Blues re-sign Bouwmeester: five years, $27 million


The St. Louis Blues made a big move on Thursday, signing defenseman Jay Bouwmeester to a five-year, $27 million contract extension — ensuring he won’t go to free agency when his current deal expires at the end of 2013-14.

The extension is interesting on a number of fronts.

One is the timing perspective — St. Louis completed it prior to (or, made it a higher priority than) re-upping with prized RFA defenseman Alex Pietrangelo, who has been without a contract since July.

According to Jeremy Rutherford of the St. Louis Post-Dispatch, the Bouwmeester deal apparently won’t affect any future contract for Pietrangelo.

Also intriguing is the amount of money St. Louis has locked into its defense.

The Blues are carrying Bouwmeester’s extension, Kevin Shattenkirk’s four-year, $17 million deal, Roman Polak’s five-year, $13.75 million deal, Barret Jackman’s three-year, $9.5 million deal and Jordan Leopold’s two-year, $4.5 million deal.

Add it all up, and the Blues are now spending $3.3 million per defenseman, according to CapGeek — the fourth-highest total in the NHL.

And that’s without Pietrangelo.

Another interesting wrinkle? Bouwmeester is taking a pay cut to stay with the Blues.

His current deal carries a $6.68 million cap hit (a five-year, $33.4 million contract originally signed with Calgary in 2009) whereas his new one comes in at $5.4 million annually.

With the extension, St. Louis has the 29-year-old rearguard under contract until 2018-19.

Bouwmeester was acquired by the Blues prior to last season’s trade deadline and appeared in 14 games for the club, scoring seven points.

He also made his playoff debut in St. Louis’ opening-round series loss to the Kings, averaging 25:08 TOI per game — second only to Pietrangelo.

This is the second five-plus-year deal Bouwmeester has signed over the course of his career. Combined with his first contracts in Florida, he projects to make $72.9 million in lifetime NHL earnings, also according to CapGeek.

It looks like Havlat won’t make Panthers

Martin Havlat
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As PHT’s mentioned before, the Florida Panthers stand as a fascinating contrast between youth and experience.

Let’s not kid ourselves, though; fresh faces usually beat out gray beards, at least when it comes to teams that are still trying to build toward contender status.

While it’s by no means official, two Panthers beat writers – the Miami Herald’s George Richards and the Florida Sun-Sentinel’s Harvey Fialkov – report that the Panthers are likely to pass on Martin Havlat.

It wasn’t just about the likes of Jonathan Huberdeau and Nick Bjugstad leading the charge. Other young Panthers (maybe most notably Quinton Howden and Connor Brickley) made the team, thus making Havlat less necessary.

One would assume that it might be tough for the 34-year-old to find work, at least if he insists upon only an NHL deal.

Health issues continue to dog him, but he’s no longer one of those guys who tantalizes with talent when he is healthy enough to play.

Havlat also doesn’t really bring much to the table defensively. While other veterans can kill penalties and show a little more verstaility, Havlat’s greatest selling point is scoring.

Could this be it for a solid career that may nonetheless end with a “What if?” or two?

Silfverberg is set to practice again after Torres hit

Jakob Silfverberg
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Considering all of the controversy surrounding the 41-game suspension for Raffi Torres, some might have lost track of the guy who received that hit: Jakob Silfverberg.

The good news is that, at the moment, it seems like he’s OK.

The Anaheim Ducks announced that he skated on his own and will be involved in the team’s next practice:

That falls in line with some of the fall-out from the hit, as head coach Bruce Boudreau let out a relieved “thank goodness” at the young forward seemingly dodging a bullet.

Here’s video of the hit and the suspension decision:

Silfverberg, 24, enjoyed a nice breakout in 2014-15, especially during the playoffs.

Keep in mind that injuries can sometimes crop up later than expected, especially potential head injuries/concussions. Still, it seems like the initial reaction is that the damage was minimal.