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Blues’ trip to Yale to support Schwartz all ‘about family’

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NEW HAVEN, Conn. – In the dressing room of the Yale women’s hockey team, No. 17 still hangs in its proper stall. One day a year, the jersey is brought out rinkside and hung behind the home bench at Ingalls Rink, a reminder that Mandi Schwartz is always present at her team’s hockey games.

Friday night in New Haven, the Schwartz family presence was never greater. For the first time, Mandi’s brother Jaden was there in the rink his sister loved – and the kid brother brought a posse. Every one of Jaden’s St. Louis Blues teammates, along with coach Ken Hitchcock and GM Doug Armstrong, took a timeout from their four-game road trip to attend the “White Out for Mandi,” the annual Yale game that honors Jaden’s late sister, a Bulldog hockey player who died in 2011 following a 28-month fight with a rare form of leukemia.

Call it an unconventional way for St. Louis to celebrate an important bounceback win at Madison Square Garden on Thursday night, or to prepare for a road-trip finale at Nassau Coliseum on Saturday afternoon. All that seemed almost trivial to the Blues players who perched in a corner section of Ingalls, wearing their road white jerseys for the White Out and chatting up awestruck youth hockey players – many of whom had been at the rink for hours after watching the Blues practice there in the afternoon.

Whether those youth players or the Blues were more pleased to be there, it was sometimes hard to tell.

“It’s fun to have these little breaks in the season, break the routine a little bit,” said defenseman Kevin Shattenkirk, the New Rochelle, N.Y., native who scored the tiebreaking goal to beat the Rangers on Thursday, and who played youth hockey himself at Ingalls Rink. “But more than anything, to be here for [Jaden] and help him out and help his family out – really, we’re not doing much, we’re just trying to be a great supporting cast for Jaden.”

Jaden Schwartz was drafted by St. Louis in June 2010, some 10 months before his sister succumbed to acute myeloid leukemia, a cancer of the white blood cells for which Mandi needed, but never could find, a donor match for a bone marrow or stem cell transplant.

This season, Jaden, a 5-foot-10, 190-pound winger, has 16 goals and 35 points as a 21-year-old – Thursday’s was his 100th NHL game – for a Blues team that is by all indications a Stanley Cup contender. So when the NHL schedule came out last summer, his parents, Rick and Carol, set out to plan the fourth annual White Out – which raised funds for the Mandi Schwartz Foundation – around the Blues’ visit to the three New York-area teams. (New Haven is about 70 miles from New York City.)

“We expected maybe two or three buddies to come and join us for a game,” Rick Schwartz said. “But when Doug Armstrong said the whole team’s coming, and they’re going to be supporting Jaden … I see them here together, I’m glad they’re here by Jaden’s side today. This is a tough day for him.”

Jaden, meanwhile, was “shocked” by his teammates’ gesture. “I didn’t know what to expect,” he said. “I knew I was going to come, and maybe I’d bring some teammates, but it just kind of escalated, and one day, the whole team is coming. Yeah, shocked. And it means a lot.”

In between the Blues’ practice and the Yale game (a 2-2 tie with Brown), Jaden spent his first trip to Mandi’s campus on a Rick-and-Carol-guided tour of his sister’s dorm, and some of her classrooms. While the attention drawn to Mandi’s foundation, as well as the marrow donor drives she inspired, in conjunction with the “Be The Match” registry, is welcome, Jaden said he was looking forward to a bit of quiet reflection, to sit by Mandi’s locker that the team still keeps intact, “to get away and walk around.”

The Blues’ own getaway takes them to Long Island on Saturday, where a victory would give them a 3-1-0 road trip and help wash away the taste of Tuesday’s 7-1 thumping in New Jersey. Or maybe that sour taste is already gone.

“I think all of us, we get used to the [NHL] lifestyle, and at times you lose sight of other factors that are important in life,” Armstrong said while his Blues practiced before about 300 fans. “To get to come here, you realize what this is for, what this means.”

“You know, we first started looking at [Jaden] when he was 17 years old,” Hitchcock said. “We watched him play at Colorado College, we’ve watched him grow up in the organization. He’s a teammate, he’s a friend. This is about family.”

(Photo credit: Sam Rubin, Yale Sports Publicity)

Make that four straight wins for the Bruins

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Brent Burns turned in a dominating performance. But Brad Marchand had the last laugh.

Marchand scored his 25th goal of the season and, more importantly, the overtime winner for the Boston Bruins as they defeated the San Jose Sharks 2-1 on Sunday.

That’s Boston’s fourth consecutive win since the controversial coaching change — which took another twist earlier in the week when the rival Montreal Canadiens fired Michel Therrien and hired Claude Julien. Off a defensive zone faceoff, Marchand bolted up the ice for the breakaway pass, on what appeared to be a set play, beating Martin Jones through the legs.

The Bruins move back into third in the Atlantic Division, and are now only four points back of the faltering Habs for first.

Meanwhile, the Sharks were unable to fully capitalize on another freakish Brent Burns outing. He’s been dubbed ‘an unstoppable force’ in recent posts at PHT — a defenseman possessing great size at six-foot-five-inches tall and 230 pounds, but no shortage of mobility and offensive talent with 27 goals and 64 points in 60 games. Um, and did we mention he’s a defenseman. . . ?

Against the Bruins, he had 20 shot attempts — by far the most of any player in this game — in just over 26 minutes of ice time.

Given the final score, that probably doesn’t mean much to Brad Marchand.

Jacob Trouba will have a hearing for head shot on Mark Stone

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It appears Jacob Trouba will face supplemental discipline from the NHL.

The league’s Department of Player Safety has said in a Twitter statement that Trouba, the Winnipeg Jets defenseman, will have a hearing tomorrow for his head shot on Ottawa Senators forward Mark Stone during Sunday’s game.

Trouba was assessed only a minor penalty on the play. Stone, who dealt with a concussion prior to the beginning of the season, stayed down on the ice before he eventually made his way to the dressing room.

The incident occurred when Trouba stepped up to throw a hit on Stone, but instead caught him in the head as he followed through, sending Stone to the ice.

Stone was one of three Ottawa forwards to leave the game because of injuries, which are piling up for the Senators.

Video: Drouin ‘wasn’t going to be denied’ on thrilling OT winner

TAMPA, FL - APRIL 30:  Jonathan Drouin #27 of the Tampa Bay Lightning celebrates his goal against the New York Islanders  during the first period in Game Two of the Eastern Conference Second Round during the 2016 NHL Stanley Cup Playoffs at Amalie Arena on April 30, 2016 in Tampa, Florida. (Photo by Scott Iskowitz/Getty Images)
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The Tampa Bay Lightning needed overtime to defeat the Colorado Avalanche on Sunday, but it’s a critical win for the Bolts as they try to chase down a playoff spot.

The hero? Jonathan Drouin, and he did so with a thrilling individual effort — making moves, then losing the puck and then immediately getting it back before he finally scored on the backhander.

That’s his 17th goal of the season. Tampa Bay gets a 3-2 win, which keeps them five points back of Toronto for the final wild card spot in the East.

‘It looks like a disaster’ — Senators could be facing more injury problems

BOSTON, MA - MAY 27:  Head coach Guy Boucher of the Tampa Bay Lightning speaks to the media after their 0 to 1 loss to the Boston Bruins in Game Seven of the Eastern Conference Finals during the 2011 NHL Stanley Cup Playoffs at TD Garden on May 27, 2011 in Boston, Massachusetts.  (Photo by Elsa/Getty Images)
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Not only did the Ottawa Senators lose on Sunday, but three different forwards left the game because of injury.

And that was after they had already lost forward Bobby Ryan indefinitely because of a hand injury. In a 3-2 loss to the Winnipeg Jets, the Senators had Mike Hoffman, Mark Stone and Tommy Wingels leave with injuries.

Hoffman suffered a lower-body injury in the first period, while Stone was caught with a hit to the head from defenseman Jacob Trouba. That infraction might result in Trouba getting further supplementary discipline from the NHL.

“Tough day with the loss of Bobby and then we lost another bunch of guys. At some point I felt, there was nobody on the bench,” said Senators coach Guy Boucher, who appeared furious with the officials’ decision to give Trouba only a minor penalty for an illegal check to the head.

“I can give you an update – it doesn’t look good. We have to wait until tomorrow to be clear and precise about all these guys.

“Right now, we could be losing quite a few guys … It looks like a disaster. We’ll see tomorrow and maybe the disaster is not as bad as we think but you’ve got to be ready for anything.”

What especially hurts for the Senators is that Hoffman, Stone and Ryan are three very capable offensive players, and if all three are out long-term, that’s a good chunk of scoring suddenly gone from their lineup. Stone leads the team with 22 goals, while Hoffman is tied for second in that category with Kyle Turris at 19 goals.

The Senators had a chance to take over top spot in the Atlantic Division. With a win, Ottawa would’ve tied Montreal with 70 points, but taken first in the division because of fewer games played.