Jeff Skinner

Three major signings could make or break Canes for years


The Carolina Hurricanes didn’t have the most eventful of summers, but that’s because they made their big moves ahead of time.

Forwards Jordan Staal, Alexander Semin, and Jeff Skinner are all entering the first season of their respective long-term deals and while they are all are great players, each of them come with a significant amount of risk too.

Among them, Staal’s 10-year, $60 million deal is in some ways the safest. Although it’s also the longest contract by far, Staal is only 24 years old. When Carolina originally acquired him, there was some speculation that he would end up playing primarily with his older brother, Eric, but instead Staal fell into the role of the team’s second-line center.

Staal scored 10 goals and 31 points in 48 games last season, although he also finished near the bottom of the league with a minus-18 rating. Still, it’s not hard to envision Staal being a good top-six forward for years to come provided he can stay healthy, which leads us to Skinner.

There’s no question that the 2010-11 Calder Trophy winner is talented, but he’s just 21 and has already dealt with concussions in back-to-back seasons. Skinner is also coming off of a disappointing campaign on the ice. He got off to a strong start, but fizzled with just five goals and nine points in his final 28 games. Skinner is about to begin a six-year, $34.35 million contract.

Both forwards have sizable cap hits, but they’re exceeded by Alexander Semin’s five-year, $35 million deal. Semin disappointed in 2011-12 and that combined with questions about his attitude led him to eventually settle for a one-year “prove it” contract with Carolina. He responded with 13 goals and 44 points in 44 games.

Still, Semin has now had four fantastic seasons and three that left something to be desired, not counting his 22-point rookie campaign. Even during his rougher seasons, Semin is at least serviceable, but Carolina is paying him far too much to be happy with a moderate level of production.

At the end of the day, all long-term contracts come with a certain degree of risk. Whether or not these pay off could dictate the Hurricanes’ fate for years to come.

Report: Torres won’t appeal 41-game suspension

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Sounds like Raffi Torres is accepting his punishment.

Per Sportsnet, Torres won’t appeal his 41-game suspension for an illegal hit to the head of Anaheim’s Jakob Silfverberg.

The report comes just days after the NHL’s Department of Player Safety levied one of the longest disciplinary rulings in league history, citing both the severity of the Silfverberg hit and Torres’ lengthy history of suspensions, fines and warnings.

There was some thought, however, that Torres would try to challenge the ruling.


He does have a history of success in that department. In 2012,Torres successfully appealed his suspension for a headshot on Chicago’s Marian Hossa, and had his punishment reduced from 25 games to 21.

Torres also isn’t considered a “repeat offender” under the current collective bargaining agreement, as his last suspension came in 2013.

Of course, part of that clean record is due to the fact he hasn’t played much. Torres has largely been sidelined by injury for the last two seasons, missing all of last year with knee problems.

Sportsnet’s Elliotte Friedman delved further into the repeat offender thing in his latest 30 Thoughts column:

If you read the relevant sections of the CBA, the league takes the position that the repeat offender status is only applicable to fines. Repeaters are fined on a per-game basis, non-repeaters on a per-day basis. (The former is more expensive, because there are fewer games than days in an NHL season.) However, if you go to Section 18.2, among the factors taken into account are, “the status of the offender and, specifically, whether the Player has a history of being subject to Supplementary Discipline for On-Ice Conduct.”

So, in the NHL’s view, a player’s history is relevant, even if longer than 18 months ago.

Should the report prove accurate and Torres doesn’t appeal, he will be eligible to return to action on Jan. 14, when the Sharks take on the Oilers.

Report: Kings, Richards nearing settlement

Mike Richards
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The Los Angeles Kings and Mike Richards may be nearing a settlement in their dispute over Richards’ terminated contract, TSN’s Bob McKenzie is reporting.

You can read the report for all the details, but we’re sure curious about this part:

If a settlement is reached, there’s no word yet on what salary cap penalties the Kings would still face. There’s bound to be something, but not likely as onerous as the full value of Richards’ contract, which carries with it a cap hit of $5.75 million. If there’s a settlement, Richards would undoubtedly become a free agent though there’s no telling at this point what monies he would be entitled to from the Kings in a settlement.

The issue here is precedent, and what this case could set. The NHL and NHLPA can’t allow teams to escape onerous contracts through a back door, and many are adamant that that’s what the Kings were attempting to do in Richards’ case.