Slovenia forward Anze Kopitar, left, hugs goaltender Robert Kristan after Slovenia beat Slovakia 3-1 in a men's ice hockey game at the 2014 Winter Olympics, Saturday, Feb. 15, 2014, in Sochi, Russia. (AP Photo/Mark Humphrey )

Kopitar: Slovenians will remember this win long after we’re retired


Anze Kopitar already had a pretty impressive resume. He was the first Slovenian player in the NHL, has been named to two All-Star teams, and has won the Stanley Cup, but today’s 3-1 win against Slovakia could be one of the things he’s most known for in his home country long after his career is over.

It might not seem like a big deal compared to his other feats, but for a nation of a little more than two million people to come away with a win in its first ever trip to the Olympics, this is a special moment.

“It’s going to stick with us for a long long time and probably stick with Slovenian hockey long after we’re done playing,” Kopitar said, according to the Los Angeles Times’ Helene Elliott.

We got our first indication that something like this could happen when Slovenia held its own at times against Russia. While that was largely looked at in the context of what it said about the Russian squad, Slovenia has shown that it’s capable of more than what many would assume.

Perhaps it helps that, unlike Russia, which has the weight of a nation on its shoulders, or Slovakia, which was trying to live up to its impressive fourth place finish in 2010, Slovenia entered these games with rock bottom expectations.

“I don’t think the guys were nervous, not against Russia, not against Slovakia today, because we don’t have anything to lose,” said 34-year-old forward Tomaz Razingar, per the Olympic News Service.

He was playing in Sweden’s second-tier hockey league before the Olympics. He scored the opening goal against Jaroslav Halak.

“It’s kind of a miracle, but we know inside the locker room that we have good hockey players who can play at the top level,” said 30-year-old goaltender Robert Kristan.

He plays hockey in the Slovak league and today turned aside 27 of 28 shots, including four from Marian Hossa.

Slovenia’s next game is against the United States and it’s likely that this win will be the highlight of the tournament for Slovenia. Even still, if nothing else, Kopitar is hoping at least one thing comes from all of this.

“I hope now they’re not going to mix us up with Slovakia anymore,” he said.

Kings grab goalie insurance by signing Budaj

LOS ANGELES, CA - SEPTEMBER 22: Jhonas Enroth #1 and Peter Budaj #31 of the Los Angeles Kings stretch before a game against the Arizona Coyotes at STAPLES Center on September 22, 2015 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Andrew D. Bernstein/NHLI via Getty Images)
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In slightly less interesting Los Angeles Kings news than the latest in the Mike Richards fiasco, the team handed Peter Budaj a one-year, two-way deal on Friday.

The veteran goalie’s contract pays $575K on the NHL level and $100K in the AHL (though it’s $150K guaranteed), according to Hockey’s Cap.

At the moment, it sounds like Budaj will be third on the Kings’ goalie depth chart. That says as much about how things have been going lately for Los Angeles than Budaj’s work on a PTO.

As noted above, one of the more significant moves in Budaj’s favor came when the New York Islanders claimed Jean-Francois Berube off of waivers this week.

The Kings actually waived Budaj before signing him, so this has to be a relief to a goalie with a fairly robust resume as a backup.

All apologies to Budaj, but it’s probably true that the Kings would prefer not to see him at the NHL level very often in 2015-16.

Kings, NHLPA announce settlement in Richards grievance

Los Angeles Kings v New York Rangers

The Los Angeles Kings announced today that they have “reached an agreement with Mike Richards to resolve the grievance filed in relation to the termination of his NHL Standard Players Contract. The terms are agreeable to all parties.”

The club said that it will not be commenting further “on the terms” of the settlement.

The NHLPA released a similar statement.

It was reported earlier in the week that a settlement was close to being reached; however, it wasn’t clear what salary-cap penalties the Kings would incur.

We’re starting to find out some details now:

How the final numbers differ from what the Kings would have incurred if they’d bought Richards out will be interesting to see. And if there are differences, how will they be justified?

Stay tuned.