Steve Ludzik

Ludzik believes hockey career led to Parkinson’s

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Former NHL player Steve Ludzik remains convinced that he developed Parkinson’s disease as a result of his hockey career.

On Tuesday, the 52-year-old reiterated his claim to the National Post, and said his doctors generally agree with his conclusion.

“They say they can’t prove it, and they can’t not prove it,” Ludzik said. “But it’s likely this is from damage to the head.”

Ludzik played 424 games in the NHL, most of them for the Chicago Blackhawks. During his playing career, he took countless hits.

“I remember going to the bench and I couldn’t remember which town I was in,” Ludzik told QMI Agency last year. “You never said anything (about concussions) because you wanted to keep your job.”

He added: “I know in my heart of hearts (the disease) was caused by taking shots to the head.

“It’s not the fights. It’s the constant pounding.”

According to the Parkinson’s Disease Foundation, the causes of the disease remain unknown. However, according to Caroline M. Tanner (M.D., Ph.D.), “Traumatic brain injury — injury that results in amnesia or loss of consciousness — has been associated with an increased risk of developing Parkinson’s years after the injury.”

Here’s what TCF Bank Stadium will look like for Minnesota’s outdoor game

TCF Bank Stadium
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What you’re looking at is an architectural rendering of TCF Bank Stadium for the upcoming outdoor game between the Minnesota Wild and Chicago Blackhawks on Sunday, Feb. 21.

The current forecast for that day in Minneapolis is a high of 27° F and a low of 19° F, with only a 20 percent possibility of precipitation, i.e. snow.

Which is to say, that guy in the Toews jersey is gonna be cold. At least roll up your sleeves, man. Don’t be a hero. 

The game, scheduled for 3:30 p.m. ET, will be broadcast live on NBC as part of Hockey Day in America, while Hockey Night In Canada and TVA Sports will have the action for the folks up north.

50 years ago today, the NHL’s ‘great expansion’ begins

PHILADELPHIA, PA - APRIL 15: The Pittsburgh Penguins and the Philadelphia Flyers fight during the first period in Game Three of the Eastern Conference Quarterfinals during the 2012 NHL Stanley Cup Playoffs at Wells Fargo Center on April 15, 2012 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. The Flyers defeated the Penguins 8-4. (Photo by Bruce Bennett/Getty Images)
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“This is the year of the great expansion. For the first time, the league will be composed of twelve teams.”

Those were the words of former NHL president Clarence Campbell as he ushered in six new franchises to join the Original Six for the 1967-68 season.

We only mention this because it was 50 years ago today, in 1966, that the league awarded conditional teams to Philadelphia, Los Angeles, Pittsburgh, San Francisco, Minneapolis-St. Paul and St. Louis.

(To read more, click NHL.com’s anniversary piece. The Los Angeles Times also has a story on the birth of the Kings, while CSN Philly remembers the Flyers’ beginnings.)

For all you youngsters out there, San Francisco’s team, originally named the California Seals, ended up playing in Oakland, but not for long due to attendance issues. The franchise would move to Cleveland in 1976, where in 1978 it ceased operations and merged with the North Stars.

The North Stars also eventually relocated, though that didn’t happen until 1993 when they moved to Dallas. The expansion Wild were born a few years later.

Of the five surviving franchises of the “great expansion,” only the Blues have never won the Stanley Cup.

The Flyers were the first expansion team to hoist the Cup. They did it in 1974.

Related: Foley is ‘9.5’ out of 10 confident that NHL will expand to Vegas

Malkin (lower body) to miss rest of week

Evgeni Malkin
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Evgeni Malkin has missed Pittsburgh’s last three games, and now he’ll also miss at least the next two.

On Tuesday, head coach Mike Sullivan announced that Malkin will be held out for the remainder of this week to deal with his lower-body injury.

Malkin hasn’t played since registering two assists in a 6-5 win over Ottawa on Feb. 2, missing Friday’s 6-3 loss to the Bolts, Saturday’s 3-2 win over the Panthers and Monday’s big 6-2 whipping of Anaheim.

The Penguins next play on Wednesday (8 p.m. ET, NBCSN), then again on Friday versus the ‘Canes. It stands to reason Malkin could very well miss the Monday, Feb. 15 game against the Panthers as well, as the Pens would be on a mini two-game road swing through Carolina and Florida, returning back to Pittsburgh for a Feb. 18 home date against Detroit.

On the year, Malkin has 49 points in 49 games and had been producing exceptionally well prior to getting hurt, with 15 points in his last 13 games.

Maybe the Leafs didn’t want to trade Phaneuf, but they couldn’t afford to keep him

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The conference call was supposed to outline the reasons why Toronto traded its captain, Dion Phaneuf.

But instead, the man that orchestrated the deal — GM Lou Lamoriello — opened with all the reasons why the Leafs would miss him.

“I’ve been extremely impressed with Dion from day one,” Lamoriello explained on Tuesday, shortly after flipping Phaneuf to Ottawa in a blockbuster nine-player deal. “I came in with no preconceived notions, I really didn’t know what to expect other than what was hearsay at different times.

“He’s been impressive in every way whatsoever. And in the phone call I had with him, I expressed that and I meant it sincerely. He’s been a great leader, he’s handled every situation that’s been asked of him, and he’s going to be missed.”

But then, Lamoriello turned to the hard truth.

For as much as the Leafs liked Phaneuf and respected what he’d done in his six-plus seasons with the organization, he just didn’t fit anymore.

Phaneuf, who turns 31 in April, didn’t fit with the rebuild. Assuming the Leafs are two to three years away from being competitive, it’s hard to envision a (successful) blueprint in which a veteran defenseman — one that’s essentially been miscast as a No. 1 since arriving in Toronto — is pushing 35 while the team is on an upswing… while pulling in $7 million annually.

Which brings us to the next thing that didn’t fit in Toronto:

Phaneuf’s contract.

In the second of a seven-year, $49 million deal, Phaneuf would’ve been on Toronto’s books through 2021. That kind of term is an albatross, especially when the likes of Morgan Rielly and Nazem Kadri need new deals by next July, and prized prospects Mitch Marner, William Nylander and Kasperi Kapanen are all due to hit restricted free agency around the same time.

Sens GM Bryan Murray acknowledged as much in his conference call, saying the Phaneuf trade “gives [the Leafs] relief in the latter part of the contract.”

Lamoriello also made mention of that fact, pointing out that a key to the deal was not retaining any of Phaneuf’s salary.

“The length of Dion’s contract and the amount of cap space that is there — where that would put us at a given time, certainly not knowing where the cap will go, this gives us the opportunity to do things,” he said. “It also gives us the opportunity when some of our younger players are coming to the end of their entry-level contracts — who we have high expectations for — to sign them.”

In the end, the deck was just too stacked against Phaneuf.

The GM that acquired him (Brian Burke) and the one that extended him (Dave Nonis) are long gone, and the new regime made no bones about the fact that, for as much as they liked Phaneuf, they didn’t like his contract.

So, off to Ottawa he goes.

“This is a transaction, “Lamoriello said, “that we had no choice with.”

Related: For Sens, Phaneuf brings experience and ‘security on the back end’