Jaromir Jagr

Here are five unrestricted free agents that still haven’t signed


NHL news has come to a bit of a crawl after a crazy Friday and a somewhat busy weekend of free-agent signings.

As longtime agent JP Barry put it, “There is always a frenzy of moves, then a pause to reassess, and then a second wave.”

So…who could be part of that second wave?

Jaromir Jagr: At last glance, the 41-year-old reportedly had three teams interested in his services, including possibly Montreal. Jagr had a frustrating playoffs offensively, with no goals in 22 games for the Bruins. But some of that was bad luck, and he did have 10 assists. One big question general managers need to ask is, how will Jagr hold up to a regular 82-game schedule as opposed to one that’s cut almost in half by a lockout? He’ll be 42 by next year’s playoffs.

Mikhail Grabovski: Was bought out of his contract in Toronto, where he didn’t seem to enjoy Randy Carlyle’s coaching style anyway. But before Carlyle, when Grabovski was used in a more offensive role, he scored 29 goals and 23 goals in 2010-11 and 2011-12, respectively. We already mentioned the 29-year-old center as a potential match with the Washington Capitals.

Mason Raymond: The Calgary Flames were apparently kicking the tires on the speedy winger, but it’s not clear if there’s still interest. Raymond fell out of favor in Vancouver after scoring a career-high 25 goals in 2009-10. At 27 years old, he’s still young. In the right system and with the right linemates, he could score 20 again. But with his slight build, he’s never going to dominate the tough parts of the ice.

Damien Brunner: After scoring 12 times in 44 games during the regular season, then adding a team-high five goals in the playoffs, Brunner’s contract demands (reportedly $3 -3.5 million per season for 2-3 years) were seemingly too much for the Red Wings, who, of course, added Daniel Alfredsson and Stephen Weiss in free agency. Like Raymond, Brunner is only 27. But also like Raymond, he’s not the most physically-imposing forward in the league.

Ron Hainsey: Of all the remaining UFAs, nobody averaged more time on the ice than Hainsey did last year. The 32-year-old defenseman logged 22:52 per game for the Jets. And while he didn’t score a goal, he did have 13 assists. There was reportedly plenty of interest in Hainsey during last week’s interview period, so we can assume he’ll get signed at some point this summer. (Even though he may have rubbed some owners the wrong way during the lockout.)

Jason Demers tweets #FreeTorres, gets mocked

Los Angeles Kings v San Jose Sharks - Game One

Following his stunning 41-game suspension, it looks like Raffi Torres has at least one former teammate in his corner.

We haven’t yet seen how the San Jose Sharks or the NHLPA are reacting to the league’s hammer-dropping decision to punish Torres for his Torres-like hit on Jakob Silfverberg, but Jason Demers decided to put in a good word for Torres tonight.

It was a simple message: “#FreeTorres.”

Demers, now of the Dallas Stars, was once with Torres and the Sharks. (In case this post’s main image didn’t make that clear enough already.)

Perhaps this will become “a thing” at some point.

So far, it seems like it’s instead “a thing (that people are making fun of).”

… You get the idea.

The bottom line is that there are some who either a) blindly support Torres because they’re Sharks fans or b) simply think that the punishment was excessive.

The most important statement came from the Department of Player Safety, though.

Bruins list Chara on IR, for now

Zdeno Chara

Those who feel as though the Boston Bruins may rebound – John Tortorella, maybe? – likely rest some of their optimism on the back of a healthy Zdeno Chara.

It’s possible that he’s merely limping into what may otherwise be a healthy 2015-16 season, but it’s definitely looking like a slow start thanks to a lower-body injury.

The latest sign of a bumpy beginning came on Monday, as several onlookers (including CSNNE.com’s Joe Haggerty) pointed out that Chara was listed on injured reserve.

As Haggerty notes, that move is retroactive to Sept. 24, so his status really just opens up options for the Bruins.

Still … it’s a little unsettling, isn’t it?

The Bruins likely realize that they need to transition away from their generational behemoth, but last season provided a stark suggestion that may not be ready yet. Trading Dougie Hamilton and losing Dennis Seidenberg to injury only make them more dependent on the towering 38-year-old.

This isn’t really something to panic about, yet it might leave a few extra seats open on the Bruins’ bandwagon.