Sens’ Turris on Alfredsson: ‘Don’t judge him for this one decision’


Kyle Turris has nothing but respect for ex-Ottawa captain Daniel Alfredsson — something he says won’t change now that Alfie’s in Detroit.

“I think he should be extremely respected coming back (to Ottawa), and hopefully the fans appreciate everything he’s done and don’t judge him for this one decision,” Turris told the Ottawa Citizen on Thursday. “I think when it’s all said and done, he’s at a point where he’s kind of earned the right to do what he wants.”

Alfredsson and the Red Wings visit Ottawa for the first time next season on Dec. 1, and nobody’s quite sure what the reaction will be.

The immediate aftermath of Alfredsson’s departure was anger and vitriol from Sens fans, as per CBC:

On local sports radio reaction was mixed from sadness to anger with some fans going so far as to call Alfredsson a traitor while others blamed the organization for allowing the captain to leave.

Various fans threatened to cancel season tickets; others called for Murray’s resignation while others felt Alfredsson was allowing greed to dictate his future.

The general consensus seemed to be that this would likely tarnish Alfredsson’s legacy with the Senators.

That was followed by Alfredsson saying he expects “resentment and anger from fans — and there should be.”

But as days passed, bad feelings seemed to diminish as more and more people from the Ottawa organization spoke.

“You have to respect [Alfredsson’s] decision,” said Sens defenseman Marc Methot. “He’s done so much for this city. It’s kind of hard to hold a grudge against him. I wish him all the best.”

Owner Eugene Melnyk, who was front and center during the Alfredsson departure, admitted that “at the end of the day, we’ll never forget Alfie for what he’s done for us.”

Now, Turris is standing up for his former teammate as well.

“I’m not going to lie, it was a complete privilege and honor to play with him for two years,” said Turris.

“I’ll think back to it for the rest of my life, what he taught me and how much fun it was playing with him, and I want to wish him the best of luck in Detroit.”

Bruins list Chara on IR, for now

Zdeno Chara
Leave a comment

Those who feel as though the Boston Bruins may rebound – John Tortorella, maybe? – likely rest some of their optimism on the back of a healthy Zdeno Chara.

It’s possible that he’s merely limping into what may otherwise be a healthy 2015-16 season, but it’s definitely looking like a slow start thanks to a lower-body injury.

The latest sign of a bumpy beginning came on Monday, as several onlookers (including CSNNE.com’s Joe Haggerty) pointed out that Chara was listed on injured reserve.

As Haggerty notes, that move is retroactive to Sept. 24, so his status really just opens up options for the Bruins.

Still … it’s a little unsettling, isn’t it?

The Bruins likely realize that they need to transition away from their generational behemoth, but last season provided a stark suggestion that may not be ready yet. Trading Dougie Hamilton and losing Dennis Seidenberg to injury only make them more dependent on the towering 38-year-old.

This isn’t really something to panic about, yet it might leave a few extra seats open on the Bruins’ bandwagon.

Kassian suspended without pay, placed in Stage 2 of Substance Abuse Program

Anaheim Ducks v Vancouver Canucks
1 Comment

Zack Kassian may have avoided major injuries stemming from his Sunday car accident, but it likely sent the signal that he may need help.

The response: he was placed in Stage Two of the Substance Abuse and Behavioral Health Program (SABH) of the NHL and NHLPA on Monday.

According to the league’s release, Kassian “will be suspended without pay until cleared for on-ice competition by the program administrators.”

Speaking of being suspended without pay, here’s a key detail:

The 24-year-old ended up with a broken nose and broken foot from that accident. The 2015-16 season was set to be his first campaign in the Montreal Canadiens organization after a tumultuous time with the Vancouver Canucks.

Kassian spoke of becoming more mature heading to Montreal, but the Canadiens were critical of his actions, wondering how many wake-up calls someone can get.

In case you’re wondering about the difference between stage one and two: