Can Canes weather next season’s division change?


Life wasn’t always that easy for the Carolina Hurricanes in the relatively cushy (and defunct) Southeast Division, so what will happen now that they’re in what could be a blistering Metropolitan Division?

If you judge the situation based on the past alone, it doesn’t look great for Carolina.

That being said, one shouldn’t dismiss the Hurricanes’ talent. Plenty of teams would be glad to boast a core that includes Eric and Jordan Staal, Cam Ward, Alexander Semin, Jeff Skinner and so on. Much went wrong for Carolina last season, yet if a few things turn, the Canes could be a far more formidable team.

Still, the situation seems foreboding on paper. Consider their division mates:

Columbus – Maybe the most mysterious team in the division, if not the NHL. Still, it’s tough to deny the optimism surrounding a team that is adding star power and employs the reigning Vezina Trophy winner in Sergei Bobrovsky.

New Jersey – No doubt about it, losing Ilya Kovalchuk hurts. Still, this team quietly put up great puck possession numbers last season but had bad luck scoring goals and preventing them in 2013. The Devils could be dangerous if they can replace Kovalchuk by free agent committee and if more bounces go their way in 2013-14.

NY Islanders – Sure, they mainly stood in place this offseason, but the Isles seem like they’re on the upswing lately. GM Garth Snow has quietly developed into one of the league’s most underrated executives.

NY Rangers – There’s some turmoil (contract years, coaching changes) in the Big Apple, although that pressure could actually yield some fantastic results. At worst, they should be a playoff contender.

Philadelphia – There’s no denying the Flyers’ flaws, yet Philly could very well top Carolina in its strongest area (offensive creativity) while being comparable in their shared area of greatest weakness (playing defense).

Pittsburgh – It’s easy to lose sight of the Penguins’ regular season dominance amid fairly steady drama, but most will probably peg them as the favorites.

Washington – While Carolina couldn’t exploit the Southeast, the Caps must be a little forlorn to see it go. Washington seems primed to be in the mix, especially if Mikhail Grabovski is as much of a steal as “fancy stat” lovers believe.

Looking at Carolina’s neighbors, how many of those situations look worse than the Hurricanes’ predicament? Maybe one or two?

For the Hurricanes to return to playoff contention, they’ll need to prove they can stick with some tough competition. Of course, it wouldn’t hurt if a few of those teams fall on their faces, too …

More Hurricanes Day at PHT fun

Carolina leans on Cam Ward

Will the defense get better?

It could all come down to three signings

PHT Morning Skate: 10 years of Ovechkin; 10,000 days with Lamoriello

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PHT’s Morning Skate takes a look around the world of hockey to see what’s happening and what we’ll be talking about around the NHL world and beyond.

Looking back at 10 years of Alex Ovechkin with the Washington Capitals, in case the above video made you want more. (CSN Mid-Atlantic)

David Conte spent 10,000 days with Lou Lamoriello and lived to tell about it. (TSN)

Want to spot some contract year guys? Here are 32 pending restricted free agents. (Sportsnet)

NHL GMs are starting to sniff around with the 2015-16 season about to kick off. (Ottawa Sun)

Some backstory on Zack Kassian that was passed around on Twitter last evening. (Canucks website)

Hey, you can’t say Raffi Torres hasn’t literally paid for his ways:

This is some quality chirping between Jaromir Jagr and Matthew Barnaby:

Cocaine in the NHL: A concern, but not a crisis?

Montreal Canadiens v Minnesota Wild

Does the NHL have a cocaine problem?

TSN caught up with deputy commissioner Bill Daly, who provided some fascinating insight:

“The number of [cocaine] positives are more than they were in previous years and they’re going up,” Daly said. “I wouldn’t say it’s a crisis in any sense. What I’d say is drugs like cocaine are cyclical and you’ve hit a cycle where it’s an ‘in’ drug again.”


Daly said that he’d be surprised  “if we’re talking more than 20 guys” and then touched on something that may be a problem: they don’t test it in a “comprehensive way.”

As Katie Strang’s essential ESPN article about the Los Angeles Kings’ tough season explored in June, there are some challenges for testing for a drug like cocaine. That said, there are also some limitations that may raise some eyebrows.

For one, it metabolizes quickly. Michael McCabe, a Philadelphia-based toxicology expert who works for Robson Forensic, told that, generally speaking, cocaine filters out of the system in two to four days, making it relatively easy to avoid a flag in standard urine tests.

The NHL-NHLPA’s joint drug-testing program is not specifically designed to target recreational drugs such as cocaine or marijuana. The Performance Enhancing Substances Program is put into place to do exactly that — screen for performance-enhancing drugs.

So, are “party drugs” like cocaine and molly an issue for the NHL?

At the moment, the answer almost seems to be: “the league hopes not.”

Daly goes into plenty of detail on the issue, so read the full TSN article for more.