Streaks aplenty: Ducks win 10th in a row


Quite a few streaks – some great, some lousy – were on the line on Saturday, most notably the Anaheim Ducks’ impressive winning run. Let’s take a look at a few of the more interesting ones in a single, tidy post:

Anaheim 3, Phoenix 2 (OT)

The Ducks have now won 10 games in a row thanks to Saku Koivu, who scored two goals (including the game-winner). The Coyotes likely feel about the opposite of Anaheim right now; while the Ducks are on that historic run, Phoenix has lost three in a row and six of its last seven games. On the bright side, they’re collecting points; five consecutive contests have gone beyond regulation and they squeezed into OT by scoring two goals in about four minutes late in tonight’s contest. Still, they might regret this lull if they’re fighting for a playoff spot toward April.

(Anaheim, on the other hand, might just be jockeying for the best seed. The Ducks haven’t just won a lot, they’ve also braved a road-heavy schedule; they have eight more home than away games remaining, even after this win in Anaheim.)

Montreal 2, Tampa Bay 1 (SO)

The Canadiens ended the Lightning’s five-game winning streak on Saturday. With this win, Carey Price (18-11-2) isn’t that far behind Ben Bishop (20-5-3) in the wins department. Both are enjoying excellent seasons, which is why it probably shouldn’t be surprising that each goalie only allowed one goal before the shootout.

Nashville 3, Los Angeles 2

The streaky Predators came out on top in a game that featured a wild finish, ending their five-game losing streak in the process. Mike Fisher scored 16:42 into the third period, Jeff Carter tied things up 2-2 with 37 seconds left and then Fisher scored a goal that ended up being reviewed 10 seconds later to win the game.

Naturally, this was a Kings loss, so it was Ben Scrivens taking the defeat instead of Martin Jones.

Check out today’s other posts for more results, although you might want to check back on Sunday morning for bits about the New Jersey Devils’ 2-1 win against the New York Islanders …

PHT Morning Skate: 10 years of Ovechkin; 10,000 days with Lamoriello

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PHT’s Morning Skate takes a look around the world of hockey to see what’s happening and what we’ll be talking about around the NHL world and beyond.

Looking back at 10 years of Alex Ovechkin with the Washington Capitals, in case the above video made you want more. (CSN Mid-Atlantic)

David Conte spent 10,000 days with Lou Lamoriello and lived to tell about it. (TSN)

Want to spot some contract year guys? Here are 32 pending restricted free agents. (Sportsnet)

NHL GMs are starting to sniff around with the 2015-16 season about to kick off. (Ottawa Sun)

Some backstory on Zack Kassian that was passed around on Twitter last evening. (Canucks website)

Hey, you can’t say Raffi Torres hasn’t literally paid for his ways:

This is some quality chirping between Jaromir Jagr and Matthew Barnaby:

Cocaine in the NHL: A concern, but not a crisis?

Montreal Canadiens v Minnesota Wild

Does the NHL have a cocaine problem?

TSN caught up with deputy commissioner Bill Daly, who provided some fascinating insight:

“The number of [cocaine] positives are more than they were in previous years and they’re going up,” Daly said. “I wouldn’t say it’s a crisis in any sense. What I’d say is drugs like cocaine are cyclical and you’ve hit a cycle where it’s an ‘in’ drug again.”


Daly said that he’d be surprised  “if we’re talking more than 20 guys” and then touched on something that may be a problem: they don’t test it in a “comprehensive way.”

As Katie Strang’s essential ESPN article about the Los Angeles Kings’ tough season explored in June, there are some challenges for testing for a drug like cocaine. That said, there are also some limitations that may raise some eyebrows.

For one, it metabolizes quickly. Michael McCabe, a Philadelphia-based toxicology expert who works for Robson Forensic, told ESPN.com that, generally speaking, cocaine filters out of the system in two to four days, making it relatively easy to avoid a flag in standard urine tests.

The NHL-NHLPA’s joint drug-testing program is not specifically designed to target recreational drugs such as cocaine or marijuana. The Performance Enhancing Substances Program is put into place to do exactly that — screen for performance-enhancing drugs.

So, are “party drugs” like cocaine and molly an issue for the NHL?

At the moment, the answer almost seems to be: “the league hopes not.”

Daly goes into plenty of detail on the issue, so read the full TSN article for more.