DeBoer didn’t know Devs were trading for Schneider


The Cory Schneider-to-New Jersey trade caught a lot of people off guard.

Including some within the Devils organization.

Like head coach Peter DeBoer, for example. On Monday, DeBoer said he had no idea his team was going to acquire the Vancouver netminder — even though he was at the draft.

“No I didn’t know. It was a surprise to me until Lou [Lamoriello, Devils GM] came down to our end of the table and told me,” DeBoer told the New Jersey Star-Ledger. “It was a real pleasant surprise, obviously. I don’t think it’s any secret that everybody has been wondering what is going to happen next at such a key position.”

While an amusing anecdote, it’s not too surprising.

Lamoriello is notoriously secretive and, at times, basically non-communicative when it comes to discussing player transactions, negotiations and contracts.

On that note, neither of the Devils’ goalies at the time — Martin Brodeur and Johan Hedberg — knew the Schneider deal was going down; Brodeur said he was “shocked” by the trade while Hedberg said he was caught off guard.

There’s also the not-so-small issue of New Jersey hosting the draft.

Had word leaked of the trade prior to Sunday’s selection, there’s a decent chance Devils fans — who were lined up to watch the club select ninth overall — would’ve stayed away.

Why show up if there’s no drama?

Finally, there’s the notion that while this deal was hatched prior to the draft, pulling the trigger happened quickly.

It could’ve been contingent on Bo Horvat being available at No. 9 for Vancouver to select; it could’ve also been one of those deals with a small window of opportunity.

The latter is the way DeBoer saw it, and he praised his boss for pouncing on the chance.

“When you look around the league starting goaltenders in their prime are few and far between. And they usually don’t get moved,” he explained.

“I think it was a unique opportunity and Lou jumped on it.”

Lucic: If I wanted to hurt Couture, ‘I would have hurt him’


Last night in Los Angeles, Kings forward Milan Lucic received a match penalty after skating the entire width of the ice to give San Jose’s Logan Couture a two-hand shove to the face.

Lucic didn’t hurt Couture, who had caught Lucic with an open-ice hit that Lucic didn’t like. Couture’s smiling, mocking face was good evidence that the Sharks’ forward was going to be OK.

This morning, Lucic was still in disbelief that he was penalized so harshly.

“I didn’t cross any line,” Lucic said, per Rich Hammond of the O.C. Register. “Believe me, if my intentions were to hurt him, I would have hurt him.”

While Lucic knew he deserved a penalty, he said after the game that he didn’t “know why it was called a match penalty.” His coach, Darryl Sutter, agreed, calling it “a borderline even roughing penalty.”

And though former NHL referee Kerry Fraser believes a match penalty was indeed warranted, Lucic said this morning that he hasn’t heard from the NHL about any possible supplemental discipline.

Nor for that matter has Dustin Brown, after his high hit on Couture in the first period.

In conclusion, it’s good to have hockey back.

Related: Sutter says Kings weren’t ‘interested’ in checking the Sharks

Torres apologizes to Silfverberg and Sharks


A statement from Raffi Torres:

“I accept the 41-game suspension handed down to me by the NHL’s Department of Player Safety. I worked extremely hard over the last two years following reconstructive knee surgery to resume my NHL career, and this is the last thing I wanted to happen. I am disappointed I have put myself in a position to be suspended again. I sincerely apologize to Jakob for the hit that led to this suspension, and I’m extremely thankful that he wasn’t seriously injured as a result of the play. I also want to apologize to my Sharks teammates and the organization.”

A statement from San Jose GM Doug Wilson:

“The Sharks organization fully supports the NHL’s supplementary discipline decision regarding Raffi. While we do not believe there was any malicious intent, this type of hit is unacceptable and has no place in our game. There is a difference between playing hard and crossing the line and there is no doubt, in this instance, Raffi crossed that line. We’re very thankful that Jakob was not seriously injured as a result of this play.”

Silfverberg says he expects to play Saturday when the Ducks open their regular season Saturday in San Jose.