Daniel Alfredsson

Alfredsson’s decision to leave Sens didn’t shock Chiarelli


When forward Daniel Alfredsson decided to put off retirement for at least another season, the assumption was that re-signing the long-time Senators captain would be a mere formality for Ottawa.

Even when reports started to surface that Alfredsson was talking to other teams, it seemed unlikely that the 40-year-old would actually leave the only NHL team that he’s ever played for.

As recently as Thursday, Senators GM Bryan Murray seemed almost dismissive about the threat of their captain actually leaving.

“I guess it’s the big issue in town. I didn’t realize it was that big an issue because we’re going to get it done, I assume,” Murray said.

But of course he signed elsewhere and one person that wasn’t surprised was one of the people courting him, Bruins GM Peter Chiarelli.

“After my discussions with him, no, I wasn’t surprised,” Chiarelli told NHL.com. “There’s a lot of similarities here, too, with Jarome [Iginla]. These guys are elite players in the league for a long time and they want to win. They have a thirst and a hunger, both, to win.”

The situations aren’t identical. Iginla was traded by the Calgary Flames to jump start their rebuilding efforts, while the Ottawa Senators are a young, but competitive team. Still, they’re both veterans that left cities that they had strong connections to, so Iginla can speak from experience when talking about Alfredsson’s decision.

“I don’t think he took it lightly at all,” Iginla said. “By going through it, I know it’s not an easy thing as far as leaving a team you’ve been with for a long time and made a lot of friends and life-long friends. …

“He wants to win. We want to win. As players you want to win and I don’t know which team he thinks is better or anything like that, that’s not for me to say. But obviously he still loves playing and has that fire. I guess he probably feels that’s his best shot.”

Ultimately, Alfredsson picked the Detroit Red Wings over Boston and regardless of his reasons, Chiarelli isn’t taking it personally.

“I don’t know what (Alfredsson’s) assessment was as to why he thought that was the better fit,” Chiarelli said, “but I respect it, the same way that I respect Jarome coming back to us and wanting an opportunity.”

Plus if the Boston Bruins beat the Detroit Red Wings in the playoffs, then they’ll get Alfredsson in 2014-15.


Sens GM Murray: Alfredsson conversation ‘devastating, disappointing’

Alfredsson expects anger from Sens fans, ‘as there definitely should be’

Alfredsson, Detroit make it official: one year, $5.5 million

Report: Kings, Richards nearing settlement

Mike Richards
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The Los Angeles Kings and Mike Richards may be nearing a settlement in their dispute over Richards’ terminated contract, TSN’s Bob McKenzie is reporting.

You can read the report for all the details, but we’re sure curious about this part:

If a settlement is reached, there’s no word yet on what salary cap penalties the Kings would still face. There’s bound to be something, but not likely as onerous as the full value of Richards’ contract, which carries with it a cap hit of $5.75 million. If there’s a settlement, Richards would undoubtedly become a free agent though there’s no telling at this point what monies he would be entitled to from the Kings in a settlement.

The issue here is precedent, and what this case could set. The NHL and NHLPA can’t allow teams to escape onerous contracts through a back door, and many are adamant that that’s what the Kings were attempting to do in Richards’ case.

Bettman to players: Don’t screw up ‘once-in-a-lifetime opportunity’ with drugs

Gary Bettman
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The NHL wants to take an educational approach — not a punitive one — to deter its players from using illicit drugs like cocaine.

“My interest is not to go around punishing people,” Bettman told Sportsnet today.

“My interest is getting players to understand the consequences of doing something that could jeopardize this great, once-in-a-lifetime opportunity that they’ve been given, to play in the NHL.”

While some players have expressed surprise at hearing that cocaine use is growing, the anecdotal evidence of substance abuse has been very much in the news, from Jarret Stoll‘s arrest to Mike Richards’ arrest to, more recently, Zack Kassian‘s placement in the NHL/NHLPA’s treatment program.

“We don’t have the unilateral right to do things here. We need the consent of the Players’ Association,” Bettman said. “It’s not about punishment. It’s about making sure we get it to stop.”

Related: Cocaine in the NHL: A concern, but not a crisis?