Can Chicago avoid a Stanley Cup hangover?


Most hockey fans remember it clearly: the 2010 Chicago Blackhawks rampaged to a Stanley Cup victory, yet a money crunch decimated their supporting cast. That next season saw the defending champions merely struggle to compete.

Naturally, then, the question is: will the same thing happen to 2013’s reigning title holders? Let’s look at some big reasons why and why not.

Avoiding huge losses

There’s no doubt that the 2013-14 Blackhawks will look a little different than last year’s model, but losing the likes of Michael Frolik, Dave Bolland and Viktor Stalberg pales in comparison to the losses the 2010-11 team coped with.

Whether it be by trade or free agency, Chicago lost the likes of Antti Niemi, Dustin Byfuglien, Andrew Ladd and Kris Versteeg that summer.


This time around, the ‘Hawks retained their Cup-winning goalie in Corey Crawford. (At least for next season.)

Ray Emery left of Philly in favor of ancient backup Nikolai Khabibulin, so that change plus tough-to-top numbers from 2013 means that the Blackhawks will probably deal with smaller margins of error.

Seriously, how can Crawford + Khabibulin equal the combined regular season and postseason that Crawford + Emery produced in 2013?

Crawford: 19-5-5, .926 save percentage in regular season, 16-7 with .932 in playoffs.
Emery: 17-1-0 with a .922 save percentage in regular season.

Injuries and bad luck

The Blackhawks rolled with some punches last year, but the wrong set of injuries could keep them from being near the dominant team that made history in 2013.

Sure, Jonathan Toews and Patrick Kane are still surprisingly young, yet that core put on a lot of mileage last season. (We’re looking at you, Marian Hossa.)

Easier division

On paper, at least, the new Central Division is far more manageable than the old one. The Detroit Red Wings and (possibly rising) Columbus Blue Jackets leave for three teams that failed to make the playoffs (Colorado, Dallas and Winnipeg) plus one that was easily dismissed in the first round by Chicago (Minnesota).

That alone seems like a nice trade for the Blackhawks, even if they’ll miss their rivalry with Detroit.


Even if everything goes right, Chicago might not top last season. Still, the Blackhawks are much better suited to defend their title this time around.

More Blackhawks day on PHT:

Pirri leads list of ‘Hawks prospects to watch

Second-line center spot up for grabs in Chicago

Crawford’s cloudy future

Diaz could leave Rangers for Europe

Raphael Diaz, Mike Sislo
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Could Raphael Diaz be on his way back to Switzerland?

We’ll know in a month.

Diaz, who lost out on the Rangers’ final blueline spot in training camp, has reported to the club’s AHL affiliate in Hartford but doesn’t seem pleased with his current situation, per the Post:

The 29-year-old Diaz, who cleared waivers last Saturday after the Blueshirts opted to keep rookie Dylan McIlrath as the club’s seventh on the blue line, is interested in the European option if he is not in the NHL.

The Blueshirts have told Diaz they will revisit the situation at the end of October, but have not promised to release him or assign him to a European team at that point.

If Diaz, a Swiss native who represented Switzerland in the 2014 Olympics, does play in Europe during the season, he would have to go through waivers in order to return to the NHL.

Diaz’s agent, Ritch Winter, told the Post that Diaz signed a one-year, $700,000 deal with the Rangers “to play with the Rangers.”

And it’s understandable if Diaz — a journeyman offensive defenseman — isn’t happy with this situation.

While some believe McIlrath earned his roster spot on merit, some think it’s because of his contract status. McIlrath, who’s only 23 and a former first-round pick, would’ve needed to clear waivers to go back to Hartford, and it’s believed he would’ve been claimed by another club.

Canucks say Markstrom (hamstring) out another week — could it be longer?

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Bit of uncertainty out of Vancouver regarding the health of backup goalie Jacob Markstrom.

Markstrom, a late drop from the Canucks’ 5-1 opening-night win over Calgary, has suffered a hamstring injury that will keep him sidelined for another week, the club announced on Thursday.

With Markstrom out, backup duties will stay with AHL call-up Richard Bachman, who served as Ryan Miller‘s No. 2 on Wednesday.

Now, the focus turns to how long Bachman keeps those duties.

Per a Sportsnet report, Markstrom could miss up to three weeks of action with his injury. If that’s the case, Bachman will almost certainly be called into action; the Canucks will play eight games in 17 nights starting with Saturday’s home-opener against the Flames, which includes back-to-backs in Los Angeles and Anaheim on Oct. 12 and 13.

It would be asking a lot of the No. 1, 35-year-old Ryan Miller, to shoulder that entire load.

Bachman does have some NHL experience, with nearly 50 games to his credit. That includes a 3-2-0 record with the Oilers last year, in which he posted a 2.84 GAA and .911 save percentage.