What’s going on with Pavelec and the Czech Olympic team?

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Something odd is happening between Winnipeg goalie Ondrej Pavelec and Czech head coach Alois Hadamczik.

On Wednesday, Pavelec was a healthy scratch for the Czechs’ tournament-opening loss to Sweden, despite the fact he’s the lone NHL netminder on the roster. The start was instead given to KHL netminder Jakub Kovar, which seemed to backfire — he was hooked after allowing three goals on 10 shots, admitting he should’ve stopped the second.

Another KHL goalie, Alexander Salak, played very well in relief by stopping 14 of 15 shots faced. Yet after the game, Hadamczik said Pavelec was the Czechs’ No. 1 goalie.

Insert confused face here.

“Because of the time zones [Sochi from North America], we decided to give Pavelec some time to rest,” was the exact explanation, per the Olympic News Service. Hadamczik added he was “confident that we lost not because of the goalkeeping,” and that the Czechs were in “pretty good shape right now and can even expect to enter the quarterfinals right now.”

So, back to Pavelec.

The Jets goalie learned of his fate on Tuesday, when Hadamczik explained he’d be held out of the Sweden game but would start against Latvia on Friday. Pavelec tried to take the decision in stride, according to the Winnipeg Free Press.

“It’s the Olympics. Everyone wants to play. That’s why we’re here,” he said. “I don’t know. I’ll work hard in practice. The coaches have their reasons. Hopefully this works for us and we win.”

It’s worth noting Pavelec prepped himself for potentially, um, unconventional coaching prior to Sochi:

As for trying to figure out exactly what’s going on, guesses are welcome.

The notion that Hadamczik “saved” Pavelec so he could adjust to the time zone is suspect, because many other Czech NHLers dealt with the adjustment and still managed to play against Sweden (including New Jersey’s Marek Zidlicky, who played nearly 27 minutes).

It’s possible the Czechs were trying to hide an injury of some sort. Kovar said after the game that “some of the players are a bit ill, maybe have a flu,” and defenseman Radko Gudas was scratched due to an illness. That said, Pavelec was shouldering a healthy workload in Winnipeg prior to the Olympics and is going to play Friday anyway.

There might be a political or disciplinary issue at hand, but no evidence to suggest it.

In the end, this could just be another in a long line of questionable decisions from the Czech brass, which began with the original Olympic roster announcement (defenseman Michal Barinka, selected over NHLers Roman Polak and Jan Hedja, is Hadamczik’s son-in-law) and has carried through to today.

Update: Here’s a good tidbit from CBC’s Elliotte Friedman

Hadamczik has some Mike Keenan in him when it comes to goalies. At the 2011 Worlds, where the Czechs won bronze, he rode Pavelec – who didn’t lose until the semifinals – all the way. At the 2006 Olympics, Dominik Hasek got hurt in the first game. Hadamczik moved to Tomas Vokoun, who was pulled against Canada. In came Milan Hnilicka, who beat Slovakia in quarters, but was clobbered by Sweden in the semis. Vokoun came back to win the bronze-medal game.

At the 2012 Worlds (another bronze), Hadamczik alternated Kovar and Jakub Stepanek in the round-robin. Kovar beat Sweden in the quarters, but was pulled in the semis. Stepanek won the bronze-medal game.

Lesson: be ready, Ondrej.

Related: PHT’s Pressing Olympic Questions: Will the Czechs regret their snubs?

Sheary’s agent — who’s also Dumoulin’s agent — hoping to avoid arbitration

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Conor Sheary‘s agent is hopeful that an arbitration hearing won’t be needed with the Pittsburgh Penguins.

And that same agent has reason to be optimistic, since he’s also the agent for Brian Dumoulin, who settled at the last minute today.

“Each (case) is so different,” Andrew Gross told the Post-Gazette this morning. “Ultimately, though, team and player would like to avoid going in that room. It’s not a pleasant experience.”

Sheary’s hearing isn’t scheduled until Aug. 4. The 25-year-old forward is coming off a 53-point regular season. In his young NHL career, he’s already won two Stanley Cups.

That said, the Penguins can’t afford to break the bank on an extension. After all, a big reason for their success has been having players like Sheary on affordable deals — a necessity with Sidney Crosby, Evgeni Malkin, Phil Kessel, and Kris Letang taking up so much cap space.

Sheary wasn’t all that productive in the 2017 playoffs either, scoring just two goals with five assists in 22 games, while finishing a team-worst minus-5 for the postseason.

“We’re prepared to go to arbitration,” Pens GM Jim Rutherford said last week.

Of course, Rutherford was also speaking about Dumoulin, and the two sides were able to reach an agreement on him.

You can probably expect a similar outcome with Sheary.

Just don’t bet the house on it.

Preds avoid arbitration with Austin Watson

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Another narrowly avoided arbitration to pass along.

The Nashville Predators have signed forward Austin Watson to a three-year, $3.3 million contract that will pay him $1 million next season, $1.1 million in 2018-19 and $1.2 million in 2019-20.

Watson’s hearing was scheduled for today.

From the press release:

Watson, 25 (1/13/92), set career highs in goals (5), assists (7), points (12), penalty minutes (99) and games played (77) during the 2016-17 season as he established himself as an integral member of the Nashville roster. The 6-foot-4, 204-pound winger then added four goals and nine points in 22 postseason contests as the Predators advanced to the 2017 Stanley Cup Final. Watson also appeared in 57 games for the Predators during the 2015-16 season, recording three goals and 10 points.

The Pittsburgh Penguins also avoided an arbitration hearing today by signing defenseman Brian Dumoulin to a six-year contract.

Spooner seeking $3.85 million in arbitration

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Ryan Spooner‘s arbitration hearing with the Boston Bruins is scheduled for Wednesday. And if it goes ahead, it could be a rather contentious one.

According to Sportsnet’s Elliotte Friedman, Spooner is seeking $3.85 million on a one-year deal, while the B’s are thinking almost half that at $2 million.

Spooner, a 25-year-old forward, will certainly be able to sell his offensive statistics. He had 49 points in 2015-16, then 39 points last season.

“Ryan’s a talented player,” said GM Don Sweeney, per CSNNE.com. “He’s had a lot of success. Our power play is better when he plays as well as he’s capable of playing, and he can really be a good complement to our group.”

But the knock on Spooner has always been his defensive play. The past two seasons, he’s a combined minus-17. Back in May, it was reported that the B’s were entertaining trade offers for him.

Spooner’s last contract paid him $1.9 million over two years.

Dumoulin agrees to six-year contract with Penguins

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Brian Dumoulin won’t need his arbitration hearing today.

The Pittsburgh Penguins announced this morning that the 25-year-old defenseman has agreed to terms on a six-year contract with a $4.1 million cap hit.

From the press release:

Dumoulin, 25, has been a key component to the Penguins’ back-to-back Stanley Cup championships, as he played in all 49 playoff games in that span, and recorded 14 points (3G-11A). In the 2017 playoffs, Dumoulin had an average ice time of 21:59 minutes, the most of any Penguins skater, and his plus-9 paced all team defenders. He assisted on Carl Hagelin‘s empty-net goal that sealed the 2-0 victory in the decisive Game 6 of the Cup Final against Nashville. 

Dumoulin is coming off of a contract that paid him just $800,000 in each of the past two seasons.

With Dumoulin signed, Pittsburgh now has five defenseman under contract for at least the next three seasons, the other four being Kris Letang, Justin Schultz, Olli Maatta, and Matt Hunwick.

The Pens still have one more arbitration case in forward Conor Sheary. His hearing is scheduled for Aug. 4.

Related: Without Letang, the ‘simple bunch’ gets it done for Penguins