Quenneville: Crawford ‘needs to be better’

21 Comments

Chicago Blackhawks head coach Joel Quenneville got right down to it on the topic of his goaltender Corey Crawford.

“He needs to be better,” said Quenneville, according to Tracey Myers of CSN Chicago.

The advice for Crawford came after the Blackhawks coughed up a 4-3 decision to the Minnesota Wild, a Central Division foe, on Thursday night. Chicago captured the lead early on in the third period, but quickly gave it up as the Wild scored twice in less than four minutes to snatch the victory back.

Marco Scandella’s first goal of the season turned out to be the winner. It came with 1:48 remaining in regulation time.

Crawford faced only 23 shots the entire night, making 19 saves.

The Blackhawks, still first in the Central Division by three points, have lost their last two games, which follow after a six-game winning streak to cap off their Circus Trip in impressive style.

“You look at the last couple games. There are mistakes we’ve made that we have to tend to, obviously,” said Blackhawks’ captain Jonathan Toews.

Updated Stanley Cup Final lineups: Carl Hagelin, Colin Wilson out in Game 1

Leave a comment

PHT provided early looks at what the Nashville Predators’ and Pittsburgh Penguins’ lineups might look like, and those viewpoints ended up being mostly correct.

That’s especially true when it comes to the Penguins. As expected, Carl Hagelin will not suit up for the Penguins in Game 1 of the Stanley Cup Final. Patric Hornqvist indeed returns while Jake Guentzel avoids a healthy scratch.

Here’s the lines that Pittsburgh listed on Twitter:

The Predators provide a surprise, however, as Colin Wilson is not in the mix. Instead, the Predators will have Craig Smith and Mike Fisher in the lineup.

Game 1 is just minutes from beginning. Check it out on NBC or stream it via the link below.

CLICK HERE TO WATCH LIVE

Daly addresses Voynov potentially returning to Kings

Getty
1 Comment

An interesting development on Monday, prior to Game 1 of the Stanley Cup Final — following Gary Bettman’s state of the league address, deputy commissioner Bill Daly was asked about the possibility of former Kings d-man Slava Voynov returning to the NHL.

Voynov hasn’t played in L.A. since the ’14-15 campaign, when he was suspended indefinitely while facing domestic violence charges.

“If that was ever something that was proposed, we’re on record as saying that would require a proceeding before the commissioner,” Daly said, when asked about Voynov’s possible return.

When asked if Voynov had “served his time,” Daly offered the following:

“Ultimately that’s not my decision, that’ll be Gary’s decision.

“I don’t want to speculate either on what that might be. I’ve hear from time to time that he might have an interest in coming back to the National Hockey League, but that hasn’t advanced in any material way to this point.

“So let’s wait and see if it happens.”

The Voynov topic arose when a reporter asked Daly about the league’s stance, on the understanding that “at one point, the Kings were considering trying to bring [Voynov] back.”

That came on the heels of a report from John Hoven of Mayor’s Manor, who said Kings management and scouts had seen Voynov play “multiple times” this season.

In July of 2015, Voynov pleaded no contest to a reduced misdemeanor charge and was sentenced to 90 days in jail. Months later, he returned to his native Russia and signed a three-year pact with SKA Saint Petersburg.

The move freed L.A. from Voynov’s $4.16 million average annual cap hit. Per The OC Register, Voynov’s decision to “self-depart” the U.S. may have kept the door open for a return to North America at some point in the future.

In October, Team Russia tried to include Voynov on its active roster for the World Cup of Hockey, claiming it was in negotiations with the league on the matter. The NHL eventually ruled him ineligible — “our position was the NHL suspension disqualified him,” Daly explained — and he was eventually replaced by Bolts blueliner Nikita Nesterov.

Bettman dismisses Penguins’ complaints about Crosby treatment

Getty
5 Comments

PITTSBURGH — Pittsburgh Penguins general manager Jim Rutherford is not happy with some of the treatment his captain and best player, Sidney Crosby, has been receiving this postseason.

The most notable example was probably the cross-check to the head he received from Washington Capitals defenseman Matt Niskanen in the second-round, forcing him to miss the remainder of that game as well as the next one. In Game 6 of the Eastern Conference Finals against the Ottawa Senators, he was on the receiving end of some extra curricular activity, including this water bottle squirt from Mike Hoffman during the game.

In speaking to Ken Campbell of the Hockey News on Sunday, Rutherford sounded off and said that if the league does not take steps to protect its stars the league is headed back to where it was in the 1970s.

From The Hockey News:

“I hear year after year how the league and everyone loves how the Penguins play,” said Penguins GM Jim Rutherford. “ ‘They play pure hockey and they skate.’ Well, now it’s going to have to change and I feel bad about it, but it’s the only way we can do it. We’re going to have to get one or two guys…and some of these games that should be just good hockey games will turn into a sh—show. We’ll go right back to where we were in the ’70s and it’s really a shame.”

And more…

“The league has got to fix it,” Rutherford said. “In other leagues, they protect star players. In basketball, they don’t let their top players get abused. And in our league, well the thing I keep hearing is, ‘That’s hockey. That’s hockey,’ No, it’s not.”

On Monday, during his annual state of the league address before Game 1 of the Stanley Cup Final, Bettman was asked about the treatment of Crosby as well as Rutherford’s comments.

Bettman said even though he has tremendous respect for Rutherford he found the timing of the comments to be “odd.”

“In the last few hours I saw Mr. Rutherford’s comments, and on a both a personal and professional level I think the world of Jim Rutherford,” said Bettman.

“He has done a great job here, as he did in Carolina. The timing of what he said seems a little odd. That is something you do in a GM’s meeting, not the night before or day of the Stanley Cup Final.”

Specifically, Bettman seemed to write it all off as gamesmanship leading into the Stanley Cup Final.

“Maybe he is trying to tweak the officials a little bit, but in the final analysis, we don’t want our players getting hurt. I think it is fair to say all of the teams that have been in the playoffs have been very physical. There are a couple of people have complained from other teams about some of the things Pittsburgh players have done. Some of that goes in the category of gamesmanship. Some of that goes to the fact we need to be vigilant as a league to make sure players are not unnecessarily and inappropriately hurt. As I said that is something we continue to monitor and will. Having said that I take all of the concerns from all of our players, all of our clubs and all of our owners very seriously on this issue.”

Along with the concussion that Crosby received as a result of the Niskanen hit, he also had another hard fall into the boards later in that series and was then on the receiving end of some extra curricular activity from the Ottawa Senators late in the Eastern Conference Final.

Niskanen was ejected for his cross-check, but did not receive any supplemental discipline from the league.

The truly eye-opening thing about Rutherford’s commentary was the part where he said they might need to get “one or two guys,” seemingly referring to a desire to bring in some added muscle. Along with that sort of thing not really working as a deterrent, that would also run counter to the way Rutherford has built this Penguins roster over the past two years where they have been more focussed on speed and skill than size and toughness. Given that they are back in the Stanley Cup Final for the second year in a row the approach seems to be working.

Tampa awarded the 2018 All-Star Game, further dampening Olympic hopes

Getty
Leave a comment

PITTSBURGH — The Tampa Bay Lightning will host the 2018 NHL All-Star Game.

The league made the announcement today before Game 1 of the Stanley Cup Final, confirming a report that came out a couple of weeks ago.

The announcement was noteworthy beyond the Bolts getting the event. It was also the latest nail in the 2018 Winter Olympics coffin, so far as NHL participation is concerned.

That’s because the last three Olympic years (2006, 2010, 2014), there has been no All-Star Game.

The 2018 Winter Olympics run Feb. 9-25 in South Korea, starting just two weeks after the 2018 ASG is now scheduled to be played (Jan. 28).

The final, final nail in the coffin could come next month when the NHL announces the 2017-18 schedule during the draft in Chicago (June 23-24).

The league announced in April its “intention” to finalize the 2017-18 schedule “without any break to accommodate the Olympic Winter Games.” However, some felt at the time that the league was bluffing.

NHL commissioner Gary Bettman said today that nothing had changed with regards to the April announcement.