in the quarterfinals.

“It sucks,” Ovechkin said, per’s Corey Masisak. “What else can I say?”

It all started with such promise too. Ovechkin found the back of the net just 77 seconds into the tournament, but then went the next 308:43 minutes without a goal. Although, in his defense, he was hardly the only Russia forward to fail to live up to expectations. With his nation out of the Olympics, he was left to wonder why a team with so many top-tier scorers struggled to get anything going offensively.

VIDEO: Highlights from Finland’s 3-1 win

“I don’t know. That’s a big question,” Ovechkin admitted to CBC’s Elliotte Friedman. “It’s tough. It’s the second Olympic Games that we lost in that kind of game and it’s bad.

“Team fight, team play ’til the end and nobody gave up, but we didn’t score second goal and it was pretty hard.”

And perhaps worst of all for Ovechkin, this will be another point in the argument that he can’t lead a team to glory. Whether or not that sentiment has merit, the fact that he has failed to get a medal in the Olympics or lead Washington past the second round of the playoffs remains a black mark on what has otherwise been a tremendous career thus far.

The silver lining is that at the age of 28, Ovechkin will have other opportunities to win it all on a major stage, even if his chance to claim an Olympic gold at home that was on his mind for years has slipped by in the blink of an eye.

Report: Sean Avery was arrested last week

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From the Southampton Press:

Sean Avery, the former National Hockey League player, was arrested by Southampton Village Police last week on two criminal charges.

According to authorities, Mr. Avery was arrested September 30 following a routine traffic stop on Jennings Avenue in the village at about 4:09 p.m. He was charged with fourth-degree criminal mischief and two counts of seventh-degree criminal possession of a controlled substance, all misdemeanors.

Police said the criminal mischief charge involved an incident the day before, when Mr. Avery allegedly threw objects at passing vehicles.

As for those counts of possession, according to the newspaper, Avery was found to have “two prescription drugs, acetaminophen with oxycodone and roxicodone.”

He was released on $500 bail and ordered to appear in court at a later date.

Did we mention he’s supposed to get married this weekend?

H/t Gawker

Devils send ’15 first-rounder Zacha back to junior

2015 NHL Draft - Round One

Pavel Zacha was this close to making his NHL debut.

Just days prior to opening their season against the Jets, the Devils returned Zacha — the sixth overall pick at this year’s draft — back to his junior club in OHL Sarnia.

The move comes after Zacha, 18, impressed throughout training camp and the preseason. He appeared in four exhibition games for New Jersey, scoring one point while endearing himself to the organizational brass, coaching staff and players.

“He understands the game. He plays with a maturity. It’s crazy to think an 18-year-old coming out of high school is up here and playing with the maturity and understanding of the game with the new system,” Kyle Palmieri told “I think he’s got a lot of raw talent there as a power forward. He’s got the body for it, the puck-handling skills and the nose for the net.”

At 6-foot-3 and 210 pounds, Zacha has the frame and physical stature to play at the NHL level, and looked the part for long stretches of the exhibition season, getting turns on New Jersey’s top line.

The decision to send him back to junior is probably the right one, however.

Zacha only turned 18 in April and has limited experience even at the OHL level; ’14-15 was his first year with Sarnia, though he did appear in 38 Czech League games (for Liberec) the season prior.